Tapered pin removal
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  1. #1
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    Default Tapered pin removal

    I decided to do some repairs on my L&S carriage. Seem like the key driving the rack gear is half sheared. Handwheel moves the carriage but when I bring it to the carriage stop and apply pressure the handwheel jumps. Handwheel is not connected directly to the rack gear. It has a gear cut into the shaft, Handwheel is keyed to the shaft. Gear then meshes with another that is keyed to the rack gear shaft as per the parts manual. I'm thinking that key is half sheared. So I must remove the front cover, to do so I have to remove the feed direction shift handle. It's taper pinned to the shaft. I hoped it would come off with the cover but when I pry on the cover it jams against the handle. That handle is at the bottom of the carriage. Taper looks to have large side up and is slightly short of coming out the lower side. I'm hitting a pin punch with the side of a 3 pound hand sledge because I have no room to swing it. Pin does not seem to want to move! Any ideas on what might Help? I might try to drill id but other items like the feed shaft clutch assembly is in the way. Might be able to do it with a very long drill! Before I try maybe someone has a better way.

  2. #2
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    Floor jack or toe jack

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    Normally on a shaft you need to back up the opposite side with a heavy weight or rod length wise,otherwise you just end up mushrooming the small end as the spring effect just absorbs the impact.Also a heavy single blow works a lot better than a bunch of tapping.

    However it looks like you can't do either,so drilling and tapping if you can get it turned enough for access will be best;then use slide hammer or jack screw and spacers to pull it out.

    Making extended drills and taps is just part of the game.A 2 piece shaft collar drilled radaily if it will fit makes a good drill guide.Staying on center keeps from making a wallowed out mess.

    You can buy int ext threaded t/pins.Most of the time I just drill and ream some scrap round to hold the size of the pins I need then tap the pin in and machine the ends ,thread and cut to length.

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    hmmm, good idea! Chip pan will prevent me from using the Jack but I can support a portapower cylinder and make a punch from a dowel pin supported in a bushing so that only 1/8" protrudes enough to loosen the tapered pin! Thanks !!

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    Pushing with anything, jack, hammer, whatever is not the way to go. The pin is probably mushroomed now. Drill and tap the big end, cut off the formerly small end and use a slide hammer.

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    the last taper pin I went to drive out (a sweet little B&S #21 milling vise) gave me some trouble, and it turns out it had been DOUBLE sheared! the ends were in the collar, middle in the screw. I was sure I had the big end right (THIS time!) but even drilling it out, pounding pounding, nothing. finally figured it out, drilling BOTH ends and getting out a little stub from both. well, doubt that would happen in your situation, but just goes to show there is always a new problem out there!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Froneck View Post
    I decided to do some repairs on my L&S carriage. Seem like the key driving the rack gear is half sheared. Handwheel moves the carriage but when I bring it to the carriage stop and apply pressure the handwheel jumps. Handwheel is not connected directly to the rack gear. It has a gear cut into the shaft, Handwheel is keyed to the shaft. Gear then meshes with another that is keyed to the rack gear shaft as per the parts manual. I'm thinking that key is half sheared. So I must remove the front cover, to do so I have to remove the feed direction shift handle. It's taper pinned to the shaft. I hoped it would come off with the cover but when I pry on the cover it jams against the handle. That handle is at the bottom of the carriage. Taper looks to have large side up and is slightly short of coming out the lower side. I'm hitting a pin punch with the side of a 3 pound hand sledge because I have no room to swing it. Pin does not seem to want to move! Any ideas on what might Help? I might try to drill id but other items like the feed shaft clutch assembly is in the way. Might be able to do it with a very long drill! Before I try maybe someone has a better way.
    If a taper-pin will not "give it up" early-on, it is faster to "just quit" screwing with it and go directly to drilling it out.

    No shortage of factory-made long drills in this world. Too MANY "BFH" or ... fer hem's SAKE?

    Jacks?.

    How badly was it you wanted for f**k-up something harder to deal with than an innocent taper pin, anyway? Crack a casting do yah?




    Even LESS of a shortage of "long" drills you simply make a "D" drill for yerself, wotever size and length suits the need.

    YES you should use a guide. It can be two-piece, like a ground-rod clamp or an IC motor's con-rod big-end.

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    Removing taper pins is an art form. There are some simple rules that must never be broken. Always use the biggest hammer you can swing. and thoroughly support the item that is pinned. Remember you want push not shock. A heavy hammer going slow will prevent mushrooming the pin. Very often, it is a two man job. You usually only get one chance at this before you get the drill out, observe the rules!

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    I've removed many tapered pins. Some were a real pain in da butt. Unfortunately the location of this pin on the bottom of the carriage don't allow for another man not even a small boy! I know a good sharp blow with a bigger hammer is better than tapping it with a small one but it's only about 8" above the chip pan. I did prepare to drill it as I have quite a few 12" long small drills (Aircraft Length) if not the right size McMaster will have one here the next day. I used a long center punch and have a dimple on the big side but when I did it the feel felt like I pushed the pin in. I might still try the portapower with a punch made from 1" round about 1" long and a 1/8" dowel pin 1-1/8" long in it so that only 1/8" protrudes. Pump up the cylinder and try tapping on the shaft possibly the vibration will loosen it. If not I'll dig out the long drill or call McMaster.

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    I worked with an old guy once was of the opinion taper pins should be rivetted over after being driven in hard....Old Tommy,he had no teeth ,and his tongue used to dart in and out like a lizard.He never washed his clothes either ,and always wore a collar and tie........One time someone said to me ...You know old Tommy teaches piano and dancing?...True .said the foreman,he does.

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    Use a split shaft collar, drill a hole for the large end of the pin in one half. Put it on over the pin and tighten up the two bolts, as it tightens against the small end it should push out the pin. If it wont push it out, you can either drill and tap the other half of the collar for a jacking bolt to push the pin out, or use the hole in the other half as a drill guide.

  16. #12
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    Thanks guys! The split collar is a good idea but in this case the pin is in a handle. Only round for slightly less than 180°. However I did manage to remove it today. I tried the portapower method I mentioned but it didn't work. I dug out a few 12" drills and managed to drill it out and removed the handle. Now I have to figure out how to remove the Oil pump handle. I can't see any taper pin or set screw. Was free to move very easy but prying on the cover it has now hard to move so it must be removed. I have the parts manual so I'll look to see how it's attached.


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