O.T: Awakening the Beast Part II (Moving the 1928 Lombard Model "T" Dump Truck)
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  1. #1
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    Default O.T: Awakening the Beast Part II (Moving the 1928 Lombard Model "T" Dump Truck)

    You may remember back in July I posted about awakening the 1928 Lombard model "T" dump truck. Well thanks to the amazing generosity of the Breton family we now have the 1928 Lombard model "T" dump truck tucked away in the Lombard shed along side the two steamers and the 10 ton gasoline powered Lombard.

    Our adventure started Thursday night when I made the 2-1/2 hour drive down to Herb's. With the flatbed scheduled to be in Vassalboro at 8:00 am the next morning spending the night at Herb's and driving only a little over an hour made sense. As it was Herb and I were on the road at 5:45 am so we could be there in plenty of time to prep and awaken the beast.

    Fortunately thanks to Paul's prep work the beast fired right up without a problem. After a bit of frantic tugging on the steering wheel and jigging back and forth we managed to clear the pole barn without crushing Paul's blueberry bushes. I can tell you.... it's near impossible to turn the wheels when its sitting still!

    Here is the link to a video of today's adventure:

    YouTube

    Anyway, by 8:20 am it was loaded and on its way. Special thanks to Brandon our trucking guy! Unfortunately his GPS led him astray. He had set his GPS to follow the shortest route. However the "shortest" route was down a gated logging road.

    Fortunately we found him and once at the museum we quickly had it unloaded and tucked away in the shed. This gave us a good opportunity to look the beast over. We have fuel problem which is either gunk in the carb or sediment and scale blocking off the line to the carb at the tank. The inline filter we installed earlier indicates that there quite a bit drifting around in the system. We also need to get the battery cables sorted out and the battery tucked away were its supposed to be. We tried out the dump body hoist but about 2,000 lbs of Lombard logging sled parts in the bed precluded raising it up too far. However, it worked excellent.

    dsc_8759.jpg

    Driving this beast is interesting. It has essentially a heavy four speed truck transmission with the reverse blanked-off. Reverse and forward are handled by a lever down on the floor by the drivers left foot. It does give you four forward and four speeds in reverse. However, its an awkward reach to say the least. Meanwhile the lever for the hoist is a big reach over on the other side of the gear shift which would have a short person struggling to depress the clutch and work the lever. Lets just say its funky and neat and keeps the driver busy.

    dsc_8789.jpg

    dsc_8803.jpg
    The track system is really cool. Tension is held by a big spring stretching clear across under the cab and pulling on fulcrums which apply tension to front sprocket bearing frames. The sprocket bearing frames are not mounted rigid to the chassis but can slide fore and aft via slides and gibs.

    Anyway, our last event of the season is our "Living History" days on October 5th and 6th. Its also our biggest event.

    In addition to all kinds of other stuff we will have the steam Lombard out running around as well as the 10 ton gasoline Lombard and the Lombard Model "T" dump truck.

    Best regards,

    Terry

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    With our last event of the year in the record books it was time to get some work done on the 1928 Lombard dump truck before Winter sets in. I am not sure why but I always like to be at the museum at least an hour before anyone else even if this means getting up at 3:00 am. to make the 3 hour drive in time. Maybe its the fact I can work by myself or maybe its just enjoying the calm and quite. It is beautiful place - off-grid, out in the middle of the Maine woods. I love walking into Machinery Hall still half dark in the morning light - the smell of the old machinery - oil, grease, wood. Swinging open the big door to the bays to let in the light. - the silence. Its hard to describe. Or maybe its more primevil -the walk around to make sure all is well, the ritual of priming the engine using the priming cups and then hitting the starter button and shattering the calm with the healthy bellow of an un muffled, large displacement motor.... that must be it!

    Anyway, early yesterday morning was such a day. With cold weather just around the corner we decided to do some more work on the 6 ton Lombard dump truck.Earlier I had re-built the Stewart-Warner vacuum tank so the goal was to get that installed so the beast could roam the museum grounds without the shame of stalling out on the hills.

    img_0240.jpg

    I had never worked on a vacuum tank before and was more than a bit nervous if it was going to work or not. The big question was the all important gaskets between the inner and outer tank and the lid. As vacuum tanks go its a big one. I couldn't find gaskets for it so a had to make them. To hedge my bet and used the old method of sealing the gaskets with shellac and assembled the whole mess while still wet.

    With the fuel tank drained Dave and I began the task of routing the new lines. Let me just say that this was an adventure! First of all the vacuum tank is mounted on the opposite side of the machine from both the carb and the outlet from the fuel tank. Second, Lombard packed a lot of large housings and whirring bits and pieces under the cab. Anyway, we got it done.

    After priming the vacuum tank and fixing one persistent leak it fired right up. In fact being the brave souls that we are we took it for spin down the hill and across the covered bridge and up the steep hill to the blacksmith shop then the long climb back to Government Road. It ran flawless!

    img_0241.jpg

    Next we worked on greasing the drive shaft joints and finding still more grease point! I think I have lost count of the number! We also test fit the mock-up for the new radiator cap. Last week one of my students reverse engineered it by scaling off period photographs and measurements of the opening. He then modeled it in Solidworks and 3D printed a mock-up. It fit and looks great! This week the files will be sent to the Advanced Manufacturing Center at the University of Maine where they will use their 3D metal printer to fabricate a finished cap and knob. We also test fit the side panels - these need handles but fit well. I kind of like the patina.

    img_0244-.jpg

    Even though the museum is officially closed for the season the grounds and trails are still open to the public so throughout the day we had a smattering of visitors wandering through and it was as always a pleasure to talk with them. At one moment when our frustration was peaked due to the leak we were trying to fix (bad fitting)we took a break by taking family for a ride on the big 10 ton Lombard tractor.

    img_0248.jpg

    All in all a very enjoyable and productive day!

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    Those units are so neat. I would not want to shake hands with the guy who was steering one of those all day!

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    Thanks Terry, great job on the save of the truck.very interesting write up and pics.I always appreciate these projects as a sort of living history lesson. Regards, Jim

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    Since the museum is a "Living History" museum and we demonstrate and operate
    our equipment, as it would have been used back in the the day, we do have to make some concessions
    to safety. When the Lombards are out and about there are many times we will have kids
    climbing on and sitting in the cabs etc. Its an experience we don't want to discourage.

    Thats how I got interested in this stuff way, way back in 1974 - sitting in the cab of Lombard
    gazing intently through the cracked glass and past the rusty tin cans capping the exhaust
    stacks dreaming about roaring through the snow carpeted forest.

    Anyway, to keep it safe we always, pull the keys and/or disconnect the battery when we have
    to leave a machine standing. However with the dump truck we have to be a bit more careful.
    The hoist lever is our main concern - it has limited movement and its very difficult to tell
    if its engaged or not until you fire-up the engine and let-out the clutch to move off only to
    discover that the dump body is going up.

    To prevent this I set my mind to designing a lock-out for the lever. Here is the design:
    hoist-lockout-plans.jpg

    Here is the finished lockout as fabricated by master craftsman Chris Rueby:

    hoist-lockout.jpg

    last year Chris fabricated an amazing live steam model of our Lombard which is the subject
    of an on-going series in Live Steam and Outdoor Railroading magazine as well as just completing a astounding
    live steam model of a Marion 91 steam shovel.

    Here is a link: The Daily News | New meets old: Model-maker creates miniature version of historic Le Roy steam shovel

    Of course as Don pointed out "a door hinge with a slot in one leaf that you simply flip into
    place would be about all you need"... I guess I might as well accept the fact that I will
    always think like an engineering and yes... make the simple complex.

    But it was fun!

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    Im surprised your insurers havent forced you to fence out the public.........one site here where a few years ago you could inspect the machinery is now behind not one ,but two layers of fencing......the second ,outer fence required by the risk assessor to prevent persons from climbing the inner fence.

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    Old Man Winter has swept in seemingly overnight. Though my thoughts are to simply stay warm and go into hibernation mode there is still work to be done - though thankfully from the warmth of a cozy shop. With the Lombards all tucked away we have turned out thoughts to some small but interesting projects.

    First on the list is the replacement radiator cover. The original went missing decades ago. If you recall in my last post we had test fit a 3D printed mock-up of the cover. The next step was 3D printing the patterns to be used by the foundry. Original plan was to have the pieces 3D metal printed. However, because of the size and thin cross section they felt that warping would be a issue so we have gone to plan "B".

    For plan "B" we 3D printed the cover and knob once again in PLA only this time we scaled it up slightly to take into account the shrink rate of the cast iron. We also added draft etc. Next step was filling, sanding & painting to get a nice smooth pattern. Next step is to send the patterns off to Peter - our foundry guy.

    img_0265.jpg

    Another project we wanted to tackle is getting the lights on the Lombard dump truck working. First we located a replacement for the dash light. As it turned out a reproduction of a dash light used on Ford Model "T" was a dead ringer for the original and fit perfect. (one more hole in the dash panel filled!)

    Replacing the missing light switch was more problematic. We simply could not find an original style switch. So.... Chris Rueby - one of our very talented volunteers offered to fabricate not just one but four switches for us. The extra's will be going to the family that has generously loaned us the Lombard tractors and will be used on two other machines they have in their collection.

    Chris is a true Master Craftsman! Here is a link to an article about some of his work:

    Chris Rueby

    My good friend Don has the only original switch that has survived and was very generous in providing us photos and measurements.With those in hand I developed a shop drawing for Chris to work from. Below is his progress to date. The face plates and knobs will be nickle plated to match the original.

    img_7397.jpg

    light-switch-shop-drawing.jpg

    dbkkbngafjfoilgj.jpg

    All fun stuff!

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    Good job, Terry.

    I noticed that TH checked the drawing, which calls the knob p/n 1042E-2, but calls it item 4 on the assembly drawing.

    I would not machine the plate's edge chamfer to a knife edge. Polishing will round and reduce the outside dimensions a bit. There would be less reduction if the chamfer is .115, for instance I would try to make the new plate match the original in that regard.

    And note that it is spelled nickel, not nickle. Nickel - Wikipedia

    I had a lot of respect for the checkers where I worked. They were highly paid, and earned it.

    Larry

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    Hello Larry,

    Point well taken. This was one of those drawings cranked out in snatches of time between students asking for help.
    I call it the "Mr. Harper, Mr. Harper" syndrome but its what I get paid for and enjoy doing.

    In regards to part numbers and reference to the assembly we use "item" designation for the
    assembly and cross reference that to the part number in the table. I have seen it both ways as long as
    its consistent.

    No excuse for nickle v nickel... just horrible one finger typing skills. Back a few years ago
    I would have had words with an employee who let that slip by! I remember well a cover sheet for a
    super market with a location map featuring the well known logo of our clients closest competitor.... they were not impressed! Needless to say it took a long, long time for that draftsman to live that one down!

    Here are the assemblies as of today:

    mlgppnnganjeeofk.jpg

    Chris is just waiting for a bar of nickel to arrive so he try plating the knobs and face plates.


    T.

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    And there was the program for the Annual Meeting of the Winchester Collector's Association with a Colt Lightning rifle on the cover. They hired a graphic designer who didn't know the difference. Fortunately, the President of the Association had a sense of humor.

  13. Likes Terry Harper liked this post

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