Questions about a small pneumatic hammer
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  1. #1
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    Default Questions about a small pneumatic hammer

    Good morning,
    I also asked this question in the Fabrication section, but thought since it is very old, I would ask here as well.
    I recently picked up a small air hammer to use in my forging projects. I had seen a video here about a guy in Europe using one of these for decorative forging and surface texturing.
    The hammer is an Ingersoll Rand K1. It looks like it should unscrew to install the bits (which I don't have any). I tried to unscrew it, but it won't budge. I don't want to damage it, so does anyone know if there is a trick to opening this up? Anyone here ever use one of these? Thanks, Tom from Mass.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chipping-hammer-2.jpg   chipping-hammer.jpg  

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    I'm sure you put one wrench or a vise on the two flats where the handle meets the barrel to hold it. You might then try putting your wrench on and giving the wrench a good sharp smack with a hammer. That sharp blow is more effective than hard steady pressure. Or use an impact wrench. Quickly warm the nut where it threads on before trying. Not to much,that probably has leather seals in there. Seals could be rubber.
    Most here will see your thread in any (one) category posted. Looking at daily post covers the whole forums categories.

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    Most of the small hammers dont retain the chisel,and if they do ,they have a spiral spring wound into a groove around the nose. You certainly dont need to unscrew that part.......I have dozens of hammers of all sizes,and a small hammer like that is useful for installing and removing truck air brake linings with alloy rivets.........some of the small hammers have a sort of serrated retainer between the parts ,to stop vibration unscrewing ........you dont remove the front to swap chisels.

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    What you have is a chipping hammer. They were typically used to caulk edges of steel plates in shipbuilding and boiler making. I've used them to form a bead on boiler tubes after they've been installed. Normal chisels for these include chisels for gouging steel plate, for beading boiler tubes, and for forming smaller rivets. The hammers came in various stroke lengths, depending on the use.

    About the only maintenance these ever need is some oil from time to time - they're virtually eternal. I have one in my tool box that is probably from the 1930's, and it still works fine.

    The chisel is loosely held in place by your hand when you use it. There are no chisel retainers. After using one for a day, plan on lots and lots of hand pain, even when you wear heavy leather gloves.

    Chisels for these are available from McMaster (www.mcmaster.com)- search for "chipping hammer chisels"

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    Thanks for all the information. I will get a few chisels from McMaster Carr and give it a try. Tom

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    Some of the smaller sizes dont have a trigger .....you just push in on the chisel...........there is also a massive difference between a worn hammer and a new one ,even tho both make the same noise............back in the day when you didnt need safety glasses,you just squinted to keep the chips out of your eyes,the slackers would pick a worn out hammer ,and pretend to be working.


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