Steptoe-Western 24" shaper questions - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Scotch Brite pads contain aluminum oxide and titanium oxide

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    Is the concern the abrasiveness or the residue left behind?

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    Both. Use of a powered tool with scotch brite will not leave a flat surface. Scotchbrite has an abrasive in the plastic fibers that can break off and hide in all sorts of places in a machine. When cleaning rust anything that leaves it bright is removing too much.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    Both. Use of a powered tool with scotch brite will not leave a flat surface. Scotchbrite has an abrasive in the plastic fibers that can break off and hide in all sorts of places in a machine. When cleaning rust anything that leaves it bright is removing too much.
    Good to know and thanks for the elaboration. I have a number of machines to clean up. I have used scotch bright pads on some stuff but only by hand and always with a lubricant (mostly kerosene) which i then cleaned off. But as you say, even though i'm pretty careful about cleaning the residue off, there's always a chance some is left behind in some hard to clean nook. I'll switch to steel wool.

    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by marka12161 View Post
    Good to know and thanks for the elaboration. I have a number of machines to clean up. I have used scotch bright pads on some stuff but only by hand and always with a lubricant (mostly kerosene) which i then cleaned off. But as you say, even though i'm pretty careful about cleaning the residue off, there's always a chance some is left behind in some hard to clean nook. I'll switch to steel wool.

    Mark
    According to Sunnen, using solvents while honing (kerosene is considered a solvent), drive the grit into the pores of the cast surface. Use honing oil (IIRC vegetable oil is an approved substitute for their honing oil)to float the grit out, keep wiping the surface after honing with more oil til it stays clean, then wash the surface with soap and water.
    This is the procedure I read some years back for honing cylinders......the same information seems applicable to all machined surfaces.
    The best approach is to keep abrasives away, then all these steps can be eliminated.

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    "...then wash the surface with soap and water."

    Until a white cloth shows no gray residue. That was my instruction from Lee at Barber's motorcycle museum years ago when he honed out my RZ-350 cylinders. You want to remove all grit.

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    There is also a product called big 45 that is used to remove rust from guns.

    I have also used a copper scraper made from a piece of heavy gauge copper.

    Along those lines there is also copper wool. It is not as aggressive as steel wool and sometimes leave a copper film if the surface is rough.

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    Does anyone know how the down feed handle comes off? I don't see any fastners on it the instructions show a woodruf key. Is it just pressed on?
    Thanks
    Richard

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    Default How do I post pictures to this thread? Just joined!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    Look for Steptoe shapers... not Steptoe-Western. The Steptoe shaper was designed in the 1800s and mdae by Western. The Steptoe/Western is a totally different design.
    Found a real nice steptoe shaper (think so)
    Along side a Sheldon 10” bench lathe looking to post some pics but can’t figure out how on here?

    Any help?

    Thanks!!

  11. #30
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    Sorry it took me so long.
    My Steptoe 16 inch has a very small set screw and a key holding the down feed crank on.img_20180621_124402930.jpgimg_20180621_124402930.jpg


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