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  1. #21
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    I wonder how anyone can make a profit running a 6-71.....

    Good story though Joe.

  2. #22
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    I had seen a video on another aviation forum about Classic Wings who’s owner also owns Cord King ,a company building firewood processors shown in the early part of the video from 2011
    YouTube
    The Most Productive Firewood Processor In The World | Cord King

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I wonder how anyone can make a profit running a 6-71.....

    Good story though Joe.
    This guy makes his living going around the country repairing old buses with the 6-71 engines
    . About the only engine he works on...


  4. Likes Jim Christie, JoeE. liked this post
  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    This guy makes his living going around the country repairing old buses with the 6-71 engines
    . About the only engine he works on...

    Yes, I own a couple of them.

    However, when running one all day long, you'll find they are not as efficient as the other diesels, and they like to drink allot of lube oil as well.

    So at the end of 1 year's running, you could float the engine and machinery on the extra fuel & oil it consumed.

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Yes, I own a couple of them.

    However, when running one all day long, you'll find they are not as efficient as the other diesels, and they like to drink allot of lube oil as well.

    So at the end of 1 year's running, you could float the engine and machinery on the extra fuel & oil it consumed.
    The guy was saying his gets about 10 mpg on the road and 3 mpg in town.

    My 43 foot Newmar Ventana has a 400hp cummings, weighs 14000 lb more than his bus and also gets 10 to 11 mpg on the road.

    While l like working on and with old machine tools sometimes newer tools make life easier... No way in Hell would I trade busses with that guy

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by swatkins View Post
    The guy was saying his gets about 10 mpg on the road and 3 mpg in town.

    My 43 foot Newmar Ventana has a 400hp cummings, weighs 14000 lb more than his bus and also gets 10 to 11 mpg on the road.

    While l like working on and with old machine tools sometimes newer tools make life easier... No way in Hell would I trade busses with that guy

    Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
    I asked an older trucker how much oil the Detroit's drink.

    On a cross country trip....a 5 gallon bucket.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I asked an older trucker how much oil the Detroit's drink.

    On a cross country trip....a 5 gallon bucket.

    My planer took 75 gallons to fill up...... ( Trying desperately to keep this topic on subject )

  9. #28
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    Thats pretty amazing. Its removing some metal too!!!

    I love Detroits. Nothing like them.

    Back on topic: I would love to have a smallish planer as a curiosity. I know they are a dead end for most stuff, but its kind of like a shaper, you can make anything but money with one!

  10. #29
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    I agree: in the USA, planers and shapers are pretty much forgotten or obsolete machine tools in working machine shops. There are a few types of work that shapers and planers really are good at. On locomotive restoration or repair work, machining the wedges and shoes used in the "pedestals" (part of the main frames) where the "driving boxes" (bearing boxes on the driving wheel axles) are located, a shaper with a universal table is the machine to have. For many years, machine tool builders, and some rebuilders, preferred to use planers for machining ways and dovetail sliding surfaces. The belief was having the tool marks all parallel to the line of travel of the working parts would give a more dimensionally stable part. The other belief, in the days of scraped and frosted sliding surfaces, was that the surface finish done with a broad nosed tool was a whole lot easier to clean up and bring into required flatness than a milled surface. With the move to way grinders, this became something of a non-issue or a dusty old bit of information that only dinosaurs such as myself have in our memory banks.

    I personally like having a shaper around to cut internal keyways on jobs for which no broach exists (or for those "once only" jobs where it does not pay to buy a broach). The other place a shaper with a universal table really shines is for cutting internal keyways when a tapered key is used. The ideal machine for those jobs would be a large slotter, but they are probably more scarce than shapers.

    A lot of older planers survive handily as planer mills. The late Robert Yancey, of Yancey Machine Tool Company, told me that he made a number of conversions of old planers into planer mills, going so far as to make them CNC machine tools. At the time, his shop was building a CNC planer mill from a double housing G.A. Gray planer. It was to be a machine for milling and drilling bolted connections on some specialized structural members on a new bridge. I made Mr. Yancey's acquaintance because we needed a planer mill for a job we were going to be doing at the NY Power Authority. We found a planer mill sitting dead in a shop in Philadelphia. The shop had moved to the outskirts of Philly, and the planer mill was in their old building. They powered it up for us to test run, and we bought it. That planer mill began in 1937 as an openside Cincinnati Hypro planer. It was sold new to the US Naval Shipyard at Norfolk, VA. In about 1947, after WWII, the planer was sold as surplus and went to a shop known as "Bissinger & Stein" in Philly. B & S ran the planer as a planer for maybe 30 years and converted it to a planer mill by mounting two Yancey 30 HP milling spindles on it. The original planer drive was a large DC motor with a control cabinet and motor-generator set. B & S simply attached a small DC motor with a high ratio reduction gear to the driveshaft where the original large DC motor had coupled onto. This let them have fine feeds. Apparently, they were machining large weldments, and other than being able to control depth of cut and position of the milling head on the planer rail, they did not need any control on X axis position.

    We bought that planer mill, I made Mr. Yancey's acquaintance and got quite an education from him. We shipped the planer mill to a rebuild shop in Maine. They retrofitted a modern drive system to the table along with DRO, so we could position the X axis location precisely. We did one job with that planer mill, then sold it.

    The Cincinnati Hypro was a finely built machine tool, and as a planer mill, we were barely working it. As Mr. Yancey pointed out, the older planers had a lot more good iron castings to them, so were much more dimensionally stable and rigid than a lot of newer machine tools. He bemoaned the fact that good planers were in short supply as so many had been scrapped. The other use for old planers was for conversion to way grinders.

    A buddy of mine has a smallish planer in his automotive repair/restoration shop. It is a machine built ca 1919 in Danbury, Connecticut. The original owners were a large vegetable farming and canning operation somewhere near Germantown, NY. They never used the planer much (they had a machine shop for repairing farm and cannery machinery). My buddy used the planer mainly to do automobile, tractor, and industrial engine cylinder heads and to "deck" engine blocks. What he found is the planer is the ideal machine for resurfacing aluminum cylinder heads. He was sending heads from Mercedes-Benz, BMW, and other cars to a local automotive machine shop. They would use the usual head resurfacing machine (possibly some form of large face mill or segemented grinding wheel ?). Whatever the local automotive machinists were using, it got the heads flat to specs, but my buddy decided to try doing one on his planer. To his initial surprise, the old planer got the aluminum heads FLATTER than the automotive machine shop with their "modern" head milling or resurfacing machine. Using a round-nosed tool, the old planer produces a finer surface finish, and the flatness over the run of a cylinder head is within a few tenths. We attribute this to the fact that a planer is a SLOW machine tool, and as such, with a light cut, will not heat up a cylinder head appreciably. On aluminum heads such as from European cars, doing them with a face milling cutter has the aluminum getting too warm and expanding while the milling is still being done. The old planer is a slower, and therefore, cooler process. Possibly, there is some truth to the old belief of having all the tool marks in the same/parallel direction. I've seen my buddy planing heads for Mercedes, Alfa-Romeo (castings like punky cheese, repairs to combustion chambers with welding, then restore the combustion chamber geometery before planing the head),E type Jags, and many iron heads on everything from Model A's, Ford 8N tractors, to small block V-8's. The old planer earns its keep in his shop. A Hendey shaper sits next to the planer, and it earns its keep as well. It's a niche type of work, and a planer and shaper find good use in his shop. In a "regular" machine shop, it's mostly a world of CNC machining centers and indexable carbide cutting tools. I am realistic enough to know that a machine shop in business as such could not be competitive with a planer or shaper as a machine tool to "get the work out" with.


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