Quick-reading micrometer
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  1. #1
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    Default Quick-reading micrometer

    jd-2020-shardlow1.jpg jd-2020-shardlow2.jpg

    Recent discussion on oddball micrometers sent me to my 1930s(?) Shardlow micrometer catalogue (Ambrose Shardlow & Co, Sheffield).

    This one opens fully with one turn of the thimble, and automatically closes when released. Full explanation in the text.

    I don't know how it worked out in practice. Shardlow had some interesting ideas, including the 'Mizzy' direct reading micrometer, the 'check reading' micrometer, and the combined inch/metric mic, all of which I think I've posted about in the past. The ideas looked good on paper.

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    Very interesting design. It does look, though, as if it would be hard to make a 1-handed measurement, or at least harder than the cramped-hand method used with a conventional design mic.

    I was also interested in the superscript position of the decimal point in the price list, the decimal point being in the customary basal postion in the preceding text. Was this a common typological practice?

    -Marty-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Feldman View Post
    I was also interested in the superscript position of the decimal point in the price list, the decimal point being in the customary basal postion in the preceding text. Was this a common typological practice?
    Decimal point ? Four pounds, twelve shillings, sixpence ? Where's the decimal ? We don' need no steenkin decimals !

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    Marty,

    I think two-handed operation would have been the norm in its rolling mill application.


    The money - as EG said, was the pounds, shillings and pence system, or £sd, or LSD.


    Barking mad, but the system persisted in the UK and Ireland until 1971.


    The symbols, £, s, d indicate its Roman origins.


    The system was widely used' including in the US (until 1792). Imagine the arguments put forward for retaining it!

    The d (denari) was a penny, and there were 240 in a pound. There were also half penny coins (ha’penny), and , until 1960, ¼d (farthings). Working out the cost of, say, seven items @ £1 3s 6½ d plus three at 12s 6d (also written 12/6) was probably good for developing mental arithmetic skills.

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    You forgot the Guinea

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asquith View Post
    Working out the cost of, say, seven items @ £1 3s 6½ d plus three at 12s 6d (also written 12/6) was probably good for developing mental arithmetic skills.
    I'm convinced that making things easier makes people stupider. I don't know about England, but in China the girls at the counter now can't even deduct ¥15.6 from ¥20.6 to get five. They used to be able to run an abacus, at least.

    (Not too long ago all the bank tellers would double-check their math with an abacus. Alas, that's gone now)

    And change .... when was the last time you had someone give back change correctly ? Sad

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asquith View Post
    . . .


    The money - as EG said, was the pounds, shillings and pence system, or £sd, or LSD. . . ..
    Dang, suddenly the fuss all the way up to Brexit is clear. Those sneaky Brits -- including the makers of all those clever Shardlow mics -- have been on LSD all this time . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    I'm convinced that making things easier makes people stupider. I don't know about England, but in China the girls at the counter now can't even deduct ¥15.6 from ¥20.6 to get five. They used to be able to run an abacus, at least.

    (Not too long ago all the bank tellers would double-check their math with an abacus. Alas, that's gone now)

    And change .... when was the last time you had someone give back change correctly ? Sad
    Re abacus

    As late as 1978, at a non ferrous scrap yard my firm used, the cashier was Harry - an elderly Orthodox Jew (complete with Kippah) who on being presented with my scale tickets, would double check the machine printing, then check the price on a ticker tape, and so on, right through every possible piece of modern ''computation equipment''

    Then always saying the same line ''you can't be too careful with money boy'' as a final check run it through his abacus, and always - as in without fail, have a look of surprise as he'd exclaim ;- all the machines were right after.

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    My comment in post #2, above, was not referring to the LSD but to the two sizes of mic furnished, .10 inch and .25 inch.

    -Marty-

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Feldman View Post
    My comment in post #2, above, was not referring to the LSD but to the two sizes of mic furnished, .10 inch and .25 inch.

    -Marty-
    Typical! ....we get a thread nicely off track, only for someone to clarify a previous point they made.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Typical! ....we get a thread nicely off track, only for someone to clarify a previous point they made.
    now THAT'S funny!

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    I find that staying on track does tend to quickly kill a promising thread

    To address Marty's query, I have never seen such a jaunty placement of the decimal point. The Shardlow catalogue is done in art deco style, which probably explains such avant-garde behaviour.

    I was taught to put the decimal point at mid height. Then foreign ways set in and moved it down.

    In fact, in the apprentice training school drawing office I was taught that when specifying dimensions on drawings, the inch " symbol must be placed directly above the decimal point. This avoids those awkward situations when someone makes a component assuming that the faded decimal point is further to the right than intended.

    Avant-garde? That reminds me - I must get a fireguard before my grandson's next visit.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by Asquith View Post
    I find that staying on track does tend to quickly kill a promising thread

    Avant-garde? That reminds me - I must get a fireguard before my grandson's next visit.....
    Another reminder - we're no longer allowed to put the grandkids up the chimneys to sweep em either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Another reminder - we're no longer allowed to put the grandkids up the chimneys to sweep em either.
    ...upside down...Your still allowed (with a rope tied to 'em) use them "upright"...at least here in the colonies.

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