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  1. #21
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    Sorry, This FREE time is hard for me to wrap my head around. As an owner/operator of a dairy/cash crop farm, ANY time I am not working on it has a price whether it is reduced production or hiring out more jobs done. Anyways, if you are set on making a chuck wrench, please do show us how you went about it! I for one am always interested in solutions to such problems!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyLilMule View Post
    I like the way you didn't offend every hobbyist in any field by not over generalizing and diminishing them.

    I'm a hobbyist. I LIKE TO MAKE THINGS AS A HOBBY. Why the fart would I buy something for $45 when I can make it a fun project?

    If it was all about the Benjamins, I wouldn't have bought a lathe and a Bridgeport and all the tooling I have SO FAR. It'd be soooooo much CHEAPER.

    But since I'm too cheap to pay $45 for a key, I'll just buy a lathe and a mill and all that tooling and make one myself. Because I'm cheap.
    i make lots of things to but i will stand by what i say as a seller of thing i hate cheep people all the time crying about money . i don't give a fuck for the most part if someone buys my goods or not but don't bore me to death about why you don't want to buy it or can't afford to buy it . at the used car salesman would say there's an ass for every seat . and if you are so thin skinned that you feel offended well so be it as i would rather be hated for something i am then loved for something i am not . and if you don't like it just keep putting fuel on the fire.

  3. #23
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    Did these guys miss a commission from not selling that wrench to you? Sheesh, the man wants to make his own so let him be.

    As a hobby guy I’ve literally grabbed junk out of my junk bin and turned/milled it down into smaller junk, I spent my time to buy experience and joy/relaxation/meditation.

    “Zen milling break” as blondihacks would call it.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homebrewblob View Post
    I’ve literally grabbed junk out of my junk bin and turned/milled it down into smaller junk,
    You get a net REDUCTION?

    That's freakin' MAGICAL...!!!

    Anytime I try it, I end up with a greater mass of mess and junque than I started with...

    .. plus the "new" speciality tools or machinery acquired to make the attempt.


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  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1yesca View Post
    hobbyist are the cheapest group of people you will ever find no mater what field it is . .......................
    Hobby folks make stuff they could buy because of two things....maybe three....

    1) They are "permanent apprentices", and they do a lot of "apprentice projects" for practice.

    2) It's a hobby, no worse than playing golf, and more productive in some ways. If they want something they can make in a reasonable time, they will, because often, any shop time is good for them.

    3) Not making money at it means they don't "recover costs", they can't bill tooling and consumables to anyone. So they watch what they spend... Like anyone else, they are not made of money.

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  8. #26
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    When I first saw this thread I took a look at my Skinner chuck that came with a Brown and Sharpe 10 N grinder.
    Mine has a small Key that looks like it was numbered by Brown and Sharpe to conform with the other part numbers on the machine.
    I my case the chuck has 7/16" square ends on the adjusting screws .
    My first thought was to suggest using a square hole sleeve to make a wrench if the chuck wasn't going to see heavy duty use since the sleeve's I have aren't hardened .
    I didn't check the current prices on the sleeves but when I got mine to use instead of a square collet for a non precision application they were perhaps in the 10 or 15 dollars for the smaller sizes..
    I tried a search to find a link to a picture and noticed that there are several types of adapters that are available now for square ,Hex. and splines that I didn't remember seeing before.
    There are even some that are heat treated .
    Square Hole Tool Bit Sleeves - BLD PRECISION TOOLS & ACCESSORIES
    https://www.sdp-si.com/eStore/..%5Cs...5C79004023.PDF
    Square Hole Sleeve - Google Search
    I didn't check any prices but thought I'd share the links in case someone who has not seen them before might find one or more of them useful one day for a project.
    I don't want to wade into the value of the time to make against the cost to buy argument .
    While they may not suit every one or every situation I know in my case buying worked out better for me than buying a broach , finding someone with square broaches or trying to file the square into the round hole .
    I got a few sizes while I was at it and I think the largest I have is 1" square and the smallest 1/8" square.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscf0885.jpg   dscf0884.jpg   dscf0888.jpg  

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  10. #27
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    Great tip on the square hole sleeves. I never thought about those. Found this one on eBay: Sturdy square hole sleeve #P43 (7/16" square ) | eBay
    I'll have to keep it in mind when I go about making this. Could be the right beginning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MyLilMule View Post
    Great tip on the square hole sleeves. I never thought about those. Found this one on eBay: Sturdy square hole sleeve #P43 (7/16" square ) | eBay
    I'll have to keep it in mind when I go about making this. Could be the right beginning.
    Covered early in-thread that even MMC has a whole page.

    The problem was/is.. that neither of the 12 mm size nor the US size the chuck used is among any of the standard sizes OTHERWISE tick-the-shopping-cart common.

    Easy solution?

    Buy the next smaller STANDARD size and modify the square ends of the screws in the chuck down to fit that. It is close enough in overall strength to work just fine.

    And will NO LONGER be a bastard size, going forward.

  12. #29
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    I seriously NEVER read anything you have to say anymore. LOL! I had my fill of you months ago. Even pointing this out to you is a waste of my time. HAHAHAHA!

    screen-shot-2021-07-24-11.02.50-am.jpg

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    Qty (5) days have gone by....you could have bent some 1/8" steel strip in a vise to make (2) angles, weld them together at the corners, and you'[d be done by now.....cripes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Qty (5) days have gone by....you could have bent some 1/8" steel strip in a vise to make (2) angles, weld them together at the corners, and you'[d be done by now.....cripes.
    Qty (0) f*cks given.

    Meh. Not in a rush.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4GSR View Post
    Bill,

    If you would spend less time filling this forum with your "comments" you would have all sorts of time to spend in your shop making stuff that you could show us pictures of here on PM.



    Thank you Ken. So needed

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    You could hit contact the seller at eBay and offer 25 or $30. It would be to your benefit to have the original wrench..Likely it might be heat-treat to 40-48 and so be a very good wrench.

    Vintage Skinner Chuck Co. Square Nut Off Set Lathe Wrench | eBay

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  20. #34
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    Perhaps I will. It's not a big deal to me to have an original wrench. I'm not a collector nor nostalgic. I didn't pay much more for the dividing head, all of the hole plates, and the chuck itself, than it would be for me to buy that wrench and have it shipped to me. So I have room in the budget. But in all seriousness, it's not the least bit important to me to have a matching wrench, just one that worked. I'm very new to machining (duh - like that was hard to tell) and had not seen a chuck like this before. Learning new things all the time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    You could hit contact the seller at eBay and offer 25 or $30. It would be to your benefit to have the original wrench..Likely it might be heat-treat to 40-48 and so be a very good wrench.

    Vintage Skinner Chuck Co. Square Nut Off Set Lathe Wrench | eBay

    That's what .. the fourth time someone suggested he JF buy an OEM wrench?

    Waddya figure?

    Give it another month of whining, posturing, and stamping little hooves on the forum?

    I mean, fer f**k's sake - a CHUCK KEY is A Very Big Deal! Nobody ever made one but GOD!

    And you'd have to know mules for "stubborn?"


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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    That's what .. the fourth time someone suggested he JF buy an OEM wrench?

    Waddya figure?

    Give it another month of whining, posturing, and stamping little hooves on the forum?

    I mean, fer f**k's sake - a CHUCK KEY is A Very Big Deal! Nobody ever made one but GOD!

    And you'd have to know mules for "stubborn?"

    He might even buy it, that would be a good choice.

    Quote Originally Posted by MyLilMule View Post
    Perhaps I will. It's not a big deal to me to have an original wrench. I'm not a collector nor nostalgic. I didn't pay much more for the dividing head, all of the hole plates, and the chuck itself, than it would be for me to buy that wrench and have it shipped to me. So I have room in the budget. But in all seriousness, it's not the least bit important to me to have a matching wrench, just one that worked. I'm very new to machining (duh - like that was hard to tell) and had not seen a chuck like this before. Learning new things all the time.

  23. #37
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    Still casting about how to do this?

    1) turn the shank of the key with the shaft and the large end to size/length.

    2) flip around so the large end is pointing out from a four-jaw.

    3) bore the minor diameter a bit oversize.

    4) use a toolbit profiled as a shaper tool to shave the corners, 0.001 in(side)feed at a time.
    4a) use the four jaw chuck jaws as the indexing method.

    5) bonus if you open up the chuck and take the part out to use as a test gage, otherwise you'll have to hold the entire chuck up to test.

    6) cross-drill the shank and press in the handle.

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  25. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    Still casting about how to do this?

    1) turn the shank of the key with the shaft and the large end to size/length.

    2) flip around so the large end is pointing out from a four-jaw.

    3) bore the minor diameter a bit oversize.

    4) use a toolbit profiled as a shaper tool to shave the corners, 0.001 in(side)feed at a time.
    4a) use the four jaw chuck jaws as the indexing method.

    5) bonus if you open up the chuck and take the part out to use as a test gage, otherwise you'll have to hold the entire chuck up to test.

    6) cross-drill the shank and press in the handle.
    Phht... When the only tools you have are CUTTING tools?

    You tend to forget the value of heat and hammer.

    South Pittsburgh, "back in the day"?

    They taught us basic blacksmithing BEFORE we were allowed ANYWHERE NEAR ...."powered" machinery!

    If you could not master a hammer, who on Earth would let you get near a lathe?



    Torch, anvil, hammer, and a square or "four point" socket is soon had. They are, after all, rather SIMPLE creatures?

    Not as if it were a good old Connecticut Yankee-brilliant, AMERICAN MADE ... Bristo spline drive, after all.

    About, Ansonia, CT | Bristol Wrench

    "For extra credit..."

    Dare yah!


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    This explains your peculiar diction - hit yourself in the head too many times with a blacksmith's hammer eh.

    Spline wrenches, don't get me started. WW2-era command set transmitters could be converted to amateur service - except all the setscrews on the control shafts were hardened spline wrench type. Those had to be removed for the conversion and all I had at the time (11 years old...) was an eggbeater drill and hardware store drills.

    The setscrews were harder than billy goat dicks. It did not work out well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    This explains your peculiar diction - hit yourself in the head too many times with a blacksmith's hammer eh.

    Spline wrenches, don't get me started. WW2-era command set transmitters could be converted to amateur service - except all the setscrews on the control shafts were hardened spline wrench type. Those had to be removed for the conversion and all I had at the time (11 years old...) was an eggbeater drill and hardware store drills.

    The setscrews were harder than billy goat dicks. It did not work out well.
    Haven't a klew why you didn't simply use the standard-issue Bristo spline tools. Not as if they were hard to acquire.

    How was it you thought the military did maintenance?

    Speaking of beating yourself in the head.


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