Possible Bement & Dougherty lathe - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by cekann23 View Post
    So does anyone have an idea: I get that these guys had apprentices and family and who know what else.
    Did they build these machines from the ground up?
    Did they employ, contract, and/or share pattern makers?
    Some of these lathes I'm seeing in doing my research have identical beds - did they buy the beds from a third party?
    Did they make all their own gears or did they source them from a gear maker?
    Thanks,
    CK
    Hi Chris,

    You finally made it over here.
    Did you find or get the other part of the broken back gear?
    Did you remove the lead screw and get a picture of the name cast in the bed?

    A lot of questions. It all depends on what time frame you are looking at.

    Most built machine tools from the ground up.

    Most employed. A few did contract. Some did share foundries and pattern makers.
    Larger makers usually had their own foundry and pattern shop.
    South Bend Lathe used Sibley for their castings.

    I don't know of anyone who bought lathe beds from third parties.
    Usually when a maker came up with a bed design (or any other design unless patented) and it worked and was successful/popular, others would copy it.
    I think most made their own gears, but smaller makers could have outsourced them from a gear maker or other machine shop.
    Some makers outsourced whole machines. Lodge did this early on with some of the machines they offered, when he first started with Barker.

    Rob

  2. #22
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    Jim,
    Thanks for the links -I'll check them out
    CK

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Lang View Post
    Hi Chris,

    You finally made it over here.
    Did you find or get the other part of the broken back gear?
    Did you remove the lead screw and get a picture of the name cast in the bed?


    A lot of questions. It all depends on what time frame you are looking at.

    Most built machine tools from the ground up.

    Most employed. A few did contract. Some did share foundries and pattern makers.
    Larger makers usually had their own foundry and pattern shop.
    South Bend Lathe used Sibley for their castings.

    I don't know of anyone who bought lathe beds from third parties.
    Usually when a maker came up with a bed design (or any other design unless patented) and it worked and was successful/popular, others would copy it.
    I think most made their own gears, but smaller makers could have outsourced them from a gear maker or other machine shop.
    Some makers outsourced whole machines. Lodge did this early on with some of the machines they offered, when he first started with Barker.

    Rob
    Rob,

    YES! I was able to recover the missing part of the back-gear. Or at least I will tomorrow. In between the time I read your post until now I received a call out of the blue from the guys I bought the Lathe from. It turns out they did have the missing part after all. After I had acquired the other gears I had sent a text to the one guy and he said the first buyer had taken it along. The guy I bought the gears from didn't have it. I pick it up tomorrow.

    What I'm not sure of yet is how it goes together on the head stock. Others I've seen have an eccentric shaft through them. I haven't seen anything like that in the pictures even before the first guy bought and stripped parts off.

    Here is the pictures of the bed behind the leadscrew showing the cast lettering

    20171113_153232.jpg

    20171113_153253.jpg

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by cekann23 View Post
    What I'm not sure of yet is how it goes together on the head stock. Others I've seen have an eccentric shaft through them. I haven't seen anything like that in the pictures even before the first guy bought and stripped parts off.
    Chris,

    I don't think the back gear shaft was there. Most likely it got bent when the gear got broke.
    There would have been a long straight shaft(slip fit in the broken gears bore)with both ends that were turned down in diameter, for a short length, on an eccentric(offset from center line). One turned down end was longer for the handle/lever to attach to.
    There would also have been two bushings/sleeves turned in diameter to a slip fit in the bores of the two cast in brackets on the back of the head stock.
    These bushings/sleeves would have an offset hole in them to match the turned down ends on the long shaft.

    I am fairly sure this is a Bement & Dougherty.

    Rob

  5. #25
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    Here is another photograph, from circa 1920, possibly showing the Bement buildings in the upper right quadrant of the photo:

    philadelphia.parkway-construction.c1920.bement.jpg

    The Newton works are possibly the smokestacks on the river to the left.

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  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by northernsinger View Post
    Here is another photograph, from circa 1920, possibly showing the Bement buildings in the upper right quadrant of the photo:
    Yes it is.
    Some views inside from the 1920's.
    Also outside from 1884 and 1891.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bement-factory-1884.jpg   bement-factory-1920-2.jpg   bement-factory-1920-1.jpg   bement-factory-1920-3.jpg   bement-1891-2.jpg  


  8. #27
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    Another of these showed up.
    Wood lathe - tools - by owner - sale
    00c0c_7jwsaiq7g0n_600x450.jpg
    01515_8usblkm6lm7_600x450.jpg
    00v0v_4ghm0mlnzbp_600x450.jpg
    00h0h_9wlmptd7esz_600x450.jpg

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  10. #28
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    Interesting. Too bad missing the cone pulley/back-gear, saddle/carriage (it's actually a metal lathe which has been modified for wood-cutting. See 4 "ways", the rack on the front edge, the offset capable tailstock.)

    Seems like a lot of money for yard-art. One can buy a good equivalent service plug & play "Oliver" for the same money.

    Joe in NH
    Last edited by Joe in NH; 02-28-2020 at 11:18 AM.

  11. #29
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    Too bad.
    It is completely gutted as joe has said.
    Even the spindle and bearings have been replaced.
    This one might be a little earlier than the other one as this one does not appear to say "Industrial Works" on the bed.
    This one has the cast in bearings/bracket, on the lower front and rear ends of the bed, for what I think is the stopping and reverse for the feed.
    This dates to around the mid to late 1850's or very very early 1860's.

    If it were cheaper Chris(cekann23) could get it for the missing legs on his.
    Here are the legs from a larger Bement lathe from 1852.
    Also a little larger pictures.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bement-1850s-3-2-.jpg   bement-lathe-11.jpg   bement-lathe-12.jpg   bement-lathe-13.jpg   bement-lathe-14.jpg  


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  13. #30
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    I recalled seeing another one of these style of lathes on this forum when digging deep in old threads. It would take forever to find the thread but I had saved the pictures. I recall the thread being over 10+ years old.
    tai_hdlstock.jpg
    tail_apron.jpg
    tail_r_end.jpg
    tailstock_2.jpg

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  15. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by cncFireman View Post
    I recalled seeing another one of these style of lathes on this forum when digging deep in old threads. It would take forever to find the thread but I had saved the pictures. I recall the thread being over 10+ years old.
    I wonder if it was saved.
    That is the Bement apron.

    Rob
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bement-dougherty-4-2-.jpg   bement-1850s-2-2-.jpg  

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  17. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Lang View Post
    I wonder if it was saved.
    That is the Bement apron.

    Rob
    The thread was a member here who saved it if I recall correctly and the name was not one I recognized as they likely haven't posted here in years? The thread was somewhere near the beginning of this forum. Unfortunately there are a ton of threads and it likely is labeled "unknown lathe" like the other thousands of unknowns posted over the years.


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