Old Large Worthington air compressor - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by magneticanomaly View Post
    A line from a LP head to the HP head is going to be air, not oil. If the gage face says oil pressure, I'd assume the gage was changed. Disconnect something and see what comes out.

    Intercooler P equal to receiver P means something wrong in the HP pump...bad valves, most likely. I would take all the heads off. I'm sure in addition to better access to clean valves, you will find other crud to clean out.

    Another thing to look at is the unloader. That is a device that holds the compressor valves open so it cannot pump, whenever receiver pressure is above set-point. Unlike an electric motor-driven compressor, yours does not stop and start.
    I disconnected the line and verified that it was an oil line. ( oil pressurized came out )HOWEVER I disconnected the wrong line that was right below it going to air compressor oil pressure. it appears that gage was replaced.. sooo, I'm right back where I started. I'm thinking the second stage valve/head will have to be pulled and the issue will show itself. with me bouncing from one project to the next, I'm making stupid mistakes. basically I should have just went forward with first instinct. Thanks for your reply to put me back on the right track. I'm not going to mess with the first stage cylinders at this point, I don't want to introduce another issue with human error along with making gaskets, parts are likely hard to come by or very expensive. This unit doesn't have that much value.
    And yes, I need to check out the unloader first now that you mention it.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bonduel, Wi
    Posts
    664
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    92

    Default

    I am learning from you but more pics of the intercooler and associated plumbing might help. Not sure if our terminology is same page. I had a 20-25 HP Leroi Dresser 800/880 pump. 3 cyl recip that was a Wabco design but was missing a few hard parts that I never did find on the loose. Wabco design was used in Railroad applications and have seen a number of large 3 cyl recips in that application. Some of these compressors are almost bullet proof as they were designed for extra hard service life. Worthington no doubt made them too? Not real up on these. That Leroi had an intercooler like a radiator cooling fins. Being I never did get that project going do to cost of parts I never learned much about the intercooler. My GD towable has a homemade oil cooler but originally had a separate oil cooler radiator that is MIA, Have also seen air coolers made very much like my homemade GD oil cooler. But mine is a screw machine a whole different animal with not much to share. Though I thought possible controls might be similar or at least operate similar.

    My rather weak understanding is the intercooler is indeed to cool the air. Objective is to cool the air below flashpoint of the oil. That is the purpose to my understanding though I have no real experience with the intercooler. A friend who was a road mechanic for Atlas Copco years ago told me you need an accurate air gauge on the intercooler. That it will tell you a lot. Chances are your valves are the problem if there is one. 28-32 lbs is what the intercooler should have on it for most Atlas compressors according to my friend. If you have too much air it is on your high compression cyl valves. Below 28 lbs is pointing to low pressure valves. Sounds to me you were on the right path to begin with. If you can get the valves straightened out the pump is probably bullet proof like the Leroi/Wabco design. They were made for extreme hard use and built accordingly. But I would first make sure your gauge is telling you the truth and it very well may be already. Yours compressor has me excited. I love the technology. You may have to search a little but you may find a few parts for you Continental engine cheaper than the first place you find. These tractor guys are pretty sharp and can help. I am glad you live far far away from me or I would be trying to think of a way to swap you something like one headache for another. But even I won't go to all the way to Texas for this. The parts availability is what really deters me from old compressors but I have moments of weakness for them. Keep on trucking and keep us informed. Regards, John.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by handsome devil View Post
    I am learning from you but more pics of the intercooler and associated plumbing might help. Not sure if our terminology is same page. I had a 20-25 HP Leroi Dresser 800/880 pump. 3 cyl recip that was a Wabco design but was missing a few hard parts that I never did find on the loose. Wabco design was used in Railroad applications and have seen a number of large 3 cyl recips in that application. Some of these compressors are almost bullet proof as they were designed for extra hard service life. Worthington no doubt made them too? Not real up on these. That Leroi had an intercooler like a radiator cooling fins. Being I never did get that project going do to cost of parts I never learned much about the intercooler. My GD towable has a homemade oil cooler but originally had a separate oil cooler radiator that is MIA, Have also seen air coolers made very much like my homemade GD oil cooler. But mine is a screw machine a whole different animal with not much to share. Though I thought possible controls might be similar or at least operate similar.

    My rather weak understanding is the intercooler is indeed to cool the air. Objective is to cool the air below flashpoint of the oil. That is the purpose to my understanding though I have no real experience with the intercooler. A friend who was a road mechanic for Atlas Copco years ago told me you need an accurate air gauge on the intercooler. That it will tell you a lot. Chances are your valves are the problem if there is one. 28-32 lbs is what the intercooler should have on it for most Atlas compressors according to my friend. If you have too much air it is on your high compression cyl valves. Below 28 lbs is pointing to low pressure valves. Sounds to me you were on the right path to begin with. If you can get the valves straightened out the pump is probably bullet proof like the Leroi/Wabco design. They were made for extreme hard use and built accordingly. But I would first make sure your gauge is telling you the truth and it very well may be already. Yours compressor has me excited. I love the technology. You may have to search a little but you may find a few parts for you Continental engine cheaper than the first place you find. These tractor guys are pretty sharp and can help. I am glad you live far far away from me or I would be trying to think of a way to swap you something like one headache for another. But even I won't go to all the way to Texas for this. The parts availability is what really deters me from old compressors but I have moments of weakness for them. Keep on trucking and keep us informed. Regards, John.
    Yes, I think I was on right path at first with the second stage head/valve. I mistakingly thought there was oil in intercooler because gage said oil and when I disconnected to confirm, I did the gage next to it that was indeed oil pressure for the compressor. I believe you are right on what that gage should read. I have a fresh set of tires on it, I can pack the wheel bearing when your heading this way. My extra shop compressor is a Leroi. I had second stage problem with it and it was just broken springs on that brass ring valve. Those things are made very heavy and " bullet proof" as you mention. It has a intercooler as you mentioned and it's a very quite unit for what it is. ( 5 hp 80 gallon ) but not your typical house compressor. It took about 45 minutes to pull that head, replace springs and make a gasket back to running. Very simple set-up. we have a week of nice weather coming up. Was in high 20's over the weekend which is cold for us. Lots of projects on the menu....Mike

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default

    Looks like the unloading piston was stuck, It's located on top of the head and made of brass, it was stuck in the down position that none of the shiny brass was hardly visible. Attached is a picture of it after getting it broke loose. The spring below looks good and the valve seat "sounds" good as I activate. I will polish this up and reinstall. I have to wait for the exhaust" cast" to harden before I start it up and see what the pressures look like.20190212_151408.jpg

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bonduel, Wi
    Posts
    664
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    92

    Default

    So are we making air yet? Hope you continue on this project. Almost wish you hadn't posted pics of it as now I think I need a recip if one falls in my lap.

    Could you do me a favor and tell me what the model of the Worthington compressor is? Been looking on line for a book on it and similar models but not sure just how many 3 cyl Worthington made found some that could be the right model. With gun collecting I have found if you buy the book first the rifle will follow. But you can do a lot of research in parts availability if you get the book first so you know what to look for. I cannot believe how many different compressors Gardner Denver made over the years and how so far I have not found any for mine or the other one I was working on. I can't even find a parts catalog for mine or a owners manual for the one I worked on. It is like finding steam locomotive parts maybe worse. Just have to find the right person to meet up with I guess. Please keep us informed of your success on this old compressor. Regards, John.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    North Carolina
    Posts
    1,883
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    142
    Likes (Received)
    355

    Default

    The radiator grill on your compressor looks like the
    front end of a Worthington golf course tractor.
    Jacobsen-Worthington-Johnson had a merger at some time.

    -Doozer

  7. #27
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bonduel, Wi
    Posts
    664
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    92

    Default

    We were very close on intercooler parameters. I have a manual for these machines now and the book says 26 to 30 lbs would be proper operating pressure on the intercooler. The 75 cfm machine from this era had slightly higher parameters. Should be a safety valve on top of the intercooler to protect from over pressure. Picked up Master Parts Manual for these portable air compressors from Worthington and last date listed is 1956. So ought to be in the ball park.

    I know this thread may be dead but am hoping OP comes back with a success story. So glad this thing is in TX and to far from me to be a threat. Regards, John.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Rhode Island
    Posts
    122
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    This looks like a good compressor for sandblasting. Even if you don't use it much it would seem it doesn't need much use as it works after not being run for 20+ years. Put gas in it when you want to use it, run it dry when done. Keep it under cover, and just put a battery in it when you want it. Had a 4 cyln. continental on a big log splitter/cordwood saw and ran it only in the fall for years. Never any trouble.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Bonduel, Wi
    Posts
    664
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    92

    Default

    You are correct WDtom if you keep the machines under a roof they will last much longer even with minimum use. Same for tractors left outside in all weather. An ounce or two of prevention is worth pounds of cure.

    I am not sure of the why of my interest in compressors but it is an itch for sure. The problem is parts availability. Same for your old recips out in the shop. Many of the companies are no longer in business or merged 30 years ago x3. Like machine tools you can improvise and build some of the parts. But it becomes a loosing battle unless your incredibly dedicated and have a lot of knowledge on what will work. Currently working on two Gardner Denver portables one from 1967 and 1973. Try finding separator filters. Or piston spring and rings for the inlet {unloading} valve. The compressor in this thread is an additional 10 yrs old. These old recips are almost dinosaurs if you need hard parts. You might be able to find rings but bearing might have to be custom made along with most your gaskets and springs. Older shop compressors often rot out in bottom of the reservoir. My GD project not so as they held ATF in the reservoir so the tanks are very clean or supposed to be. But if I get mine running it will be more useful than another spare tractor or some other infernal combustion engine to keep running.

    All this comes with the territory like old machine tools and the challenge is there if you want it. Something about doing CPR and get a few more years out of some of this stuff. Sure wish OPIE would come back with an update. He was very close by the sounds of it. Am curious if he pulled all the heads or not? Regards, John.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Iowa
    Posts
    3,056
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    54
    Likes (Received)
    335

    Default

    Hi Gents!

    First off, I'll amend Kris (Dalmatiangirl)'s note... this is not a 'small' Worthington, it's a TINY one. I have a 'small' single cylinder Worthington compressor that has about an 8" bore and 24" stroke... Worthington's 'average' compressors weighed over 80,000lbs.

    Second... the unloader mechanisms varied in operation on many compressors, yours being portable may have some 'features' that others don't. The 3-cyl 2-stage was not uncommon for railroad use- they'd frequently be direct-coupled to the opposite end of a loco's prime mover... and the unloader would bypass operation by forcing the intake valves open and dumping pressure at the outlet. Once pressure fell below 'cut in', the valves would be released, and the outlet vent closed (in that sequence). The sequence was that way, so that any condensation that appeared in the cylinders, intercooler, etc., would be blown out the unloader's vent.

    Pull the unloader piping carefully, then lift off each head, clean and inspect the valves, scrub crud out of the heads, and off the piston tops, measure the spring heights, and reassemble. You'll probably find that a good cleaning there, plus cleaning out the unloader plumbing, will wake it up substantially.

    Oil pressure gauges plumbed to the crankcase can refer to more than one thing. The crankcase MAY be fitted with a pickup and oil pump, in which case, you MAY be seeing lube pump pressure. On SOME compressors, the lubrication is done by very clever splash-gravity distribution. In yet others, lubrication is done by siphon... where a pickup tube in the sump leads to strategic points above bearings, into the rods, etc., and then there's a discharge vent that leads to (typically) the compressor's intake, and when in operation, compression pressure results in the oil being forced through lubrication channels to outlet side... and the differential pressure is what forces active lubrication. in this case, the pressure gauge simply reads crankcase pressure... which 'we hope' results in proper lubricant flow.

    It's not unusual for someone to substitute an oil pressure gauge where lower-pressure air needs to be monitored. Pressure is pressure.

    Oh, and the unloader... typically, on engine-driven compressors, it's not unusual for the engine's throttle or governor to have componentry that forces the engine to idle down. That signal is oftentimes a tube off the unloader, that causes the governor spring to be overridden. Sometimes, the governor has an air-piston in it... and others, the unloader has a lever arm with a chain that pulls the throttle to idle.

    There's also SOME compressors that, when faced with a well-discharged load, will drop out of two-stage mode, and run single-stage. it's a little more complex in the plumbing department, but not too bad, as long as you realize what it's supposed to do.

    Be on the lookout for this kind of thing.

  11. Likes dalmatiangirl61, handsome devil liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
2