ot----incandescent tubing------russian style
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  1. #1
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    Default ot----incandescent tubing------russian style


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    I will need to try this with mild steel. The SS may be easier due to thermal conductivity.

    Do you know the reason for "changing tools"? Roughing and finishing?

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    Do you know the reason for "changing tools"? Roughing and finishing?[/QUOTE]

    second forming tool had significant loss of contact mass which possibly
    allowed improved radius in workpiece--russian language barrier in narration
    is a handicap here

    my impression of russian shop methods is of innovation --usually something novel in every video

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    Quote Originally Posted by JHOLLAND1 View Post
    Do you know the reason for "changing tools"? Roughing and finishing?
    second forming tool had significant loss of contact mass which possibly
    allowed improved radius in workpiece--russian language barrier in narration
    is a handicap here

    my impression of russian shop methods is of innovation --usually something novel in every video [/QUOTE]

    I did note that the second tool quickly glowed red it's self and conformed to the part radius. Hence my use of the "finish tool" description.

    Languages? I barely make it with American English. ;-)

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    Back in the 90's a firm in Norwich had a single spindle cam auto (screw machine) set up to do exactly that necking operation on Inconel tubes about/ish 5/16 dia

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    Quote Originally Posted by CalG View Post
    I will need to try this with mild steel. The SS may be easier due to thermal conductivity.

    Do you know the reason for "changing tools"? Roughing and finishing?
    I read/speak Russian, since it was taught in schools as obligatory (second) language back in USSR times to kids from the age of 11-12

    He said he changed to the smaller size tool to be able to roll the lip for a hose clamp more easily on the smaller diameter end, nothing more, people in the comments are quite skeptical about the whole process, so don't judge all Russians from the stuff you see in this vid

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    Machinery magazine showed similar work being done in the 1960's IIRC by Eastern bloc
    countries.

    One experiment showed using a piece of tubing, held in the spindle of a horizontal mill.
    Person applying torch to spinning tube, then forcing cone shaped tool over piece to form.

    tool held in block on table, power feed used to feed tool.

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    Judging by the speed of the several calipering measurements seen during the operation, zip zip zip,I suspect that this might have been shot speeded up, suggesting that the actual feed rate is significantly slower than what appears. Until the final minute of the vid, I didn't quite get what the specific purpose of the whole operation was - language barrier.

    In this jumbled miscellany of a YouTube,
    YouTube
    there is a similar necking process going on at around 2:00.

    -Marty-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Feldman View Post
    Judging by the speed of the several calipering measurements seen during the operation, zip zip zip,I suspect that this might have been shot speeded up,
    No, It seems he did not want to ruin his calipers by having them contact red hot steel for any longer than needed. Get in and out as quick as possible, besides what he was making is not exactly a tight tolerance part.

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