My "Pig in a Poke" Bridgeport auction win - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    The ways look in great shape. That's the most important part. Power feed, decent DRO's. Ya done way better than good!

    That's a bport for the rest of your life.

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by cb1 View Post
    Good to know. I'll probably forgo the riser.

    Thanks,

    cb1
    I would agree with Big B as far as the riser is concerned. We had a variety of mills in the shop where I worked. None had a riser, and none was ever needed. I've had a Bridgeport series I machine in my shop going on 20 years and have yet to have a need for a riser. Keep in mind that if you do go with a riser you're probably also going to need a power drawbar. The spindle nut will be 4" higher than it is now. You'll also need a power source for the drawbar, either air or electric.

    I don't know what type of shop you have, but adding a riser and power drawbar could also cause issues with head room.

  4. #43
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    I've posted this before but I love the 7" riser I put on my B-port. I'm taller than average and it makes seeing the work easier. No problem getting to the draw bar nut. It also moved the knee up to a less worn part on its ways. And I can keep my vise swivel base on all the time.
    Different strokes.

  5. #44
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    Place I worked at had a standard BP and one with an 8"riser. The one with the riser was noticeably more prone to chatter,and sometimes had to extend quill to reach job! Mine has a 4"riser which I really like. And I use my Autolock cutter chuck so rarely need to extend the quill.

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by TedinNorfolk View Post
    Place I worked at had a standard BP and one with an 8"riser. The one with the riser was noticeably more prone to chatter,and sometimes had to extend quill to reach job! Mine has a 4"riser which I really like. And I use my Autolock cutter chuck so rarely need to extend the quill.
    What's this "Autolock cutter chuck" you speak of,

    Thanks,

    cb1

  7. #46
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    This mill did not come with ANY tools, collets, R-8 anything. Therefore, I have a blank canvas as far as what to go with as far as tool holders etc.

    I'm not a fan of the draw bar setup and would like to consider a chuck of some type, but do not want a bunch of different setups. Would be nice to have one brand-style, etc.

    End mills (I did get a pile with this mill) and a small fly cutter comes to mind currently.

    Basically, what would have to have starting out with a BP and nothing but the empty spindle?

    Thanks,

    cb1

  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by maynah View Post
    I've posted this before but I love the 7" riser I put on my B-port. I'm taller than average and it makes seeing the work easier. No problem getting to the draw bar nut. It also moved the knee up to a less worn part on its ways. And I can keep my vise swivel base on all the time.
    Different strokes.
    You're lucky you're a bit taller. I'm only 5' 8" so I already have to wear my high heel shoes just to reach the spindle nut on my standard Bridgeport. It's bad enough wearing them in the shop. The wife is really embarrassed if I forget to change them when we go shopping.

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  10. #48
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    If your high heels aren’t like these you could revive a trend and get your self some 1970 s Platform shoes at your local vintage clothing or good will store store .
    Mens 1970's Platform Shoes - Google Search
    I never owned any so don’t know how they are for walking in or if they came with steel toes for shop use or not.
    Jim

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  12. #49
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    My Wells Index mill came with an Erickson QC 30 spindle.The nut was missing but lucked into two new ones on E-Bay.

    While looking for the nuts I saw quite a few B/Port Erickson QC spindles for sale.The prices were all over the place from $100.00 on up.Don't know whats available now but may be worth looking for.

  13. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by cb1 View Post
    This mill did not come with ANY tools, collets, R-8 anything. Therefore, I have a blank canvas as far as what to go with as far as tool holders etc.

    I'm not a fan of the draw bar setup and would like to consider a chuck of some type, but do not want a bunch of different setups. Would be nice to have one brand-style, etc.

    End mills (I did get a pile with this mill) and a small fly cutter comes to mind currently.

    Basically, what would have to have starting out with a BP and nothing but the empty spindle?

    Thanks,

    cb1
    My $.02....

    A set of R8 collets, good ones, Hardinge or equivalent in 1/16" increments. Buy used on eBay.

    A set of flycutters (not indexable cutters) with a couple each 1/2", 3/8", 5/16" square HSS lathe blanks for the fly cutters, eventually some brazed carbide. All can be had cheap from Shars or eBay.

    An Albrecht 1/2" chuck with JT6 taper, mounted to an arbor of decent provenance. Jacobs chucks can work, but it's a PITA constantly reaching for a chuck key, esp when you're making a hole on location. Center drill, pilot drill, drill, maybe an endmill, reamer. 8 or 10 tool changes. Way faster, more accurate and less irritating with a keyless chuck. Albrecht because they're good quality, a lot of them around so parts will be available for a long time. Available on eBay for $100 and up.

    Looks like you may need a drawbar, too. I think I have an extra, a long one, which also works if you ever get a right angle head for it. Pm me if you're interested. I know you're not a fan, but the alternatives run into big bucks. You'll get used to a drawbar, and with a 3/4" combination wrench handy on the knuckle, tool changes will be fast.

    Vise (s). 6" Kurt Anglock type works well. You don't need a swivel base to start, though it may be helpful later. Also available used. There are good imitations out there, maybe someone else can chime in - I don't know much about current offerings.

    Parallels: pieces cut from an 1/8" thick, 6" wide x 18" or so piece of annealed, ground both sides tool steel, bought new. Any width parallels you need can be easily made from it. They'll be soft and nick easily, but if you're careful and keep a stone handy to work the problems out, you'll be fine.

    An Indicol or equivalent, with a good test indicator. Unfortunately, there're a lot of junk imitations out there that are frustrating to use. You may have to buy the Indicol new to get anything good.

    And, if you don't have it already, a hold down kit from the usual suspects.

    Add as you go along - smaller chucks, em holders, or even go for the fancier stuff - power drawbar with proprietary tooling kit, but this will get you started.

  14. #51
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    As I recall Clarkson Autolock chucks were not very common in the U.S.A.
    clarkson auto lock milling chuck - Google Search
    Some people used them in Canada as well as a similar Dormer type that were used with threaded shank end mills .
    I have one of each with different tapers .
    Threaded shank end mills made by dormer Clarkson and others mostly from the U.K. as I recall.
    Cromwell Tools - Experts in Hand Tools, Power Tools and PPE

    More popular here now are the #25 collets that I think were at one time mainly from Europe
    COLLET SET KING Canada - Power Tools, Woodworking and Metalworking Machines by King Canada
    and the more versatile ER collets
    ER Milling Collets - Google Search

    Jim

  15. #52
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    neilho,

    Thanks for the information. Looks like the way to go. I did find the drawbar last night digging though a tray of parts. I will update as I go. I have the knee on the workbench right now as I had to get the knee lock shaft out as they buggered the end and pryed it of the splines, and the handle is missing. They went to town on the mill trying to free the knee.

    Anyway, scraped some paint off and then decided to strip off the paint and go down that rat hole.

    I will probably give it an Earl Scheib,

    cb1

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  17. #53
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    Now there's a name from the past. Don't forget the ways!

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