shipbreaking----category 5 storm style
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    western washington state
    Posts
    3,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2243
    Likes (Received)
    3472

    Default shipbreaking----category 5 storm style

    August 1969---I rode out Hurricane Camille on northern border of evacuation zone

    when the National Guard allowed limited traffic access to Gulf Coast highway around 8 days after storm I was one of the first thru barricades

    the most impressive sight is almost never commented upon by media--that of freighters --attempting to ride out storm at anchorage one mile off shore--beached within feet of Gulf Coast Hwy--only one pic --other than my own--illustrates storm forces which are almost fictional--
    if you look closely at pic one--Alamo Victory-- you will notice partial transection of ship --my direct observation of that occurrence was 50% penetration just forward amidship --starboard

    these were freighters in 300 ft class of estimated 8-11,000 tons

    as I returned monthly Bucyrus crawler lattice cranes were at work assisting shipbreaking--a few years prior to birth of federal agency OSHA and the 900 page volume the agency published regulating this practice
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails jhgy.jpg   dfsyuyt.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Lambertville, MI USA
    Posts
    2,531
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1061
    Likes (Received)
    1121

    Default

    Is it ever attempted to refloat ships like these, or is it a always a total write off?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    312
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    123
    Likes (Received)
    140

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SIP6A View Post
    Is it ever attempted to refloat ships like these, or is it a always a total write off?
    They can refloat with large airbags or other means. Depends on when the cost of the work exceeds the value of the ship.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    savannah, jaw-ja
    Posts
    1,720
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1159
    Likes (Received)
    403

    Default

    There was one about that size parked several hundred feet inshore in Miami after Andrew. I left not long after, don't know what they did about it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Brusly, LA
    Posts
    721
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    20
    Likes (Received)
    290

    Default

    after every major storm there is always ships, barges, houseboats, oil field equipment pushed onshore/ into the marsh, etc. People don't realize that storm surge may only give an official water level rise of 10 feet, but that 10 feet has waves and will rock/float stuff way inshore. Sometimes the insurance companies and salvage companies can get them, sometimes they cant/wont. However after about 5-10 years of no maintenance in the Louisiana marsh they rust away into nothing fairly quickly.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    4,085
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4385
    Likes (Received)
    2053

    Default

    Cool pictures.
    Good friend worked in Prudhoe Bay for a decade and he sent me pictures of them pulling huge barges from the bay in the fall with Cat Dozers and rubber bladders. Guess sometimes they can't get stuff out before the bay freezes so they have to pull it out or lose it up there.

  7. Likes JHOLLAND1, JoeE. liked this post
  8. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Davidson NC USA
    Posts
    1,420
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    511
    Likes (Received)
    808

    Default

    Camille not only added some things to the shore, she totally removed many, many man-made constructs.

  9. Likes JHOLLAND1 liked this post
  10. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Arkansas
    Posts
    9
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Great pictures. The power of water... I was on the M/V Atlantic Sentry in Port Canaveral when the Challenger blew up and the Navy brought in a salvage ship from Goteborg, Sweden called the Stena Workhorse. It made our ship look like a Tonka Toy. Some of those salvors can work miracles but like you say, if the value of the ship doesn't exceed the cost...

  11. Likes JoeE. liked this post
  12. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    2,167
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15434
    Likes (Received)
    925

    Default

    Great timing.

    I've recently spent countless hours watching youtube videos produced by a few of the Dutch salvage companies showing their prowess at refloating sunken ships and other humongous items.

    They do some monumentally difficult tasks, in oftentimes horrendous conditions. I can't imagine how daunting of a task it would be and how they don't just throw up their hands and call it a wash.

    It is amazing what they can do. Watching a ship being "parbuckled" is amazing! Who'd have ever dreamed up something like that!!!????

    And, a lot of it is because of the mathematical prowess of their engineering staff.

    After watching the lengths they go to, for their customer, to get the job done....I can only imagine the amount of money that is spent. The rigging that is manufactured, winches, strand jacks, cables, chains... it's unimaginable what they have access to and what they build on a moments notice.

    If it's that expensive to get a ship off a reef, can you imagine what Lloyd's of London charges these guys to insure their vessels? That expense gets passed on down the food chain, to us, sooner or later.

  13. Likes SplinterFingers liked this post
  14. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    New to forum. Looking for antique elevator. Don’t know how to post on forum. Do you know when there is on for sale?

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    5,691
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    261
    Likes (Received)
    1425

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeE. View Post
    Great timing.

    I've recently spent countless hours watching youtube videos produced by a few of the Dutch salvage companies showing their prowess at refloating sunken ships and other humongous items.

    They do some monumentally difficult tasks, in oftentimes horrendous conditions. I can't imagine how daunting of a task it would be and how they don't just throw up their hands and call it a wash.

    It is amazing what they can do. Watching a ship being "parbuckled" is amazing! Who'd have ever dreamed up something like that!!!????

    And, a lot of it is because of the mathematical prowess of their engineering staff.

    After watching the lengths they go to, for their customer, to get the job done....I can only imagine the amount of money that is spent. The rigging that is manufactured, winches, strand jacks, cables, chains... it's unimaginable what they have access to and what they build on a moments notice.

    If it's that expensive to get a ship off a reef, can you imagine what Lloyd's of London charges these guys to insure their vessels? That expense gets passed on down the food chain, to us, sooner or later.
    One of their greatest achievment was salvaging the Russian submarine Kursk

    Peter

  16. Likes JoeE. liked this post
  17. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Americus, Georgia
    Posts
    395
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    522
    Likes (Received)
    118

    Default

    Dorado, you need to start a new thread with the correct title.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •