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  1. #1
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    Default Old videos

    Plenty of the good old stuff on this guys channel.
    From the steel rule to shaping/planing to foundry work and burlesque!



    Enjoy.

  2. #2
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    Nice video.

    What a complicated machine to run!

    Hurray, for the use of safety glasses/goggles!

    After watching this I can see why shapers are obsolete. Pretty darn slow process.

  3. #3
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    Nice goggles. I've never seen a film of this vintage where the operator used any kind of personal safety protection.

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    Not such a complicated machine to run really,Frank. They are just making a right meal of it-which makes it seem complicated! Also I wouldn't dream of using wood as packing-especially in that context!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank R View Post

    Pretty darn slow process.
    Oh Yay. But sometimes you just have to be patient.

    Spent Tuesday afternoon knocking of a couple of pairs of 150 x 25 mm camber setting plates for a racing BMW saloon car out of tool eating stainless steel on my 10" Elliot.

    Lord knows what the material actually was but it sure wasn't what it said on the ticket. Trying to do them on the Bridgeport as planned cost me a HSS cutter after under 1/8" of cut and decent quality insert didn't last much longer. Didn't help that the customer revised the design from 6 mm thick running down to 4 mm the narrow way to 3.5 mm thick running down to 2 mm the narrow way after the material had been got. Which not only made for creative mounting but also implied I was gonna get through a lot of cutters on the mill making the requisite pile of chips.

    Nice sharp cutter with 1/2 inch or so radius end in the shaper ploughed through them at 85 strokes per minute with around 0.5 mm depth of cut and 0.15 mm feed. Chips coming off just the cool side of blue. Got away without re-touching the edge. Finish was awesome. Not quite polishing would spoil but close.

    Seeing the video I lust after those powered set-up feed and all external stroke setting arrangements.

    Drilling the holes cost me a three re-sharpenings before I finally accepted that the material had to be worked at silly slow speeds. Like 100 rpm being really too fast for a 12 mm drill. At least I twigged that before wrecking a bandsaw blade whilst taking out the central clearance space on the Startright vertical.

    When you have to file at half speed for final finishing you've got material issues.

    In retrospect I'm impressed by how the Rapidor donkey saw coped with cutting the original stock. Sometimes slow is the only way.

    Worst thing with a shaper on auto feed is finding things to do in the 10 minutes (in this case) or so each cut takes.

    If Mr Race Car Prep customer wants more he's getting alloy and liking it!

    Clive

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    Nice shaper in the film but I hope the operator wasn't on piece work ! I think he was setting the flat finishing tool with a feeler under one corner as we used to do when planing much bigger work, tables etc. It gives you a nice pinstripe finish and the very slight ridges make it easier to slide heavy items around the table.

    Regards Tyrone.

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