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Thread: Porter-Cable

  1. #21
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    Brown-Lipe Gear made the transmissions for the Mercer Raceabout.

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  3. #22
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    Brown & Lipe also made auxiliary transmissions (nickname "Brownies")for heavy trucks before the advent of modern multi-gear trannys such as Roadrangers. The Brownie would be set up behind the truck's main trans and shifting would be done using twin sticks. quite a lost art.

    Tom B.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riderusty View Post
    Brown & Lipe also made auxiliary transmissions (nickname "Brownies")for heavy trucks before the advent of modern multi-gear trannys such as Roadrangers. The Brownie would be set up behind the truck's main trans and shifting would be done using twin sticks. quite a lost art.

    Tom B.
    Back in the early 80's, I did some time at a trucking outfit. They used to piece together trucks for themselves and occasionally others. They had been a Diamond T dealer at one point, so there was still a Diamond T in the fleet and a Diamond Reo.
    A 5 and 4 arraignment was standard issue then. We put together a truck for a customer, one time, starting with a compactor truck chassis. It only had a 5 speed, we reconfigured the driveshafts and added a 4 speed auxiliary. Due to the fact it had been a compactor truck, with so much weight on the back, the owner said that it didn't ride well til he got at least 10 tons on it.

  6. #24
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    I also have a big-ish Brown Lipe gearbox fitted to a Federal 604.....It seems the transmission business was sold out to Spicer early in WW2.....W.C Lipe was an interesting guy,from what i ve read....seems he set up a machine shop pre 1890s ,and provided space and facilities for inventors to make their ideas.He also seems to have produced just about everthing needed for the auto industry as it started off from 1895 onwards.in the many companies he had an interest in .You can still buy Lipe Rollway clutches.......and the needle bearing universal was his invention.

  7. #25
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    I am sitting down the street from Lipes original building which is now a hardware store. THe Lipe gear building is still next store and was renovated for artist studios. the building is a concrete frame Kahn design. A block a way I work in the Kahn building built in the 30s for brown lipe which became fisher guide, GM. eventually Porter Cable moved in, then out in the 70s. Now it is the home to many small businesses. A friend down the hall here, Helen's grandfather invented the router which became the Porter Cable router. she tells the story that when he sold his company to Porter Cable in the 30s, he did not trust checks or banks so the payment was delivered in cash by a Brinks truck. He then hid it, possibly burying it on his property. The family is still looking for it.
    In that same block New Process Gear, Carrier Air Conditioner, LC Smith shot guns, Franklin Auto, Smith Corona Typewriters, were all related and located closely together.
    Another aquantance down the hall, recently bought Alex Brown's mansion and is fixing it up.

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  9. #26
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    Porter-Cable radial arm saw

    Lipe-Walrath broom sewing machine

    Mike

    porter-cable-radial-arm-saw.jpg



    broom-machine-front.jpg

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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails porter-cable-radial-arm-saw.jpg   lipe-walrath-broom-sewing-machine.jpg  
    Last edited by rustyironism; 01-12-2019 at 10:36 AM. Reason: won't let me delete upside down pictures and reload correctly

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  11. #27
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    Do you run the broom making machine at shows and the like........A proper straw broom is a thing of the past here......nothing but tenth rate plastic rubbish.........Straw b
    rooms are the stuff of memories......I remember granny chasing us out of her house with a straw broom............and the poor old dog getting chased out.........brooms wernt worn out until the first row of threads unravelled....and my father used to warn us.....if you dont study hard,you will endup working in the broom factory.....which was at the end of the street......All the workers used to sing at the tops of their voices,and the smell of fresh cut millet straw filled the street.

  12. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by john.k View Post
    Do you run the broom making machine at shows and the like........A proper straw broom is a thing of the past here......nothing but tenth rate plastic rubbish.........Straw brooms are the stuff of memories......I remember granny chasing us out of her house with a straw broom............and the poor old dog getting chased out.........brooms wernt worn out until the first row of threads unravelled....and my father used to warn us.....if you dont study hard,you will endup working in the broom factory.....which was at the end of the street......All the workers used to sing at the tops of their voices,and the smell of fresh cut millet straw filled the street.
    John,

    Thanks for the stories!
    The corn (sorghum) broom has a fascinating history here, from Africa, to Ben Franklin starting the Corn Broom industry, selling world wide, to mid-America, where Libman, and at least one other, still makes great corn brooms in Arcola, Illinois, where they still hold a Broom Corn Festival every year, to Colorado, Texas, Oklahoma, where Government regulation played a part in sending it all to Mexico, where it still flourishes.


    I don't have the sewer running yet, but, when I do, I plan to make occasional brooms with the foot powered winder, and stitcher vise, and other stuff, but will not be displaying it anywhere.

    There are many small makers , commercial and artisinal, feeding their families by making corn brooms.
    I have no doubt you could find one in Australia somewhere.


    My story of discovering broom making still boggles my mind, but, not to get too far off topic in this thread, here is a video of the place where I first saw broom making, with powered equipment.

    Broom Making - YouTube


    and here, by hand and foot power..

    Bob Haffly the broom guy - YouTube


    Mike

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