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  1. #41
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    "The engine is probably a pre-"detroit diesel" badged "General Motors Diesel"."

    That comment jogged my memory. It should have GM or Detroit cast into the blower housing. Only noticed that on the old 2=-53 welder after we found out how old it was.

  2. #42
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    Great stories Joe. I know the square root of zilch about Diesel engines but I was fascinated. When's the book coming out. Regards Tyrone.

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    There is an old 50's movie with trucks like that. Wages of Fear. A good film. Much about the truck. Nothing like big Diesels, use to be my life. (merchant marine engineer)

  5. #44
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    Years ago before 9-11 I escorted a OS load out to the Palo Verde nuke plant west of Phoenix and had to wait outside the secure plant area to escort the empty truck/trailer back to town. Setting out where we could wait was a Winton stationary engine ,as I recall a straight 8. Big enough that it had a catwalk several feet off the ground to access the top of the engine.Placard stated it had been used in the Yuma Az. citrus groves to generate electricity to power the big fans that kept air moving on freezing nights. Was used in the 40s-50s and some how was donated and ended up at the nuke plant.

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnEvans View Post
    Years ago before 9-11 I escorted a OS load out to the Palo Verde nuke plant west of Phoenix and had to wait outside the secure plant area to escort the empty truck/trailer back to town. Setting out where we could wait was a Winton stationary engine ,as I recall a straight 8. Big enough that it had a catwalk several feet off the ground to access the top of the engine.Placard stated it had been used in the Yuma Az. citrus groves to generate electricity to power the big fans that kept air moving on freezing nights. Was used in the 40s-50s and some how was donated and ended up at the nuke plant.
    A Winton is not that tall to require a catwalk. The heads are at about eye level. A Winton 8 cylinder would not be an oversize load. In fact a Winton of any size would not be oversize or weight. What would it have done at Palo Verde? The Diesel gensets there are Cooper-Bessemer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    .. The Diesel gensets there are Cooper-Bessemer.
    Here's a quite decent photo of one .. earning its crust in Poland, and to do with fossil fuel, so I don't have to keep an eye out for black helicopters from the glows-in-the-dark crowd:.

    http://krio-serwis.pl/sites/default/..._zam/pic02.jpg...

    Bill

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    Quote Originally Posted by beech View Post
    There is an old 50's movie with trucks like that. Wages of Fear. A good film. Much about the truck. Nothing like big Diesels, use to be my life. (merchant marine engineer)

    That's one of my favourite action films. The French original version is the best but it's a bit slow moving at the start for modern tastes. The Hollywood version gives the film a happy ending which sort of spoils it for me.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Here's a quite decent photo of one .. earning its crust in Poland, and to do with fossil fuel, so I don't have to keep an eye out for black helicopters from the glows-in-the-dark crowd:.

    http://krio-serwis.pl/sites/default/..._zam/pic02.jpg...

    Bill
    That baby is big even for a C-B!

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    "A Winton 8 cylinder would not be an oversize load. In fact a Winton of any size would not be oversize or weight."

    Read the post. He did not say the Winton was the load being delivered, it was just out on display for some reason.

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    Good day Joe.
    My name is Pierre. I am from South Africa. I bought a old tipper truck. Some say it is a Euclid and some say it is a Terex R17.
    The data plate is were unclear. I can see it was build by a company in South Africa under Blackwood Hodge company.
    My problem is I got the truck without a transmission. It was fitted with a autobox.
    The engine is a Detroit 6 inline 2 stroke engine. There is no fly wheel or fing gear on the crank, however there is a flex plate on the crank. I need to know what transmission will fit. I can find no info anywhere. I think it might be a Allison transmission but have no idea what model number. I have found Allison trannys with fly wheel and ring gear as part of the transmission. Any help on this? I can mail photos of truck if I have a mail adress.
    Thanks. Pierre Coetzee.

  13. #51
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    Paging John Evans:

    John: this sounds somewhat up your alley, since you have been a heavy truck parts specialist. I've never delved into what the mounting arrangements for an Allison transmission would be.

    Pierre:
    On the Detroit diesel engine, there should be an identification tag. That will have the data on the engine, and will include some long identification numbers. The big question is how much money do you want to put into the old tipper truck ? In the USA, used and remanufactured Allison transmissions can be found fairly easily. The problem is matching the right Allison transmission mounting to the engine in your truck. We use one heavy truck parts specialist in Albany, NY, who seems to be a magician at knowing what fits what, and finding parts for ancient Cummins engines, amongst other things. Unfortunately, he does not have email, and the costs of shipping a used Allison transmission to South Africa are going to be quite high. I do not know the time difference between South Africa and NY State, but the truck parts company is: Green Truck Supply, Inc. The man to talk to is Joseph Iacubucci (pronounced: yaka-boo-chee), and his phone is: 518-456-4335, FAX 518-456-6527

    Mr. Iacabucci may know of some truck and heavy equipment salvage yards who would have used Allison transmissions taken from running equipment, and he might know someone who is more of an expert in Allison transmissions and fitups to the different engines.

    Sorry I cannot be of more help to you.

    Best regards-
    Joe Michaels

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    Default Continental multifuel engines.

    [QUOTE=Joe Michaels;2326235]Marshall:

    There is a third way to kill a Detroit, as this story will show-

    Possibly, the only diesels they had seen up to that point were the Continental multi fuel engines in the 6 x 6 trucks, which are normal 4 stroke engines.

    I recall reading a US soldier claiming in the 60's he could run trucks with the Multi-fuel engines at 112mph on German highways.

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    My advice is before wasting any money on the GM,which is likely a 6/71,take the head off and check for cracks.....these will be quite obvious.......if the head is badly cracked,then my suggestion is to get another motor about the right size,and with a manual gearbox.........this will get your dumper going.....the early 15 ton Euclids had Fuller gearboxes,biggies for sure,but far simpler than mucking around with a 2nd hand Allison............

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Michaels View Post
    Paging John Evans:

    John: this sounds somewhat up your alley, since you have been a heavy truck parts specialist. I've never delved into what the mounting arrangements for an Allison transmission would be.

    Pierre:
    On the Detroit diesel engine, there should be an identification tag. That will have the data on the engine, and will include some long identification numbers. The big question is how much money do you want to put into the old tipper truck ? In the USA, used and remanufactured Allison transmissions can be found fairly easily. The problem is matching the right Allison transmission mounting to the engine in your truck. We use one heavy truck parts specialist in Albany, NY, who seems to be a magician at knowing what fits what, and finding parts for ancient Cummins engines, amongst other things. Unfortunately, he does not have email, and the costs of shipping a used Allison transmission to South Africa are going to be quite high. I do not know the time difference between South Africa and NY State, but the truck parts company is: Green Truck Supply, Inc. The man to talk to is Joseph Iacubucci (pronounced: yaka-boo-chee), and his phone is: 518-456-4335, FAX 518-456-6527

    Mr. Iacabucci may know of some truck and heavy equipment salvage yards who would have used Allison transmissions taken from running equipment, and he might know someone who is more of an expert in Allison transmissions and fitups to the different engines.

    Sorry I cannot be of more help to you.

    Best regards-
    Joe Michaels
    Hi Joe.
    Thanks for all the info. I will contact Joseph.
    Will let you know when the truck is running.
    Thanks.
    Pierre

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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    My advice is before wasting any money on the GM,which is likely a 6/71,take the head off and check for cracks.....these will be quite obvious.......if the head is badly cracked,then my suggestion is to get another motor about the right size,and with a manual gearbox.........this will get your dumper going.....the early 15 ton Euclids had Fuller gearboxes,biggies for sure,but far simpler than mucking around with a 2nd hand Allison............
    Thanks John.
    Will see what I can do.
    Will let you know when its running.
    Thanks.
    Pierre

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    Sorry but have NO experience with Allison auto trans. The Euclid's I sold parts for back in the late 60s used Fuller 10F1220 and similar model Fuller gearboxs. The shift knob pattern shown in the OP Looks like a Spicer 8000 series 5 speed direct,ie 5th direct.
    Were the SA truck were mine I'd be looking for a wrecked Semi tractor for a engine & trans.Just get one that has no electronics.

  19. #57
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    Here is a Euclid I saw last year at a Twizel, a hydro town in the South island of New Zealand. It would have been used in the extensive hydro power projects in the area, probably 1960's? There are 8 hydro power stations in the Waitaki hydro scheme between Lake Tekapo and Lake Waitaki.

    There is a Cat bulldozer and an International scraper on display in the same park.

    The Euclid is parked inside what I think is a piece of penstock (if that is the correct terminology)!

    BTW, the Euclid is powered by Rolls-Royce. I am guessing the Euclid was built in Scotland, correction welcome.

    twizel-euclid-01.jpg twizel-euclid-02.jpg twizel-euclid-03.jpg twizel-euclid-04.jpgtwizel-international-01.jpg

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    The Rolls Royce C6 and C8 motors were popular with desk jockies ordering plant.....not with operators,and certainly not popular with mechanics........RR had a motto,never use one bolt when you can use three......a multitude of small bolts and screws made repairs time consuming......Dont forget Cummins had a UK factory too.

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  22. #59
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    The Zagray Farm Museum in Colchester CT has a dump truck like that, has a 6-71 in it. Also they have a Euc dozer with twin 6-71s. Both have been run in recent years. I don't know how often they run them. Their web site is interesting too. There is also a machine shop there with a lot of lathes, shapers, horizontal mills, planers, etc., all antique. They don't have that on the web site but it is usually open during one of the 3 shows/swap meets they have each year.
    When I was in the navy back in the late 60 I ran boats as the "engineer" in Guantanamo Bay and a lot of them had 6-71. The admiral and captain's gigs both had them, motor launches, and 3 different size landing craft. The old torpedo retriver had two, and the new one had two V-12 71. The larger landing craft that would take a tank had two 6-71s coupled together for each shaft, twin screw. The harbor patrol boats each had two 6V-53s. After a year there I was transfered to a small tanker. This had 4 16-278As for main propulsion and two 8 268As for ships service generators. There was also a 6-71 and 1-71 for emergency power.
    After I got out and was working we had a delivery and when the trucker went to start the engine to leave it would only fire maybe once, then nothing. I reached into the engine compartment and reset the emergency shutdown he had used to shut down the engine and it started. Turns out it was a rented tractor and he didn't really know all the controls.

  23. #60
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    It's too late to edit my earlier post (#57), I have been looking through my books - I think the rear dump in my photos is probably a R-15/FD series, 15 tons capacity. They were the longest-running of all Euclid models, built from 1936 until 1963, albeit with many updates over the years (63 different models).

    Quote Originally Posted by Peter S View Post
    Here is a Euclid I saw last year at a Twizel, a hydro town in the South island of New Zealand.


    twizel-euclid-02.jpg twizel-euclid-04.jpg


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