O.T. Reviving a 8 ton Lombard Dump Truck
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  1. #1
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    Default O.T. Reviving a 8 ton Lombard Dump Truck

    For sometime now Paul and Herb and I have been plotting to get Paul's 1928 Lombard model "T" Lombard re-awoken and hopefully placed on loan to the Maine Forest & Logging museum for awhile.

    Lombard had worked from very early on to try to break out of its traditional market of supplying heavy tractors to the northeast timber industry. While machines such their 10 ton model NW (and earlier 20 ton steamers) were well suited to hauling long trains of sleds heavily laden with logs or pulpwood over iced roads. their adaptability outside of that was more limited. While one publication listed a 10 ton gasoline powered Lombard as rated for a 12 bottom plow I doubt if any actually did. At the time the midwest farmers were fully dedicated to the sod busting steam and gasoline traction engines - such as Avery, Huber etc. while here in the northeast, with our much smaller farms, the Fordson, early IHC etc. dominated - besides, that 50 foot turning circle would have been fun to deal with small field with minimal headland!

    Thus in 1928 the Model "T" was just such an effort. However, the model "T" was aimed squarely at the construction and municipal markets - road construction and repair, heavy hauling and plowing.

    While following the standard Lombard pattern, it differed in a number of key features. The first of which was the use of boggie wheels rather than Lombard's traditional roller chain setup and using a four cylinder Hercules YXC-2 in place of the massive Wisconsin engines used in the 10 ton models. The Model "T" also featured a dump body and overall smaller dimensions and a slightly different track design. The model "T" other features included a four speed transmission setup that also provided four speeds in reverse!

    This particular machine was delivered to the Town of Gorham, Maine in 1928. Later, it was used by the Starbird Lumber Company. This is only one of two model "T" that have survived. Paul's family own's both.

    Anyway, the job now is to bring this beast back to life after a long slumber. Yesterday Herb and Paul paid a visit to Clement's Starter & Alternator in Carmel, Maine. Reggie had rebuilt the magneto and generator adding a manual advance as part of the work.

    Reggie's shop is one of those gems that is the salvation of lovers of old machines and a very enjoyable time warp. Here are two videos Herb shot:

    YouTube

    YouTube

    Once back at Paul's they worked to get the magneto installed and timed and the generator installed. They were hoping the beast would fire right-up but it wasn't to be. There is plenty of spark but..... no fuel.

    Next step (later this week) is a close look at the fuel system and carb. then.... fingers crossed.... it hopefully will come alive!


    1928-8-ton-dump-logo.jpg

    lombard-dump-truck.jpg

  2. #2
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    Those videos (especially the first) are very nice, thank you.

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    Very cool.

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    What I like about the videos is that they show old new England--ie mid- 20th century new England--at its best. Maybe old motor shop of anywhere, mid 20th century, at its best.

    What is the dump system on these? Cable? I think. Other mechanical? Hydraulic?

    Have I already mentioned regarding Lombard and Waterville--I think I might have--that I own an uncommon wood working jointer made and patented by the Waterville foundry? 1889 patent, as I recall. Here

    Photo Index - Waterville Iron Works - Philbrick 1889 patent | VintageMachinery.org

    are some photographs and information. I also own a wood working band saw made by them.

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    What is the dump system on these? Cable? I think. Other mechanical? Hydraulic?
    The hoist is a pinion and segment gear. There is a drive shaft driven by a PTO in the transmission
    that goes back to the gear box. When I go down later this week I will try to get some photos.
    Hopefully the beast will cooperate so we can move it about!

    That joiner is indeed a neat piece of history! The Waterville Iron Works did a ton of castings
    for Lombard. A few years ago there was an auction featuring a large assortment of patterns from
    the iron works. Apparently someone salvaged them from the local dump decades ago.

    Here is a link to a story about it:

    Century-old foundry parts are cast new roles — Living — Bangor Daily News — BDN Maine

    Best regards,

    Terry

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    IT'S ALIVE!!!

    Yesterday I made the long drive down to Paul's to see if we could awaken the beast.I think Paul and Herb would have had success the other day except one of the jets was plugged-up and a float was cracked - all of which Paul fixed during the week. Interestingly one of the floats was homemade. Its a Zenith model 77 which was discontinued back in the 40's. Thankfully Chris, one of our very talented Lombard crew members (currently building a live steam model of a huge Marion steam shovel) has offered to fabricate new floats.

    After a few backfires and one very, very impressive ball of flaming gas out the carb (we .... ummm... had the firing order reversed) and a few frantic moments trying to beat out the fire, the beast came to life after sitting silent and dormant for the last 20 years.

    After running it out into the sunlight we worked to adjust the timing and looked it all over for things to add to the "to-do-list" once its at the museum.

    No, the board is not a Lombard hood ornament, the original filler cover went missing a long time ago and replacing it is on the list.

    Its an interesting beast for sure and it really shares very little with its larger siblings - namely the 10 ton log haulers. The clutch is a standard off-the-shelf unit as opposed to Lombard's patented design and the transmission is mounted in-unit with the motor rather than being separate. The differential is a pinion drive rather than a worm drive and ring gear and the track lags are a totally different design.

    We didn't raise the bed since the thought of re-loading all the heavy logging sled parts in the back was not agreeable - so no photos of the hoist.

    At the moment it doesn't like to idle at low rpm so we will need to fiddle with carb a bit.

    I apologize for the quality of the video....a photographer I am not!


    Here is a video:

    YouTube

    img_0044.jpg

    img_0054.jpg

    img_0057.jpg

    img_0053.jpg
    Last edited by Terry Harper; 07-06-2019 at 02:49 PM.

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    Just so you know, the quality of the video is just fine. We get the picture and it's great! Thank you.

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    Thanks for the post and pics/video. Sounds wonderful to my ears. For many years I wanted to see the steam tracked tractor log hauler from Laona Wi. Never made it there to see it. Then a couple years ago at Symco Wi at a show, saw it not only in person but under steam and in motion. Can't recall if that was a Lombard or another build but right up there in the lumbering dept. Again thanks for your posts. Regards, John.

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    Hello John,
    That would have been a Phoenix. They used the early Lombard design with the upright cylinders
    and paid a royalty to Lombard for each one sold.


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