Very old, very unusual design drillpress
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  1. #1
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    Default Very old, very unusual design drillpress

    Hi.

    Joe and I have had a little talk about a drill press in this thread :

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-lathe-254859/

    Now that I have some more info I thought I would start my own.

    I wrote an email to the museum where I saw the drill, and the director of was so kind
    to answer, with both photos and the story of it.

    The museum got in 1990, from a banker, called N.A. C. Jensen, who himself got it in 1930, from a company called Paasch & Larsen, Petersen. They later turned to into a company called Pasilac.
    They do not have any further history on it, but have a suspicion, that it was shopmade, maybe as an final exam for an apprentice.

    Enjoy the photos, I haven't seen anything like it before.

    (When the handle is used, the balls rotate, creating a centrifugal force, forcing the spindle downwards, acting like a automatic feed.
    Works like a charm, I used it 20 years ago, on a visit to the museum)

    Best regards
    Søren

    Photos and story courtesy of Danmarks Industrimuseum, Ole Puggaard



    Last edited by slnielsen; 11-06-2012 at 01:00 AM. Reason: Way of working explained.

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by slnielsen View Post
    Hi.

    Joe E and I have had a little talk about a drill press in this thread :

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-lathe-254859/
    Enjoy the photos, I haven't seen anything like it before.
    Nice pix. I have and no I haven't seen anything like this on this side of the pond.

    I see EXACTLY how it works. The perfect tool for the two handed drill person. One of the failings of most of these is that feed must be somehow "controlled" by a ratchet or a gear feed. This does away with that necessity.

    Besides that it also makes the drill contact the work IMMEDIATELY while with a ratchet or gear feed, one has to wait for the drill to come down and contact the surface of the work - unless one hurries it along somehow.

    I might say now that it looks like something of DESIGN and not COBBLED. It's too finely finished and thought out. Like something you would see in a turn of the 20th century catalog.

    Very nice. Thank you for going to the extra step to bring this to us.

    Joe in NH

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    Looks like a good way to get teeth knocked out!

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    Must be why the paint on the balls are gone on the outside?

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    Quote Originally Posted by slnielsen View Post
    Must be why the paint on the balls are gone on the outside?
    I think the missing paint is from bashing the operator on the noggin (or anything else within range)! It seems to me that the faster you spin the drill, the more feed force it would provide, varied by the position of the balls relative to the pivot points. (When they are at the equator they apply no downward force on the spindle, and when at the bottom of their travel they would apply much more.

    The variations of centrifugal force and angles and fulcrums and velocity are at this point in time beyond my mental capacity as I have had a couple of drinks and need to go hit the sack.

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    Looks like elements of a Goodell Pratt drill are present. Maybe someone more expert than I in antique hand tools could identify it and tell us if it is shop-made or an unusual production model.

    Tom B.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riderusty View Post
    Looks like elements of a Goodell Pratt drill are present. Maybe someone more expert than I in antique hand tools could identify it and tell us if it is shop-made or an unusual production model.

    Tom B.
    For me the casting looks to good to be a one off as well. It would be very fascinating if the maker could be found.

    Søren

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    Here is a similar fly ball drill discussed:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...illing-115283/

    I though I saw another one time, it might have been the above post. Or it could be a Goodell Pratt.
    I have an older Goodell Pratt catalog and did not see one - so .... I dont know.

    Here is a pic of my common Goodell Pratt drill
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails goodallpratt_no9.jpg  
    Last edited by peter; 11-06-2012 at 06:07 AM. Reason: add missing photo

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    For Christmas my father gave me a Lindsay Book republication of a 1919 collection of essays from American Machinist, reminiscences of an old-time machinist. One discussed an enterprising apprentice who constructed a hand-operated drill of similar design but didn't use it much beyond the demonstration.

    But I wonder if the design would work better if a flywheel & additional reduction from the handle were present? Otoh perhaps its fine for smaller drills in wood...

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    I looked at Goodell-Pratt drill patents. If the flyball feed was in production in the USA, I would expect it was patented.

    Fred E. Farley patented a different self feeding version of the drill in 1910, the G-P model 490: Patent US973489 - PEED E - Google Patents

    The main casting of the Denmark drill, the "common" Goodell-Pratt drill and the Farley patent drawing look pretty much alike. Farley and perhaps others at G-P must have spent some time trying to improve their drill. The fact that the Denmark drill works and has neat castings to suppport the fly balls suggests that the whole drill was made by G-P. The rarity suggests it was expensive and unpopular.

    The cast upright G-P bench drills are shown in the G-P catalog 16 on pages 204 to 207. No fly ball feed, though. http://www.roseantiquetools.com/site...prattno.16.pdf

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by JoeE. View Post
    Looks like a good way to get teeth knocked out!
    Maybe that's the machine they used to start cocky apprentices on?

  18. #12
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    I have written to the Museum in Basingstoke, to hear if they can shed a light on this little mystery.
    Cross your fingers, that I get a positive reply.

    Søren

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    Question

    Søren

    will this drill machine work with left twist drill bits?

    j

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    Quote Originally Posted by JHOLLAND1 View Post
    Søren

    will this drill machine work with left twist drill bits?

    j
    I don't see no reason it shouldn't.
    As I remember it, it forced the spindle downwards no matter what way you turned.
    Been 20 years, so could be a bit rusty.

    Søren

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    Here is the answer from the English Museum. A bit disappointing.

    "Dear Mr Nielsen

    Thank you for your enquiry about the drill you saw at Milestones Museum.

    I'm afraid that all I can tell you is that it is a centrifuge assisted drill, part of a collection of objects from the Gas Board about 15 years ago. Apparently the drill was thought to be unsafe to use and was forbidden. There doesn't seem to be a maker's mark on the drill or other clues to date it.

    I haven't been able to take better photographs than those on your webite because the drill is firmly locked into its existing display.

    Your sincerely

    Oonagh Palmer "

    That didn't help a lot..
    Anyone got any other ideas?


    Søren

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    Only problem with the feed system is that it indeed works exactly backwards to what would be ideal. You want heavy feed and low speed for large drills, high speed and light feed for small ones. As mentioned, faster you crank, the higher the feed rate.

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  24. #17
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    Found some more in England.
    One in France, with at different design, but same ball system.

    Hand Operated Pillar Drills : Hand Tools - UKworkshop.co.uk


    Best regards
    Søren

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    Fascinating stuff Soren

    Always surprises me why manufacturers don't identify their tools. It's something I've always admired about the best US tool makers - they seem to take enough pride in their work to make it with their name and address.

    Bill

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    You have a point there Bill.
    Looking at some of the old stuff from the US, with the ornaments and nice logos, makes me smile.
    Pride was bigger then.

    Søren

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    That drillpress must be the result of alcohol abuse.
    Small drills need high RPM and little downfeed force.
    Big drills need low RPM and more downfeed force.

    How do you achieve that with this "prilldress"? Prilldress, because it works the wrong way round.

    I hope, that the weights slammed a million times against the constructor's head.


    Nick


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