ot----Chernobyl graphite
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  1. #1
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    Default ot----Chernobyl graphite

    yep---its the real deal

    Chernobyl nuclear event occurred April 1986

    one year later corporation"M"--4 miles from my operation purchased 20+ metric tonnes --grade B nuclear graphite--which was stored in rail car just outside of 30 km exclusion zone at time of reactor 4 incident

    well-plans change--and M corp did a deal with Glassmaster Hank--local creator of Mount St Helens volcanic glass for the graphite---and he has around 600 lbs remaining which he offers for sale--zero radioactivity assured--

    photo is of 10x10x3.5 in slab --if interested please send pm with contact number which I will relay to Hank

    also imaged is note from First Lady Nancy Reagan--she acquired dozens of Hanks glass creations molded in graphite for ornaments and gifts--years prior to Chernobyl
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 100_1252.jpg   100_1251.jpg   100_1253.jpg   100_1255.jpg  

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    What is the price?

    Might be good for electrolytic rust removal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank R View Post
    What is the price?

    Might be good for electrolytic rust removal.
    expect to have pricing within 2 days

    jh

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    What possible use could it be for electrolytic rust removal?

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    WTF would you do with it period?

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    What possible use could it be for electrolytic rust removal?
    Electrodes.

    From my understanding, steel electrodes need to be cleaned regularly. Graphite ones do not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizingkid View Post
    WTF would you do with it period?
    Lay a slab flat on a table. Then place your coffee mug on top. Will keep it warm.

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    local photographic supply company found out cheap Birch plywood from 1000's of miles away was slightly radioactive causing fogging issues with photographic film
    .
    basically the trees in the area absorbed higher than normal radioactive stuff and it was in the wood. didnt glow in the dark or anything you would need a gieger counter to measure.
    .
    also story of in South America at a junk yard owner saw a glowing small metal piece and took it home to show family. turned out it was radioactive used in medical scanner to treat cancer patients and normally it was in a lead box with small door to let out radioactive stuff for localized cancer treatment. whole family had serious radioactive exposures. not sure if all slowly died but radation poisoning aint a painless way to go. no cure once exposed enough
    .
    many big junk yards have gieger counters just for that now to scan trucks. border petrol got scanners that can tell if a human driver took radioactive stuff for medical scans and if still in the persons body. wont let you through the border if your radioactive.

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    The trash burner/power plant I worked at had "radioactivity detectors" through which all trucks had to pass through on their way to the tipping floor.

    Our biggest problem was "medical wastes" from the hospitals. Not infrequently the trucks would be held up while a remediation team came out and went through the truck bag by bag item by item until the offending radioactive something was found.

    Certainly hazardous pay rating for that. Imagine all the scalpels, needles, even blood-soaked bandaging and sponges. And all had to be examined with hand-held detectors.

    The biggest culprit was usually an empty bottle of radioactive fluid used in cancer therapy. A FOUR OUNCE glass bottle usually with a black screw cap. If the cap was not on it then the cap would have to be found too.

    Even finding the something was no reprieve. There might be a second something.

    Joe in NH

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    What possible use could it be for electrolytic rust removal?
    Quote Originally Posted by crrmeyer View Post
    Electrodes.

    From my understanding, steel electrodes need to be cleaned regularly. Graphite ones do not.
    The solution stay clean as well and you can see the condition of the part as the process proceeds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    What possible use could it be for electrolytic rust removal?
    The water doesn’t develop the rust bubble funk on the top of the tank.

    If you use a metal electrode the process creates what looks like a bubble on pizza cheese that just makes a nasty mess. If you’re using a very large tank the bubble can, potentially, allow escaping hydrogen to accumulate to potentially dangerous levels (I say potentially because I’ve never heard of it actually happening, but could).

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    Quote Originally Posted by crrmeyer View Post
    Electrodes.

    From my understanding, steel electrodes need to be cleaned regularly. Graphite ones do not.
    So where does the rust go?

    I thought the whole point was to transfer the rust from cathode to anode.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    local photographic supply company found out cheap Birch plywood from 1000's of miles away was slightly radioactive causing fogging issues with photographic film
    .
    basically the trees in the area absorbed higher than normal radioactive stuff and it was in the wood. didnt glow in the dark or anything you would need a gieger counter to measure.
    .
    also story of in South America at a junk yard owner saw a glowing small metal piece and took it home to show family. turned out it was radioactive used in medical scanner to treat cancer patients and normally it was in a lead box with small door to let out radioactive stuff for localized cancer treatment. whole family had serious radioactive exposures. not sure if all slowly died but radation poisoning aint a painless way to go. no cure once exposed enough
    .
    many big junk yards have gieger counters just for that now to scan trucks. border petrol got scanners that can tell if a human driver took radioactive stuff for medical scans and if still in the persons body. wont let you through the border if your radioactive.
    Scale house on freeway have same.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwearing View Post
    So where does the rust go?

    I thought the whole point was to transfer the rust from cathode to anode.
    Part of the rust is converted from Ferrous oxide (red rust, Fe203) to Ferric Oxide (Black Rust, Fe304) which is similar to red rust, but tends to be more mechanically stable, and can be painted over.

    Ferric Oxide will revert to ferrous oxide in time - painting slows this down considerably.

    Some of the ferric oxide goes to solution which can plate out on the other electrode, or on the bath surface "rust" in combination with the oxygen in the air to form the "red bubbles" frequently seen.

    The biggest advantage of a carbon electrode is that it does not accumulate the layer of chemical and rust which impedes current transfer.

    When I do electrolytic rust decomposition using (usually) a piece of scrap steel, about once a day I have to scrape or otherwise remove this chemical and rust from the electrode to keep the reaction going well. Were I to use a graphite electrode, I'm told that this is not necessary. Model A Ford Garage ~ Carbon Anode Electrolytic Rust Removal Method

    Vince Falter has a WEALTH of information on this and many other aspect of Model A and V8 Ford.

    My son is currently doing work on his Toyota Truck. I remind him that doing either electrolytic or chemical rust removal/conversion methods, one leaves behind when converted the PERFECT chemical attachment points for additional oxygen - which is why in simply the time from bath to cleaning to coating, one can start to see the "bloom" of red rust.

    Sandblasting, on the other hand, "disrupts" mechanically these attachment points, certainly makes new ones, but not necessarily perfect ones. Rust bloom can take up to a couple of hours depending on the humidity and handling.

    Joe in NH

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    Quote Originally Posted by jwearing View Post
    So where does the rust go?

    I thought the whole point was to transfer the rust from cathode to anode.
    The point is to reverse the electrolytic reaction that caused the initial oxidation (rust). As long as the reversal of that reaction is accomplished the rust will be released from the cathode.

    Where the rust goes is, mostly, a function of the anode material. If the anode is inert (graphite, gold, platinum, lead, etc...) the particulate leaving the cathode doesn’t have anywhere to go and falls to the bottom of the tank as wee bits of rust free iron/steel.

    If the anode is reactive (most common metals) the electrolysis process is hyper accelerating the natural oxidation process. The anode is actually rusting away super fast and the reaction is removing the rust from the cathode as a side effect.

    That nasty mess from using a reactive anode is not only unnecessary, it reduces the effectiveness of the electrolyte and all the excited, and highly reactive, particulate that precipitates from the funk bubble gets on your newly cleaned object and causes new rust to form almost immediately on removing it from the tank. It also gets in the nooks and crannies of the object and unless you clean the object with sufficient force to dislodge it the particulate will bond to the object and you’ll have to abrade it to remove it (or run it through the tank again).

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    Wow, you never know where a thread will go! Some good stuff here on electrolytic rust conversion/removal.
    they use graphite for EDM sinker electrodes, arc furnace electrodes, mounds for casting metal, thousands of uses.


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