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  1. #1
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    Default More on Spring tools

    Seeing SB34's nice find I kept thinking I had seen this in a early book........ so I looked for it and found shortly.... This is from "The Modern Practice of American Machinists and Engineers" by Egbert P. Watson, 1867



    On the next page it mentions you can put a small wedge in it making it a solid tool....

    And here is a cute little one I found ages ago.... it has a 5/16" x 7/16" shank...... the part I like is the little wrench that stores in the back..... also notice on the bottom it has a feature of a dovetailed slide to let it spring but not move side to side. Another thing is I wonder if the inner spring is removable to give it both a soft and stiff setting????? With the grinding marks I would guess it to be early 20th century.






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    i really like that it looks really cool but i don't see it being all that useful maybe thats why they have disappeared

    i always enjoy your posts Rivett thanks for posting pictured of your tools

  3. #3
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    Rivett608:

    No maker's marks on yours, either?

    Definitely a cutie. Love those beautiful reliefs on the sides of the shank.

    John Ruth

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    I was just digging through some old tool files and found this..... a nice factory made Spring Tool..... this is from Machinery (magazine) May 1917 pg. 822.




  5. #5
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    Rivett608:

    Interesting! Especially the H-shaped block to be fitted into the lower part of the gooseneck, and held by the spring-loaded pin, when it is desired to have a "solid mount" for the tool.

    I had to puzzle over the drawing for a little bit before I realized that the H-shaped block is shown in a Plan view whereas the rest of the tool is shown in a Side view. The final picture makes this clear - it shows the H-shaped block in place on the tool.

    Has anyone actually seen an example of this tool?

    John Ruth

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    Some shaper texts talk about placing the cutting edge behind the pivot point to reduce chatter and dig-in. I think that is all these holders are doing, just rotated 90 deg. Not sure how meaningful the spring part is. I certainly can't see the 1/4" spring in the Progress holder resisting cutting forces, unless you're cutting plastic or something.

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    Lofty,

    You are looking at three available springs in that tool holder. First is the loop built into the holder itself. Second is the 1/2 inch spring bushing to be placed inside the built in loop spring. Finally, you have the 1/4 inch spring. Those can be pretty stout depending on the number of coils and the diameter of the wire. It looks to me like you have a great deal of adjustment to meet the needs of different situations.

  8. #8
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    FWIW ......armstrong , willard, williams, & shop made gooseneck tool holders are quite useful in my shop ...noticeable difference in straight in threading on Reed 1895 14 in , ( no factory compound ...rise /fall & xtraslide under xslide for taper attach. take the space ) thrds are cleaner ,like cutting w/ compound , & allow a heavier cut .
    also eliminates "dig ins " parting off on light hsm lathes..in fact , i also use them on 14 in reed & 14 in monarch A( circa 2000# )in preference to solid holders...
    useful for parting & slotting on my 16 in shaper , .....quieter & less chatter on down feed cutting keyway ,,,....
    as a test , i chucked a one in bar in the reed , used a 3/8 bit w/ a full width face , back rake & clearances & put a 60 deg point on the bar w/ a plunge cut at 144 rpm ...NO chatter ...this was a shop made holder....there was near 1/16 deflectiln , but when the point was approached , the deflection was not visible since the cut was minimal ....i have some question abt worring abt "truth "
    best wishes
    docn8as

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    I'm not saying they don't work, just questioning why they work.

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    What would a goose neck/spring parting tool look like are they forged steel or were elaborate holders ever made to take standard parting blades so depth could be adjusted?

  11. #11
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    gooseneck parting tool holders are made the same as forged solid parting tool holders XCEPT w/ a gooseneck head w/ the slot , which allows for flex..they take stndrd beveled parting blades ....armstrong viz #30 , #31, #32 , when gooseneck , are marked S31, S32 & S33.......williams are also marked w/ an S.....
    best wishes
    docn8as

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    Thanks I now have a picture in my head. I think one of these will be on my "to make" list

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    Default parting tool

    The goose neck parting tool that I have is the only parting tool I have ever seen that provides rake to the blade.The rake is small but probably aids the cutting.The wrinkle with it is that the center height is different when you extend the blade.I use interchangable flat washers to keep the cutting angles consistent.If you were using a wedge you would cancel the rake.

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    Quote Originally Posted by new_guy View Post
    What would a goose neck/spring parting tool look like are they forged steel or were elaborate holders ever made to take standard parting blades so depth could be adjusted?



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  17. #16
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    Default Shop made spring tool holder

    I just got this from ebay. I believe it is shop made and not from a tooling manufacturer. It is nicely made though. didn't pay much for it. It has most of the design features discussed in the above posts.

    here are some pics..
    resize-imgp2819.jpg

    resize-imgp2820.jpg

    resize-imgp2821.jpg
    Last edited by Metalo; 04-21-2011 at 10:43 AM. Reason: add pics

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  19. #17
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    That's sweet..... it almost has a Art Deco look to it..... kind of Streamlined.

    Thanks for sharing it.

  20. #18
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    Oh, yeah, that's a real winner! "Phil Barr" must have been a master machinist or toolmaker.

    The purpose of the vertical "key" on the left side of the tool is not clear from the photos. (Or, maybe I'm just having an "off day")


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