Thinking of parting with my camelback drill
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  1. #1
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    Default Thinking of parting with my camelback drill

    I havent used this drill since I got the radial drill a few years ago. Thinking of parting ways with it since space is become of short supply. Thought Id post it on here to see if there was any local interest first. Im thinking 200 but lmk if Im out of line. Like to see it receive a good home and not end up in the scrap pile.

    Jeff
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails drill-1.jpg   drill-2.jpg   drill-3.jpg  

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    I think $200 is low, but it depends how quick you want to sell it, and whether the buyer appreciates old things or just "needs a drill". It looks like a really nice drill.

    Andy

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy FitzGibbon View Post
    I think $200 is low, but it depends how quick you want to sell it, and whether the buyer appreciates old things or just "needs a drill". It looks like a really nice drill.

    Andy
    I'd agree, as a ready to run drill vs. barn save, $200 is way low.

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    $200 might be low but I wouldn't spend that for it. The flat belt is a real turn-off. It's not that it's a bad drill, it's just that it's old and dangerous to use. As something to collect, it's fine, as something to use every day, I'd buy a different drill press.

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    I'd buy it - always wanted one - can't see where its located - if it is close i'm interested

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregoryd View Post
    I'd buy it - always wanted one - can't see where its located - if it is close i'm interested
    It is located near Shelby, Ohio. Not close to you unfortunately.

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    thanks jeff - not sure why locations are not showing up for me - or i can't get to profiles - maybe its my tablet

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy FitzGibbon View Post
    I think $200 is low, but it depends how quick you want to sell it, and whether the buyer appreciates old things or just "needs a drill". It looks like a really nice drill.

    Andy
    I really wasnt sure what it would be worth. Dont see many ready to go ones for sale really. I kinda hate to even get rid of it really but could use the space. I have another building I could put it in but I know Id never use it there. Just thought if someone here who would appreciate it was interested Id like it to have a good home. If not- Ill just keep it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quade View Post
    $200 might be low but I wouldn't spend that for it. The flat belt is a real turn-off. It's not that it's a bad drill, it's just that it's old and dangerous to use. As something to collect, it's fine, as something to use every day, I'd buy a different drill press.
    Definitely not the drill to buy if you are using one every day imo. It is old and slow and something you need to use your head and watch where you are putting your hands (as any machinist should be doing on any machine really). More suited for the hobbyist who appreciates fine old machines and occassionally needs a bigger drill imo. I have a much smaller more modern drill that does 80 percent of my drilling tasks. Before I got the radial drill this was what I used for the bigger stuff that the small drill didnt want to handle.

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    I did also want to note that this drill does not have power feed.

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    I fail to understand why an old flat belt machine in seemingly nice condition is criticized as obsolete in an antique machinery forum. Did I miss the point??

    Tom B.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quade View Post
    $200 might be low but I wouldn't spend that for it. The flat belt is a real turn-off. It's not that it's a bad drill, it's just that it's old and dangerous to use. As something to collect, it's fine, as something to use every day, I'd buy a different drill press.
    Flat-belt a turn-off, then watch for a Royersford 22", all double V double belt drive, power feed, crank table, etc., last model they made. I've seen camelback style drills with guarding still running in commercial shops.
    Last edited by reggie_obe; 06-09-2019 at 05:05 PM.

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    Old yes but why is it dangerous? I have had one for years and have used it without any problems... Anything in the machine shop can be dangerous no matter what it is or how old it is... Respect and common sense is the key.. Unfortunately, common sense this day and time can be a very uncommon thing... I would buy that drill in a New York minute and use it without hesitation..Cheers; Ramsay 1

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    Quote Originally Posted by Quade View Post
    $200 might be low but I wouldn't spend that for it. The flat belt is a real turn-off. It's not that it's a bad drill, it's just that it's old and dangerous to use. As something to collect, it's fine, as something to use every day, I'd buy a different drill press.
    Every sentence here makes me wonder why you're posting in the antique forum.

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    Andy:

    AMEN ! I agree and I wondered that same thing reading Quade's post. I've got a 25" Cincinnati Camelback drill and use it regularly without incident. If this particular drill were in close reach, I would buy it in a flash for my blacksmith shop. Can't have enough anvils or camelback drills !

    I went to Brooklyn Technical High School 1964-68. We kids worked in machine shop classes with line shaft driven machine tools. Plenty of unguarded flat belts, and our teachers showed us who to "walk" a moving belt up or down a set of step cone pulleys. We ran machine tools from the 1920's and some War Production Board machine tools, 24" shapers, radial drills, camelback drills, engine lathes and more. No one- and this was in a school with a maximum attendance of 6000 boys- got seriously injured. In our freshman year in foundry classes, we poured aluminum and bronze. We poured iron in our junior year.

    Plainly, it was a time when kids, let alone adults, were expected to have some common sense and take responsibility for their own actions. None of the machine tools had much in the way of guards, and there were no safety stickers, or interlocking safety devices. Gearing was guarded, but belts were often out in the open. I worked in machine shops after school and summers thru HS and college, and we worked with what was there- including open flat belts, unguarded rotating shafting and pulleys, and even grinders did not have the eye-shields. It was up to the person using the machine tools, even the pedestal grinders- to wear goggles and roll up their sleeves if there was a chance of a lathe dog or belt lacing catching it. Common sense and responsibility for one's own actions are what it was and still is about. The old saying on the safety signs in shops and mills often read: "Safety begins with YOU !". A lot of truth to it. The governmental agencies can mandate all manner of guards and safety interlocks and multi-lingual warning stickers, and the lawyers can have manufacturers building even more safeguards into products... and people will still manage to wind up getting injured using those products.

    I just got done with the annual presentation of "Steam Power 101" at Hanford Mills Museum. We take a random group of people who want to learn about steam power and over a weekend, we teach them the basics of some engineering and practical subjects, with time spent firing and running the steam plant. Lineshaft driven woodworking will with plenty of unguarded flat belts, plenty of head-knockers in the form of line shaft bearing hangers in the lower elevations of the mill for a person to find the hard way, or get scalped by a moving belt. I joke that nothing is automatic in the Hanford Mills steam plant except the safety valves on the boiler and the governors on the engines. It is up to the people assigned to firing to maintain the proper water level to prevent a low water incident (potential for an explosion), and similar.

    I stress safety and "situational awareness" as it now called. IOW: know where all your body parts are and make sure they are in safe places around machinery and running plant systems and equipment. A camelback drill is like anything else. Use it properly, take responsibility for your own actions, and things will be OK. Do something stupid and get wound up in the drill or caught by the "lacing" (hooks) on a moving flat belt and chances are pretty good it is a person's own fault or stupidity or carelessness. As was famously said in a popular movie: "There ain't no fixing stupid". Modern society has been progressively dumbed down, relies increasingly on artificial intelligence to tell them their every move and keep them amused and to remember stuff for them. If they can't find it on a smart phone, plenty of the current population is lost. I stress using one's mind and senses around machinery and to "read the little clues" and "use the eyes in your head to input to your brain and figure things out for yourselves". If a person thinks a flat belt is dangerous, let them go play with stuff from Home Depot with all the bells, whistles, safety stickers, interlocking controls and light-duty design for novice homeowners. This is not the place for them to pass judgement. I've know a few people wind up their hands with so-called lighter duty cordless drills and one person needed surgery. Anything- even bedding (yeah, a person could roll over in bed and smother themselves with their pillow)- could be construed as "dangerous" by people like Quade. Heck, now he might be thinking of how to make his bed safer and prevent potential self-smothering....

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    Today everything is dangerous... Everything is to be feared.. A camel back drill is no more dangerous than any other machine tool... If you do something stupid, you pay the price just like with anything else....Young people today have been taught to fear everything and need warning labels on everything.. I bought a garden hose watering wand the other day and there was a warning label telling me to not spray water in the areas of electric lines... What ever happened to common sense? Ramsay 1

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    Quote Originally Posted by ramsay1 View Post
    What ever happened to common sense? Ramsay 1
    Lawyers and the internet, in no particular order.

    I had a camelback DP, got rid of it when I got an Arboga radial arm drill. Some of the stuff I have is definitely museum vintage rather than current machine shop but the DP was a step too far. I just want to drill holes and the Arboga is a lot less hassle to get that done.

    I still have 2 flat belt planers though and while I might part with one of them if the right person comes along, not the other one.

    PDW

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  24. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ramsay1 View Post
    What ever happened to common sense? Ramsay 1
    ...& personal accountability.

    For $200 it wouldn't last more than a couple hours if it was posted here.... cause I'd buy it. GL hope it finds a good home!

    Martin

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  26. #19
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    i f it where closer or someone could snag it for me i would buy it, and use it. next to a couple others i have.


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