Steam Engine Info Needed - Peanut Roaster? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Here is an interesting thread which may answer some of your questions regarding early construction of these small Box Bed type steam engines. Post Civil War small Box Bed Steam Engine.Post Civil War small Box Bed Steam Engine.

  2. #22
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    Very cool engine and I'd agree with most here. Not a scale model of any particular engine, those out of scale bolts indicate it was built to do fairly hard work and stay together while doing so. Just a guess, but designed from the start to perform an actual working task. And those square bolt heads and nuts would date it to maybe as late as mid to possibly later 1800's, although I'd say some of those square nuts on the valve cover aren't probably OEM since they don't match the rest of the build quality. The use of non standard or common thread pitches also reinforces the time period it might have been made in. He may or may not be able to identify it for certain, but one of the more knowledgeable people around for model and small working steam engines would be this YT channel.reddrryder - YouTube reddrryder - YouTube I dunno for sure, but it's pin stripping, nickle plating ect might be out of place for it's use in a business shop to drive something like one or two sewing machines or anything else in a more industrial setting. I'd lean towards a use in a more public place or at an exhibition of some type. Not that I have a whole lot of knowledge, but it's not one I've ever seen pictures of in the last 40 + years, so I'd say it's fairly rare or maybe even a one off? It's exact thread pitch and angle on those threads might give clues to being made somewhere in North America or not. Fwiw and it's certainly not definitive, my collection of British Model Engineer magazines covers 1898 - about 1960 and I haven't seen anything like it in those.

  3. #23
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    I didn't research their history to see if they go back far enough in time to be contemporary with Lester's engine but some brands of industrial sewing machines had their own proprietary screw and thread sizes .
    Singer
    Singer sewing machine screw threads and taps
    and Union Special are names I am familiar with .
    https://www.universalsewing.com/imag...l/raag5agq.pdf
    This older thread also turned up in a search I tried .
    Sewing machine screw thread sizes
    As did this.
    Sewing Parts Online: Search
    Maybe there were several other types of equipment that used their own screw sizes and the engine builder may have had access to those when making the engine.
    Jim

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  5. #24
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    Could be a fairground Duck engine.

  6. #25
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    Ted:

    Could you please explain what a "fairground Duck" is ? The engine seems small for driving any sort of amusement 'ride' as one might find at fairgrounds. Taking another WAG: are the "Ducks" you are referring to been used to a line of duck-shaped targets in a fairground shooting gallery ?

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    Yes-the ducks would go found in a water trough,while you took pops at them.

  8. #27
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    Here are a couple of pictures of the piston. This is the first steam engine piston I have seen. Is this a typical design or will this help in any way to further identify the engine. Thanks Ed

    piston-front.jpgpiston-side.jpg

  9. #28
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    Your engine is a nice little example of what we might call a portable engine in UK. It is well worth cleaning up and getting into running condition. Portable engines were used in much the same way that you might use a power tool or an electric motor these days. You needed a source of power on-site to do a specific job and this type of engine was ideal. They weren't fancy, they didn't have sophisticated valve gear and they were wasteful of steam, but that really didn't matter. Most of the survivors have had an extremely hard life (in UK anyway) so you will find badly worn piston rods, valve rods, bearings etc. At our museum we have one such engine on display (in reasonable condition), which we think was used for driving a portable boring setup that might be used for reboring cylinders, Corliss valve bores etc. Big mill engines needed to be repaired in-situ so this was one way to power a machine that would be built up around the mill engine. We think this engine was built by S S Stott Ltd of Haslingden. The slide valve is driven by an eccentric on the crankshaft that can easily be moved to another position to alter the timing so that the engine can run in either direction.

    Other (towards the bottom of the page)

    The rather nasty frame under the engine has long ago been replaced by something better!

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