Unknown lathe on local CL for sale.
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  1. #1
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    Default Unknown lathe on local CL for sale.


  2. #2
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    Its a W F & John Barnes!!! No foot powered parts.

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  4. #3
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    This would be a Barnes No. 5

    Barnes made various lathes in differing applications/sizes. A No. 3 exists which is a woodworking treadle lathe, a 4 exists which is (usually) a treadle metalworking lathe that won't cut threads, a No. 4-1/2 exists which is similar to a No. 5 but smaller and does cut thread, and the No. 5 you see here which will cut thread.

    IIRC, there is a larger No. 5-1/2 and a No. 6 which later morphed into a No. 13.

    Of all the lathes the No. 4-1/2 is probably the most seen. A farmer or non-grid user, selecting a lathe would rule out the non thread-cutting No. 4 quickly for that reason (hence they're rarely seen) and would select a 4-1/2 over a 5 because of a basic 2x difference in price. So I would estimate for each two 4-1/2s you see you'll see but one No. 5.

    There is only a slight difference in their utility. Weight is different about 2 to 1 in favor of the 5.

    Any of the Barnes lathes could be ordered from your local freight office on Monday and would arrive at said freight office disassembled in three wooden boxes by Wednesday morning. Barnes was proud of their service (much as Amazon is today) and this is part of why Barnes lathes are still found in chicken coops nationwide.

    (Joke there - Barnes lathe users tended to be non-industrial, off-grid, and relatively self-sufficient. Barnes lathes are really not much different than any small/medium size lathe for that day and age.)

    The Barnes No. 5 does have a modern downside in that original centers, arbors, and holes in tailstock and spindle are Jarno No. 5 taper. ALMOST unobtainium these days. Many No. 5s have been expanded to Morse Taper No. 2 and it is possible to use the lathe to modify modern unhardened centers and arbors to make them fit Jarno.

    Another downside is the 13 loose change gears normally supplied with this lathe for screw cutting are 14-1/2 PA but are 14 Diametral Pitch - which, unless you know someone who cuts gears are also unobtanium pretty much. By contrast Barnes 4-1/2 gears are 16DP which are available at exorbitant price from Boston Gear and others. Gears for Barnes lathes are frequently seen on Ebay, can be bought cheap, particularly if the seller does not know what he has. Clues confirming a Barnes origin are the diameter/tooth count of the gears, the narrow tooth width, and specific diameter of the hole. Patterns of the gears themselves varies with some gears solid, some with 5, 6 or 8 spokes. There may be Atlas, Myford, or other gears which can be modified to fit the Barnes arbors. Also it is possible to use something other than 14DP gears, providing the ratio is correct, the holes fit the gear arbors, the banjo can be adjusted to bring them together.

    The largest gear used on the No. 5 is the gear used on the lead screw for ordinary non-threading feed which has 104 teeth. This gear is frequently seen broken as it tends to be the first part of the lathe to hit the floor when "pushing" the lathe across an uneven concrete floor, and the legs catch and momentum energy breaks the two leg mounting bolts - SO DON'T DO THAT. If you're missing the 104 gear you may EVENTUALLY see one on Ebay. I've seen one in 20 years of looking.

    Anyway, No. 5 in a nut-shell.

    Too bad not including flywheel, pedals, seat, or agricultural chain. On that basis I might consider this lathe a little overpriced ($400 is more like it) but he does comment on a full set of gears, milling attachment, plug & play condition.

    The treadle parts are reproduced but the cost to "retro" an existing lathe usually exceeds simply buying a complete original lathe.

    But it is nice when they can be brought back to original pedal. Sort of sets them apart.

    And its not only about the money.

    Joe in NH

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  6. #4
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    And its not only about the money.
    Thanks for the write up.


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