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  1. #21
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    Along with what Asquith said about the motor, the motor just doesn't look big enough to power that turret lathe, especially being a DC motor at that. For that time period, pre-WW II, that motor should be at least three times that size for that lathe and probably only 5 HP at most 7-1/2 HP. I've dealt with motors from that era and they are not small as compared to 1950's era motors. Maybe as Asquith said, maybe they are fixing to do some retrofitting to the machine not mentioned. The cover is missing off the back side of the bed, maybe a motor mount will go there? Why would you use a back drop in this picture? They don't show any in the other pictures. This looks more like a picture from Lang's factory, not Lea Casting factory to me.

    What do yaw think?

    Ken

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  3. #22
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    Asquith & 4GSR, I like your observation on the lathe photograph, firstly it is a mystery illustration somehow or other it does not tie in with the ethos of Lang's It is too dull a setting, any publicity stuff from Lang's was superbly illustrated with really high class graphics, they seem to have been a firm who laid great stress on the lovely art work on their publicity leaflets from away back, The cored opening at the back of the bed on Lang boring & facing machines was a feature of many of this pattern of Lang's boring & facing models (Seemed to me to be a really handy place to hide your spoiled workpieces from the foreman, As an add on to my contribution although the following took place many miles from Leys works, In the early 1950 era in the town of Ayr in Scotland, the mining switchgear firm of The Wallacetown Switchgear Co who were renowned along with Belmos Switchgear in Lanarkshire Scotland, (AS makers of flameproof underground control panels for coal cutters etc), Wallacetown had their brassfoundry in John Street in Ayr, a "stones throw" from Turners Bridge is a light pedestrian footbridge of handsome proportions over the river Ayr, It was practice if upon occasions anyone made a scrapper and did not want the foreman to know of their misdeeds to throw the offending casting over Turners bridge on the way home or to the local hostelry after finishing time This nefarious practice was the name of the game until the Burgh Engineer Mr Timothy O'Brien decided to do some remedial to the piers up-on which the bridge sat Well Shock horror, A goodly quantity of the sins of the workforce was dredged up from the "Sin Bin", All would have been O.K. but Mr O'Brien notified the management of The Wallacetown Co as to his findings, Well as is frequently quoted "The Manure Hit THe Fan!" If that was the case I wonder if in Lays Malleable should that dark repository, , Very handy for hiding stuffed up workpieces and "Chinese Government Contracts ,For home consumption were hidden therein to be found by the foreman?

    Now back to the electric motor It looks very much like a design by Higgs motors of Birmingham , makers of superb well engineered machines , I think it is a three phase motor & not a direct current motor, It is a typical drip proof casing as produced by Messrs Higgs, Mather & Platt of Manchester also made a somewhat similar design, , to go back to Scotland, Skeldon mills at Hollybush , had about four big Higgs driving their line shafting in the weaving shed (About 25 horse power each), As a kid I thought they were cool things with the nice peaceful whine from each one, "We don't need no steenking steam engines" Sorry for plagiarising the old film which starred Humphry Bogart, -- The Treasure's of The Sierra Madre.

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  5. #23
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    Making chips that long is a bad idea. One time I was turning down a long aluminum bar with the chip coming down in front of the Sheldon. For some reason I didn't interrupt the cut as I usually do. I had many feet on the floor in a heap and when the cut got close to the chuck a jaw snagged it and the whole chip rolled up between the chuck and end of the headstock. I was standing to the right of the cut and the switch is on the headstock. There were enough things behind me that I couldn't get away from the stuff flailing around so I had to use an arm to protect my face and walk through the chip storm. I survived but the end of the headstock looks sandblasted with all paint removed. I need to put a stop button on the tail end. Nice picture, but staged and poor practice.

    Bill

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