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  1. #1
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    Default ot---gundrilling with french vanilla

    so--topic of this thread is drilling 7/16 inch bore thru 35 inch long Moore jig borer spindle--thru which draw bar will be inserted to seat iso 30 tooling ground to Moore taper

    spindle is R-60 hardness

    my first attempt using Botek 27 inch length gundrill and sulfulated squirt can cutting fluid was characterized by 2 inch penetration at which point the carbide drill tip exploded--fragment analysis demonstrated no injury to 4 facet cutting tip but binding of flank resulting in twist breakage at silver solder junction


    so--I tuned a wagner 700 psi airless paint power unit and milled 3/8 inch
    window in side of drill driver hub--which seats in morse taper 3/4 inch solid socket-- a momentary foot switch pulses cutting fluid to drill

    drill requires snug delrin bushing positioned 1/2 inch from spindle entry

    the real discovery in this undertaking is use of espresso mix french vanilla concentrate diluted with tap water--this fluid has thus far allowed spindle penetration of 16 inches with no adverse consequence other than minor expected cutting edge dulling---I purchased 20 identical drills anticipating destruction of 19 ------------- each new drill is good for about 2 inch depth at which point chirping begins as dulled cutting edge searches for purchase--and immediate removal from service--I will regrind later on walter 8 axis unit

    so analysis of french vanilla extract must incorporate minimum of 35% ethyl alcohol --statute requirement of FDA
    to this the flavor chemists at Beck's add propylene glycol --
    I had on hand a dozen 5 gallon containers of mostly empty Beck's concentrate
    of variety of flavors--to which tap water was added

    drill progress thru R60 steel is two inches/hour --flavor mixed fluid allowing increased progress and reduced breakage

    so is this amateurish happening a legitimate breakthru in metalworking fluids--to truly clean and green?--likely not, but for the moment methodology facilitating a formidable undertaking



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    That looks like a real mess. All the sugars and other ingredients in that stuff will become a nightmare to deal with as it begins to deposit and build up in those hard to reach areas of the machine. Even the not-so-hard to reach areas will be a constant battle. Then your shop will be overrun with all the little critters that want to dine on the residue. You might be better off sourcing the active lubricants you want individually and mixing them yourself

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    [QUOTE=Spruewell;3400954]That looks like a real mess.

    agree with the mess comment, but----shop rats keep invertebrate population under control
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHOLLAND1 View Post
    agree with the mess comment, but----shop rats keep invertebrate population under control
    I think you're quite mad. Which is the best sort of mad.

    Not at all clear how you decided on the vanilla extract, but I imagine there's a large number of folks here who would have suggested bacon fat instead. With both options you could have opened a Diner and Malt shop with whatever was left over.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spruewell View Post
    That looks like a real mess.
    Quote Originally Posted by JHOLLAND1 View Post
    agree with the mess comment, but----shop rats keep invertebrate population under control
    Clever little rodents didn't set out to make enemies, but unfortunately, various "invertebrates", bacteria, and viri return the favour. Not a cycle one wants to disregard.

    Enter the "glue trap", as it catches the newbies too low in mass to yet trip a reg'lar trap onct mama has done so, teats removed from the scene.

    Bait? Salvaged bottle top of ordinary water, one popped pop-corn kernal. Used in pairs, even the Evil Kneival wannabees take the glue.

    PS: More than one way for securing those tapers at the face. No drawbar involved.

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    To be honest, I'd use a high sulfer or high chlorine, neat cutting oil. Those seem to work acceptably with carbide inserts on high-hardness steels when I'm not cutting dry.

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    Around 1961, I saw in an old book a suggestion that oil of wintergreen (AKA methyl salicylate) is useful as a cutting fluid for hand engraving silver. I tried it and it probably did help. Plus, it smelled great. Now I wonder what Torani sugar free vanilla syrup coffee flavoring would do in that application.

    Larry

    dsc02026.jpg dsc02027.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Rand View Post
    To be honest, I'd use a high sulfer or high chlorine, neat cutting oil. Those seem to work acceptably with carbide inserts on high-hardness steels when I'm not cutting dry.
    IF... one were to be modifying at the face of the spindle for a non-drawbar retention system.. holes would want threaded - a challenge, to be sure. But they'd also be right SHORT holes, served more easily with solid carbide, and not as large in diameter.

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    Is the material too hard for HSS,then?

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    Quote Originally Posted by TedinNorfolk View Post
    Is the material too hard for HSS,then?
    Not really. There is HSS, there is "other" HSS , there is even not-really-HSS for scarcity of Iron in it. British invention. For knives and forks, initially.

    Solid carbides are just cheap, available, and damned STIFF. Good at their job, IOW. Especially for SHORTER holes a face-retention rig would want 'stead of a looooooong drawbar overly subject to stretch or twist fail in any case. Sub 7/16" and mebbe 24" long, wrench to threads?

    So why bother?

    Well. d'you know "mountains"? Meant to be climbed. Because they are THERE.

    Deep holes, hard material? Much the same.

    I mean, c'mon?

    Denis is an MD. He can't just go off deep-hole drilling a live human's work-hardened arse for insertion of brains. Got's to experiment on passive metal.

    First.



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    Ive got to ask, why did you not contact a gun barrel manufacturer and have the material drilled for you in a softer state, then harden and ream/hone the inside to size? Barrel makers routinely drill 30" long holes a lot smaller than 7/16". I think there is one in Wahington and several in Montana probably in driving distance.

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    Default the handshake

    for millennia opposing digging teams dedicated to tunneling exchange handshakes upon breakthrough

    similar celebratory satisfaction was experienced as the 33 inches of R60 drill path was completed

    major concern regarding path drift at breakthrough--no destruction of carbide drill tip occurred--estimate coaxial disparity at 10 -12 thousandths
    drill sequence required 18 inch penetration from splined end and 15 inch from taper socket

    drawbar is 36 inch 7/16-14 all thread--some resistance to passage of rod was remedied by lapping with application of valve grinding cmpd to all thread and lapping at 400 rpm---drilling occurred at 80 rpm

    questions asked why I did not contract out this job---well, metal working disciplines are voyages of discovery--and this event qualifies
    spindle hardness of R60 would likely result in job turn down by deep drill shop ---reason--no gun drill maker recommends drilling metal of hardness beyond 50 Rc

    my drill cost was $300 usd--and I will sell the majority of bits after I regrind
    out of 20 new drills 17 were used--3 totally destroyed--remaining 14 suitable for regrind

    an important refinement in method evolved--retracting drill every 1/4 inch of penetration, purging cavity with compressed air then filling cavity with CRC foam thread cutting compd followed by repeat drill cycle using water

    CRC product formed emulsion which adhered to metal and minimized tool breakage--also faster penetration at times like cutting delrin--
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    Quote Originally Posted by JHOLLAND1 View Post
    questions asked why I did not contract out this job---well, metal working disciplines are voyages of discovery--and this event qualifies
    Mad as ever, Jackson. And a treasure to PM's diverse community, for it!

    Good on yah, and well done!

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    Propylene glycol boils at 370*F. That might of helped.......


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