Sip MP4 Jig Borer
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  1. #1
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    Default Sip MP4 Jig Borer

    I have a SIP jig borer model MP4, serial #88. I would like to obtain any information on this model. Thanks all.

  2. #2
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    Could you post some pictures?

    I have material on #4 SIP jig borer's but don't know if I have anything on a machine that old.

  3. #3
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    Thanks. Here are some pics of the machine. My guess is early 1920's but I'd like to be able to verify that. p2210043.jpgp2210044.jpgp2210045.jpgp2210046.jpg

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    Very nice-I used to have No.166 and I thought that was old!

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    Hello. I have a question regarding the MP-4 jig borer. I've bought a machine of this type but, sadly, the transportation company dropped it in-transit. Apparently, they dropped it on its side which resulted in a bent slotted driveshaft, broken upper bracket of said driveshaft and broken transmission from the vertical slotted shaft to the horizontal one. But what worries me the most is the geometry of the main frame. Could this machine survive a side-fall without it's main frame being skewed?


    I think I could find a welder competent enaugh to repair the broken bracket and the transmission casing and I think I could straighten the driveshaft but if the geometry of the main frame is gone it's beyond my skill. Is it even worth checking up the geometry or it's definitely gone? I'd be very gratefull for an opinion or an advice from a person who is knowledgeable with such machines. I feel really bad about scrapping such a historical machine.

    1111.jpg

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    Your machine is scrap, start looking for another machine.

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  8. #7
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    I'm afraid it's damaged beyond repair. The alignments of the major elements are super critical and they're bound to be disturbed.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    If it was mine I would spend about 10 minutes to check some alignments. If the 10 min check looked good then go back in and do a real check, if the 10 minute check shows bad then no need to waste any more time on it.
    We or you dont really know what it landed on, it could have crushed a pile of boxes (marked fragile of course) that softened the landing. I think if it fell off the truck it would be more broken.
    If it turns out that the bent shaft& broken cover cover is the only damage go quickly and buy a lottery ticket
    If it is bad you can always buy another one and have this one for parts.

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    As a fellow owner if an MP-4,
    I would like to offer my sympathy for your situation.
    These machines are just so beautiful.
    I hope you check your machine out and find it not too bad.
    Best of luck.

    -Doozer

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    As a fellow owner if an MP-4,
    I would like to offer my sympathy for your situation.
    These machines are just so beautiful.
    I hope you check your machine out and find it not too bad.
    Best of luck.

    -Doozer
    The place I served my time at had the 1940's version of that machine. It was in a sort of greenhouse/ shed that had been partially made from the packing case it came in during the 1939-45 War. Wood was hard to come by in those days apparently.

    They are a work of art in my opinion but you can't give them away over here nowadays.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Hey Tyrone,
    Very cool that you used one of these MP-4 machines.
    I have the exact machine that Glassman has pictured here.
    I have a question....
    Are there any safety stops for the down and up quill feed?
    I have been very careful not to allow them to feed the quill
    to the limits. Just wondering.
    Also, there seems to be a drain hose from the table area
    that goes back to the sump of the transmission gearbox.
    Additionally, on the reansmission gearbox, there seems to
    be what resembles an oil pump. It has a plug in a pipe
    thread port. All this make me think that the transmission
    gearbox has a pump that can be used to pump gearbox oil
    for use as a coolant/lubricant for cutting/drilling/boring.
    Seems very odd to use gearbox oil for cutting lubricant,
    but sure enough it appears that the table drains back to
    the gearbox sump. Any insight into this??
    Also, how much did you use the small spindle?
    Mine has a WW 8mm collet. Thanks.

    --Doozer

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    The place I served my time at had the 1940's version of that machine. It was in a sort of greenhouse/ shed that had been partially made from the packing case it came in during the 1939-45 War. Wood was hard to come by in those days apparently.

    They are a work of art in my opinion but you can't give them away over here nowadays.

    Regards Tyrone.
    If you want` to give an MP-4 to me Tyrone, feel free, it might have to sit in my lounge though? Or any other SIP would be most welcome for that matter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doozer View Post
    Hey Tyrone,
    Very cool that you used one of these MP-4 machines.
    I have the exact machine that Glassman has pictured here.
    I have a question....
    Are there any safety stops for the down and up quill feed?
    I have been very careful not to allow them to feed the quill
    to the limits. Just wondering.
    Also, there seems to be a drain hose from the table area
    that goes back to the sump of the transmission gearbox.
    Additionally, on the reansmission gearbox, there seems to
    be what resembles an oil pump. It has a plug in a pipe
    thread port. All this make me think that the transmission
    gearbox has a pump that can be used to pump gearbox oil
    for use as a coolant/lubricant for cutting/drilling/boring.
    Seems very odd to use gearbox oil for cutting lubricant,
    but sure enough it appears that the table drains back to
    the gearbox sump. Any insight into this??
    Also, how much did you use the small spindle?
    Mine has a WW 8mm collet. Thanks.

    --Doozer
    Sorry matey, I was only an apprentice then. The guy who ran it was very proud of the machine and you were only allowed in the shed by special invitation so I didn't know a great deal about it. I just know he keep it in pristine condition and I was occasionally sent in to help in lifting large components off the table with him. I wasn't that young that I couldn't recognise a lovely piece of engineering though.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    As it turns out, my SIP MP4 #88 was made in 1928 and shipped originally to GE in Lowell MA. I have used it for almost 10 yeas as a measuring machine to measure highly accurate aspheric lenses up to 300mm in diameter to a surface form accuracy of 0.002mm. Remarkable for 1928! A truly beautiful machine. Shortly, this one will be on its way back to the SIP (Starrag) headquarter in Switzerland for display in their archives. I've done this with a couple other machines-sending them home. Happy Thanksgiving to all.

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  19. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    The place I served my time at had the 1940's version of that machine. It was in a sort of greenhouse/ shed that had been partially made from the packing case it came in during the 1939-45 War. Wood was hard to come by in those days apparently.

    They are a work of art in my opinion but you can't give them away over here nowadays.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Not anymore, hard to find thus making reasonable money again if you can find one, and then if its a big un you need deep pockets to pay to move it

  20. #16
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    Glassman - that is indeed a beautiful machine. Sorry I can't add to your knowledge base on it.

    I do, however, have questions about the custom base as depicted in the photos.

    Was that made for that machine specifically or adapted for it from another use ?

    Construction details of the base itself ?

    Any particular rationale for the multi-level surfaces (swarf, etc.)?

    thanks.

  21. #17
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    The base is part of the machine. It was made that way becouse of the foundry practice of the time it was made.


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