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  1. #1
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    Default Please help ID grinder

    I picked this up on a recent trip. I've searched the R.Hoe & Company New York and found some information but nothing about a grinder. The grinder mounts to a substantial L bracket with graduated markings on each end. The grinder motor also slides on the first mount. Does anyone have any information on it? What is it used for?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_4215.jpg   img_4214.jpg  

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    They made printing equipment and circular saws. I worked at a newspaper for five years, but don't recall seeing your machine parts there. Maybe a saw thing.

    R. Hoe & Co. - History | VintageMachinery.org
    R. Hoe & Company - Wikipedia

    Larry

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    The grinder motor unit looks much the same as the Foley model 357 carbide saw grinder.
    FOLEY 357 Carbide Saw Grinder Operator's & Parts Manual | Ozark Tool Manuals & Books
    Foley model 357 carbide saw grinder
    Try a Google Image Search for Foley model 357 Saw grinder for more pictures with other views.
    Maybe yours was made by Foley and rebadged or the other way around although Foley sold these for a long time under their various names .
    it would appear they are no longer making saw grinding machinery .
    Grinder Equipment, Golf & Turf Grinders | Foley United

    The piece behind your grinder motor looks like a part of an attachment for sharpening gear and other form relieved cutters on a tool and cutter grinder.
    See various types of these in this thread
    Help Identify Brown And Sharpe Attachment

    Regards,
    Jim

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    Thanks for the info guys, really amazing how much knowledge is in this group. Interesting that the color in the Foley picture is the same as the piece I have.

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    I've got one of their printing presses in the room next to my shop. It's quite an important relic - used to print the Woonsocket Patriot, the 2nd largest circulation abolitionist newspaper in the days before the Civil War. Abraham Lincoln visited Woonsocket at the behest of the owners of the paper to make a speech just before the election of 1860. The local newspaper, the Woonsocket Call, is a direct decendent of that paper and the press was in their basement until a few years ago when it was given to a local organization intending to start a museum. My colleague, the owner of the building my shop is in, volunteered me to get it working. It's a hand press - one with a big screw and lever. Though I spent most of my life in the printing business, even I have never used a hand press. Nevertheless, its just a mechanical device and a fairly simple one at that. I still have a huge pile of furniture and do know how to make up a chase. My plan was to set it up to print a broadside of the type circulated at the time...

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    Maybe Hoe sold those machines to support the saws they were selling.
    It could also be that the bought the grinder head from Foley and adapted it for use on a special machine they made or attachment to sharpen something on one of their printing related machines.
    Something with a circular knife on it .
    I am familiar with a machinelike this one used for cloth that has a grinding attachment behind for the circular knife.
    Utica combination rewinding - YouTube
    Perhaps something similar is used in some part of the printing industry .
    A little different set up on this machine
    UTICA SSC GRINDER SERUP - YouTube
    The machine I worked on had the grinding wheel direct on the motor like the one in the first video.
    Regards,
    Jim

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  11. #7
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    I wonder if Hoe sold lead saws... in loose type printing you used strips of lead to separate the lines of type - which is why the space between lines of type is still called "leading." When making up a chase, sometimes you would have to trim a piece of lead. There were several tools for this but if it was a thick piece you used a saw. It looks like a small, extremely precise table saw that used a blade similar to a slitting saw for metal. I have one in the basement, stuck from years of being out doors, that I intend to fix one of these days.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 99Panhard View Post
    I wonder if Hoe sold lead saws... in loose type printing you used strips of lead to separate the lines of type - which is why the space between lines of type is still called "leading." When making up a chase, sometimes you would have to trim a piece of lead. There were several tools for this but if it was a thick piece you used a saw. It looks like a small, extremely precise table saw that used a blade similar to a slitting saw for metal. I have one in the basement, stuck from years of being out doors, that I intend to fix one of these days.
    The Vintage Machinery link I posted earlier has two photos of Hoe printers' saws. R. Hoe & Co. - Photo Index | VintageMachinery.org

    Larry

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    From memory, and I'll include the union members in the newspaper hats were very hostile to answering questions, they used a strange looking saw to whittle the plates that printed pictures to fit into the page being set up on the press.
    I'm not too well versed on the trimming procedure since my view was deliberately blocked when the pressmen realized I was watching.

    Given the joy I've had cutting lead over the years, a strange saw makes sense.

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    Fascinating stuff indeed! I'm thinking it is likely that it is part of a Foley sharpener that Hoe stuck their name on or possibly a joint effort.

    Many thanks for the replies!

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