Treadle Lathe Identification
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default Treadle Lathe Identification

    I recently purchased this treadle lathe and I can't find any manufacturer's mark. Since the threading plaque is in German, I assume that it's made somewhere in Germany. But I'd like to know by who, and when. Can anyone help? I'd also like to know if anyone can explain for me the 2 rectangular frames, 1 of which attaches to the saddle , and the other one that attaches to the ways. Many thanks in advance.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20210602_164731.jpg   20210615_173507.jpg   20210608_181243.jpg   20210608_181106.jpg  

  2. Likes DeSelle liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Oz
    Posts
    401
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    19
    Likes (Received)
    87

    Default

    Johann Weisser as a guess, it is fairly late model, but either non-screw cutting or pre quick change gearbox era.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    14,091
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    827
    Likes (Received)
    4820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by technocrat View Post
    Johann Weisser as a guess, it is fairly late model, but either non-screw cutting or pre quick change gearbox era.
    The threading chart for English (inch) and metric threads shows the 127 tooth gear is used to cut metric threads. So it cuts threads and the leadscrew has an inch thread. I would guess that the feed screws also have inch threads, but the owner did not say. Looks like a nice old machine.

    Some American lathes were sold with a choice of change gears or quick change until late in the 20th century. It affected the price, of course, so it was to help sell machines to less affluent customers.

    Tony has pictures of old J G Weisser lathes with rectangular opening steady rests that hold inserts, but the inserts do not seem to be in the pictures. Perhaps the inserts look like steam engine connecting rod brasses.
    J.G.Weisser Lathes

    Larry

  5. Likes Jim Christie liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    54
    Likes (Received)
    137

    Default

    That is an impressive counterweight on the flywheel !

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stratham, Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    4,560
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    550
    Likes (Received)
    1962

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom A View Post
    That is an impressive counterweight on the flywheel !
    I hope the crank/connecting rod to the treadle is made so if you inadvertently get your toe under the treadle, you don't break your toe.

    Joe in NH

  8. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,440
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    181
    Likes (Received)
    1777

    Default

    Don't know a thing about these, but it's really fantastic. I notice there are no oilers on the headstock bearings. Could it be rolling bearings, or just a hidden wick somewhere? I know I don't have the leg power to keep a thing like that going for very long!

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    L'Orignal, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,444
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2705
    Likes (Received)
    1102

    Default

    I'm Wondering if the Steady rest may also have used some form of hardwood blocking or packing depending on the job at hand as a bearing block .
    Perhaps something like Lignum Vitae that was sometimes used used on ships propeller shafts .\
    Lignum vitae - Wikipedia
    You can see a similar type of steady rest in a lathe in the pictures below .
    I presume it is being used to steady the centre of the long forged rods with the offset links on the floor near the lathe while the ends were being turned .
    I posted this picture in this thread a long time ago but managed to rotate it this time
    Robertson and Orchar
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails pic2-2-.jpg   pic2.jpg  

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    Don't know a thing about these, but it's really fantastic. I notice there are no oilers on the headstock bearings. Could it be rolling bearings, or just a hidden wick somewhere? I know I don't have the leg power to keep a thing like that going for very long!
    I went and had a look at the lubrication provisions. The spindle and lead screw all have open holes, except for the drive end of the lead screw. It has a little cover that can be rotated to expose and close the oil hole. Perhaps the spindle also had these at one stage. The screws for the cross slide and the top slide (compound) are open holes and would not have been fitted with these covers.
    As for leg power, they say you learn how to sharpen your tools really well!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20211018_080909.jpg   20211018_080926.jpg   20211018_080941.jpg  

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    54
    Likes (Received)
    137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Christie View Post
    I posted this picture in this thread a long time ago but managed to rotate it this time
    Robertson and Orchar
    I think it's interesting, that it looks like the guys in the 2nd photo are all wearing the same kind of hat.....

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    14,091
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    827
    Likes (Received)
    4820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom A View Post
    I think it's interesting, that it looks like the guys in the 2nd photo are all wearing the same kind of hat.....
    It is called a flat cap in the UK and has other regional names. I got one in 1967 to wear when I drove my MGB with the top down because it resists being blown off your head in wind. I still have one folded up in my raincoat pocket. Other than sportscar drivers, the caps are favored by working men, as opposed to "gentlemen." Remember Fred Dibnah, the chimney wrecker? He wore a flat cap in almost every video/movie scene. But there was at least one shot of him without the cap revealing a very bald top. A sunburn on the top of your head is not fun. I know.

    Hard to tell in the picture, but at least some of the men might be wearing the similar hat with a fuller top called a newsboy cap.

    Newsboy cap - Wikipedia

    Flat cap - Wikipedia

    Larry

  13. Likes Jim Christie liked this post
  14. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    L'Orignal, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,444
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2705
    Likes (Received)
    1102

    Default

    Tom A,
    I hadn't thought much about the caps.
    Perhaps just like now many people try to fit in with the fashions of the day .
    I'm not up on the men's fashions of the 1900-1910 period so I took a quick search and noticed some discussion about how these caps were often made from scraps of material taken from other worn out clothes part way down this page.
    1910s Men's Working Class Clothing
    No doubt they were easier to have made at home than some other styles probably most often by the women of the family at the time .
    We take a lot for granted now being able to buy inexpensive clothing off the shelf and throw it out after a short time like so many other modern things.
    Jim
    P.S. I see Larry was posting while I was still typing.

  15. Likes Tom A liked this post
  16. #12
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canandaigua, NY, USA
    Posts
    3,440
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    181
    Likes (Received)
    1777

    Default

    Cool oiler with the twist cover. Never seen that.

  17. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    14,091
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    827
    Likes (Received)
    4820

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Hoffman View Post
    Cool oiler with the twist cover. Never seen that.
    Hardinge Cataract headstocks made from 1903 to 1930 had those rotating oil covers. I don't know who made them, but Gits is the usual suspect. Here are pictures of a Cataract 59 headstock showing the oil covers and a box of NOS Hardinge oil covers.

    The little threaded ball-type oil covers were used on some Hardinge slide rests and tailstocks.

    The fourth picture is my drawer of larger twist type oil covers that were not used on Hardinge machines. The ones with the saw slit in the knurling have torsion springs to keep them closed. I think the largest ones are 1/4 pipe thread.

    Larry

    dsc02927.jpg dsc02928.jpg dsc02926.jpg dsc02929.jpg

  18. Likes Jim Christie liked this post
  19. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    Sea Cliff, NY & Portland, OR USA
    Posts
    858
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    189
    Likes (Received)
    108

    Default

    My Seneca Falls Star lathe has similar oilers on the headstock. Quite likely Larry is correct--an early version of covered oiler made by Gits or a competing company.

    Tom B.

  20. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    peekskill, NY
    Posts
    27,571
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    6474

    Default

    Look close at the other clothes the men are wearing. It's fall or winter, they're mostly wearing two or three layers. There's no heat in that shop and the hats are there to help stave off the cold while you're standing at a machine for an entire shift. This is a common feature of those older shops. No heat, limited sanitary facilities - this is why the wood toolboxes have a mirror in the lid, not to comb your hair but rather to help get a chip out of your eye in a hurry.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •