Truck Chassis Becomes a Machine Tool?
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    Default Truck Chassis Becomes a Machine Tool?

    I saw this on the local auction website.

    My guess is truck chassis + blacksmiths drill + electric motor = a good example of what guys used to do when they had junk lying around, were clever and had no money or alternatives available e.g. war time or depression.

    I like the way the chassis taper is included. Cross member and front chassis horns too.

    "Champion Blower & Forge Co, Lancaster, PA" is my guess at the full name.

    champion-blower-forge-07.jpg champion-blower-forge-05-edit.jpg champion-blower-forge-06.jpg champion-blower-forge-09-edit.jpg champion-blower-forge-10.jpg

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    The straight then shallow angle sure shouts old Ford (I mean really old like Model AA if indeed truck)

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    Popular Mechanics magazine put out a book, I think in the ‘30s on how to make machine and woodworking tools from scrap, old car parts and pipe fittings. Of course today the value of the antique car parts would far out cost buying comparable tools. It is a fun read. I think Lindsay might have republished it?

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    The ingenuity of country people is boundless.

    This was once an Austin A40 car/automobile; it was adapted to power the woolpress in an Australian shearing shed;



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    jd-langport.jpg

    I can't offer anything machinery-related, but here's a local footbridge over a ditch. Invert chassis, fill with cement, scratch crazy paving pattern, leave trip hazards intact to discourage cyclists.

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    Rescued a Pfeil plain lathe whose countershaft arrangement is a piece of black plate with a couple of early motor conn rods welded to it for the shaft to run in the little end bushes! I guess it must have been a garage lathe at some time(instead of the more usual small Drummond) And the nut repairs (in the absence of another machine to do them on) for the compound rest are something else!

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    The straight then shallow angle sure shouts old Ford (I mean really old like Model AA if indeed truck)
    John,

    I am not sure about it being truck either, just the cross member seems much more substantial than say a Ford. Maybe more like a Packard?

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    I called it a hand drill, but I see it is a Post Drill, two speed. I found a few that were not hand-driven either.

    There are a lot of upright post drills on the Vintage Machinery website, here is one that looks similar. I thought the rack might have been a modification, but this model has one too.

    Photo Index - Champion Blower & Forge Co. - two speed gears post drill no. 200 1/2 | VintageMachinery.org

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter S View Post
    John,

    I am not sure about it being truck either, just the cross member seems much more substantial than say a Ford. Maybe more like a Packard?
    don't tell John Oder someone cut up one of his beloved Packards

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    don't tell John Oder someone cut up one of his beloved Packards
    Hey... don't poke at John... after all, the most, and the best Rolls-Royce engines ever built, were by Packard...


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