Rebuilding a Logan 210...
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  1. #1
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    Default Rebuilding a Logan 210...

    Hi Everyone,

    Been lurking in the shadows for a bit and reading a lot of posts, figured it was time to get involved. About 30 years ago my Dad bought a (from the best of my research) Logan 210 for the house. It only got light use, and ended up sitting for most of that time. I have been borrowing other peoples equipment to make things for tinkering and finally got the motivation to get over to my mother's house and break down that lathe. So far, from what I can tell, it is nearly complete including the change gears and in fair condition. Things like rubber bushings and bumpers and some small hardware have disappeared along the way, but 98% is there and usable. A few of the hinge brackets are cracked and the counter staff pulley has a few cracked spokes. The previous owner had pimped it out with a pale lime green color applied via sloppy paint brush. It might even be house paint.

    My first order of business has been getting rid of rust, cleaning and painting. I followed a guide on here about electrolysis rust removal (thank you) and have blown away at how fast I have been able to move. I have been bathing parts in a 24-48 hour soak at 0.5 - 3 amps and it completely blows the old paint off. With a bit of scrubbing and a clean up wash, the parts are ready for primer and paint or cold bluing. So far I have completely redone the tail stock and some collets and collet holders. The bed feet just came out of the bath and now I'm on to the drive cover.

    I'll post pictures when I have a moment of the progress.

    I do have one quick question:

    My headstock as a small opening and it looks factory. It's just to the right of the Logan name plate. I don't see anything in the parts break downs or pictures I have been looking at. Anyone know what its for or the story?

    Thanks.

    -Rob
    Last edited by RobDrech; 09-04-2019 at 02:46 PM.

  2. #2
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    Without a picture I can only guess: maybe for the electric switch? Google "logan 210" and look at the Images.

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    A smallish rectangular opening with 4 screw holes?

    If so, it is for the power switch. I'm betting the 210 either is a FrankenLogan, made of random Logan parts, or else one built early, possibly in 1942, when they were apparently using anything they had to put together lathes for the military right after Pearl Harbor.

    That style headstock was used on lathes Logan made for Wards, who was their original customer. Apparently Wards wanted a lathe because Sears had that unmentionable A---s lathe in their catalog. The Wards used the same bed as the later Logan branded units, so either headstock can fit.

    My Logan is from Feb 1942, sold to the Corps of Engineers, and has that Wards lathe headstock (Logan made Wards first, then a slightly different version Logan branded) Serial is likely to be something around 12,000 if I am correct about yours.

    Logan is still around, and supports the machines. Logan Home Page is the address. Logan Actuator is the company name, they make mine hoist accessories also. (your search will probably also come up with a law known as the "Logan Act", just scroll down to "Logan Actuator")

    A picture of headstock, and also of the face of the carriage apron would be very helpful in identifying the things you asked, and interesting to any of us owners of what are probably the same type machine..

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    Here is a picture. The drum switch was mounted there before I took it apart. I can take another when I get home.imag3325.jpg
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails imag3325.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    My Logan is from Feb 1942, sold to the Corps of Engineers, and has that Wards lathe headstock (Logan made Wards first, then a slightly different version Logan branded) Serial is likely to be something around 12,000 if I am correct about yours.
    Thanks, where can I find the serial on the machine?

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    It's at the end of the bed. Might be under the tailstock. It's stamped right next to the front V way.

    That hole and the bracket looking thing bolted on looks non-stock to me.

    ORIGINAL HEADSTOCK CAST FOR A LOGAN 10" MODEL 210 LATHE | eBay

    Ebay is full of parts for these things.

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    Here is the 210:

    Logan Engineering Co. - Publication Reprints - Model 210 Back Geared Screw Cutting Lathe | VintageMachinery.org

    They were along with the Wards equivelant very popular. The loagan lathes could be bought through Wards too. Yours is a bench model and was minimally equipped. Things like legs/chip pan, quick change gear box, lever cross slides, collet closers etc were bought as accessories.

    There were two series; the 800 series and yours, a 200 series. They shared the same bed profile and many parts and accessories but very different. 200 and 800 series lathes had entirely different headstock and carriage. QC box had different castings but shared most of the gears. When searching for parts for the headstock, carriage, counter shaft, gear covers look for parts off the 200 series.

    I have seen the switch as shown in the link and in front like yours. Logan’s were sold without motor. Drum switch was and still very popular. The switch mounting plate is an original Logan part.

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    You will find serial numbers and model numbers here and a lot of very useful Logan information. Including how your lathe was originally configured.

    Logan FAQs

  9. #9
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    The hole is standard, just NOT standard for model 200 or 800 series units. Here's mine, which is a real post pearl Harbor FrankenLogan. You can see that the boss for the switch plate is "in the iron", and was a design feature. You can also see the two holes where the Wards nameplate would have been. Not sure about the other hole at left. Looks added later, but I never checked... I just use the thing..



    If yours is also a "FrankenLogan", the configuration info may be lacking. Basic stuff, sure, but details, no.

    Mine has several interesting features... First, the Wards headstock.. Then also, the carriage on it when I got it was a 9 1/4" long carriage, having the halfnut cage attached with two machine screws, AND it was a stamped metal halfnut cage. Later carriages are 10" long, and the halfnut cage is a cast part, attached with 4 hex head cap screws, and I subsequently replaced the original with one of those.

    Logan did not seem to have much if any information on the early war years machines, and Scott did not recall the short carriages and stamped metal parts. Obviously, the machines from that time were put together to fill urgent war orders, and since Wards was not going to get any more of them, the parts were available for use in the war orders.. I understand it was pretty much a zoo, with every department of the government wanting stuff now, so it is hardly a surprise that records are a bit sparse. But Logan did know that mine had been shipped to the Army in Feb 1942, just a couple months after declaration of war.

    Yes, mine does not have the "drive box"... It actually has a Southbend countershaft assembly, which I much prefer to the drive box. it came to me that way, and may originally had a similar countershaft, because the Wards units did not use the drive box.

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    Yup, Looks just like that... My SN is 13773, so sometime in 1942. Here are a few pics. My parts are just piled into the corner of my garage at the moment. The finished tail stock has been painted and any parts my hands would touch have been blued. Keeping it clean and simple.imag3345.jpgimag3346.jpgimag3343.jpgimag3344.jpg

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    I like the blue.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Quade View Post
    I like the blue.
    Too many gray machines out there...


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