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  1. #1
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    Default ...Photos...Mesta Machine Company...

    ...Forging Press and her crew...



    ...Vertical Boring Mill...



    ...what I imagine were considered Forging Lathes...somebody needs to empty the Chip Bins...


  2. #2
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    The contribution by Mesta to the steel making industry was significant.
    Compare the rollers in this blooming stand to the last photo in post #1.
    blooming-mill-1965-.jpgblooming-mill-.jpg

    Plate and Hot Strip
    entry-stand-134-inch-plate-mill-.jpgsingle-stand-continuous-hot-strip-1940-.jpg

    John Mohr and Son was located on the South side of Chicago.
    Mohr made caissons for the Civil War.
    The company had a very large fab shop and machine shop.
    Ladles would be shipped by barge from USS Gary Works and offloaded
    underneath the twin bridges of the Chicago Skyway.
    Mohr made a lot of water cooled gate valves for blast furnaces.
    I worked there when the gate valves were made for the new Inland Steel
    blast furnace. At the time it would be the second largest in the country.
    Here is a bottom tap ladle by Mohr.
    mohr-ladle-castor-tundish.jpg
    John

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lathefan View Post
    ...Forging Press and her crew...



    ...Vertical Boring Mill...



    ...what I imagine were considered Forging Lathes...somebody needs to empty the Chip Bins...

    Man, these photos remind me so much of the machine shop I worked in at the Pearl Harbor shipyard when I was in the Navy. We had vertical boring mills of that size in the shop, though they seldom ran. The biggest I ever personally ran was a 48" vertical turret lathe. This brings back a lot of memories.

    Looking more closely at the photo of the vertical boring mill photo, it doesn't look like the work-piece is clamped to the face-plate!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by I_AM_MACHINE View Post
    Looking more closely at the photo of the vertical boring mill photo, it doesn't look like the work-piece is clamped to the face-plate!
    The bottom face is a reference surface. The part is centered and held by movable jaws. It may also be clamped to the table thru the bore in the bottom using the T-slots and parallels.
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by I_AM_MACHINE View Post

    Looking more closely at the photo of the vertical boring mill photo, it doesn't look like the work-piece is clamped to the face-plate!
    I reckon it's dogged down inside, above the operators right shoulder is what looks like a cut out large enough to get a man in.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhruska View Post
    The bottom face is a reference surface. The part is centered and held by movable jaws. It may also be clamped to the table thru the bore in the bottom using the T-slots and parallels.
    John
    John,

    Thanks for the clarification. I didn't think about the jaws or clamps being on the inside of the body.

    The valve bodies I routinely turned on the vertical turret lathe had flanges, so the normal routine was to clamp the flange of the valve body to a large plate held in the chuck, under which I had placed jacking screws so that I could slightly tilt the plate to get the face of the valve seat running true. It was not uncommon to spend an hour setting one up for a five minute cut to true up the valve seat.

    Kevin

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  10. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by I_AM_MACHINE View Post
    John,
    It was not uncommon to spend an hour setting one up for a five minute cut to true up the valve seat.

    Kevin
    Hey Kevin, this is when the set-up tooling makes you look smart when the job gets knocked out under quote.
    In the photo there are four five inch diameter risers for the job to sit on. There were sets of these all shop made. All were kissed on the Mattison grinder for parallel sets. Drilled thru and tapped on the bottom and face for 3/4-10. Cross drilled for a 1" bar to tighten them down. 3/4" bolt with a jam nut and then skim cut parallel to the table. There were six table bars (G&L) that also used the risers. I did a lot of forged rings on the VTL and having the right set-up made them a gravy job.
    Here is a photo with my set-up for California Steel bearing chocks for the new single high rolling mill about 1996. The rough cuts were about 1/4" on a side. Roughed out on the Bullard. Rough cuts on the G&L's. Finish on the Bullard then back to the Bars. Always had to set the taper on the left boring head. Once set the bores finished within a couple tenths or dead on top to bottom. 33 of them
    contiental-machine-engineering.jpgcalifornia-steel-bearing-chock.jpgbearing-chock.jpgsmall-machine-bay.jpg
    John

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    My home town Leechburg, PA was the origin of Mesta. From Beers Historical Record Chapter 14 - Leechburg Borough

    The Leechburg Foundry & Machine Co. was built in 1887, destroyed by fire in 1888 and rebuilt in the following year. The capital of the company was $100,000 and the officers were: W. A. Cochran, president; George Moesta, vice president; W. D. Rowan, secretary; R. R. Moore, treasurer. In 1900 the plant was moved to Homestead, Pa., to be nearer the source of their orders.

    Mesta Machine Co. - History | VintageMachinery.org

    Mesta Machinery - Wikipedia

    Mesta Machine Company Photographs | Historic Pittsburgh

    Paul

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  13. #9
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    Used to make repair parts for the Mesta downcoiler. The finished sheet metal is wrapped around an expanding mandrel. That is how the coils of steel are wound. Looked for a photo but have not found one. Instead here are a few others.
    plate-mill-roughing-stand.jpgplate-mill-.jpgcold-shear-end-cutting-plate-1920.jpgfinished-plate-inland-steel-1920.jpghot-strip-1950.jpg
    John

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhruska View Post
    Hey Kevin, this is when the set-up tooling makes you look smart when the job gets knocked out under quote.
    In the photo there are four five inch diameter risers for the job to sit on. There were sets of these all shop made. All were kissed on the Mattison grinder for parallel sets. Drilled thru and tapped on the bottom and face for 3/4-10. Cross drilled for a 1" bar to tighten them down. 3/4" bolt with a jam nut and then skim cut parallel to the table. There were six table bars (G&L) that also used the risers. I did a lot of forged rings on the VTL and having the right set-up made them a gravy job.
    Here is a photo with my set-up for California Steel bearing chocks for the new single high rolling mill about 1996. The rough cuts were about 1/4" on a side. Roughed out on the Bullard. Rough cuts on the G&L's. Finish on the Bullard then back to the Bars. Always had to set the taper on the left boring head. Once set the bores finished within a couple tenths or dead on top to bottom. 33 of them
    contiental-machine-engineering.jpgcalifornia-steel-bearing-chock.jpgbearing-chock.jpgsmall-machine-bay.jpg
    John
    John,

    That is awesome!

    Kevin

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