Very Rare 1816 Vernier Caliper is now in my collection! - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 63
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    1854

    Default

    I have still been working on this but it has been a little harder to find new information..... after sending enquiries to a number of museums in Denmark searching for other instruments by or owned by Plotz we have not found any to date.... the search goes on. Here is a little more about him..... I'll have to follow these links when I have time and see where they lead....

    Thank you for your inquiry for information on measuring instruments made by Hans Henrik Plötz (1747-1830). Your question was directed to The Danish Music Museum (a department within The National Museum of Denmark). The Danish Music Museum holds no instruments by Plötz in its collections.

    Plötz was a maker of precision measuring instruments as well as a fine musician and painter. We know for a fact that he was involved in the development of the Danish piano industry, probably from around 1813 at which point he became acquainted with one of the pioneers of the Danish piano, Andreas Marschall. Therefore, it is likely that some of the Marschall square pianos in our collections have Plötz's finger-prints. Marschall was active as a piano maker in Copenhagen ca. 1813-1842. Plötz's work on iron entering the piano is not fully documented but it is most likely that he was the brain behind an iron compensation frame which on the other hand was never patented by Marschall. Plötz died in 1830 but Marschall's iron experiments continued during the 1830'ies.

    We also know that Plötz in the period 1768-1771 was in the employment of The Royal Orchestra in Copenhagen. He was a skilled flutist and violinist. His musical talents combined with his technical skills makes it probable that he had a great influence on Marschall's experiments. After some years abroad, Plötz came back to Denmark and in 1810 was appointed 'Hof-Mekanikus' ('court mechanic'). We know from The Royal Orchestra's accounts that Plötz was engaged at least until 1825.

    All this leads me to suggestions for further searching:

    Department of Modern Danish History (within The National Museum of Denmark): [email protected]
    The Royal Danish Theatre (Library and Archives, research librarian Niels Peder Jørgensen): [email protected]
    Designmuseum Danmark [Museum of arts and crafts]: [email protected]
    Danmarks Tekniske Museum (National Museum of Science and Technology): [email protected]

    I hope that you will find the information useful and remain yours sincerely

    Marie Martens
    Forskningsbibliotekar/Research Librarian

    NATIONALMUSEET/THE NATIONAL MUSEUM OF DENMARK
    Forsknings- & Formidlingsafdelingen/Research & Exhibitions
    Musikmuseet/The Danish Music Museum

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    7
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    I engrave my name on tools I own to keep them from going astray when working away from home. The person who put his name on them might well have worked in a machine shop and had them in his toolbox at his job.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    1854

    Default

    I just spent some more time in chase of the owner/maker of the caliper.......

    First off, the younger Plotz.... I still think this might have a grandson..... I have a lead on church the family went to that might have some old records..... here is what we had on him, his first address was the grey building shown in the earlier photo....

    His full name was Hugo Heinrich Edwin Plötz.
    1880 lived he in Kopenhagen, Vesterbrogade 51, 2 floor left. his age ca. 48, unmarried,his occupation: mekanikus.
    1885 lived he in Kopenhagen, Naboløs 6, 2 floor, his age ca. 50, unmarried, occupation: mekaniker, born in Sweden.
    1890 lived same address, his age ca. 54, unmarried, occupation: mekaniker, born i Stockholm.

    Here is his place on Naboløs 6....



    This is right around the corner from the shop I found the caliper in... shop is on the left side of the street.



    Then I went in search of the address we had for the older Plotz's workshop..... " 1810 he set up his workshop in the courtyard St. Annæ 10". Now how much of this dates to the his time is not known, the building do look like they were given a face lift in the late 19th c. and there was a plaque nearby dated 1875. My guess is that the basic shape of the courtyard was similar during Plotz's time.

    Here is the front of the building...



    And here is inside the courtyard.....





    Looking back towards the front entrance....



    Standing in the doorway you can see the colonnade at the end of the block, that is the entrance to Amalienborg....... this still is and was in Plotz's time the home of the King and Queen.



    The Colonnade BTW is made of WOOD..... yes it is 200 and some years old and I'm sure get better care than my wood house. The strange thing is I have ridden through it many of times and I always thought it was stone. After reading the other night that it was wood I had to see for myself..... even standing next to it it looked stone except for the few odd board seams showing.... it even felt like stone, that is texture.... because it had a lot of sand mixed in the paint however it was not cold to the touch like stone.



    And here is the Queens Palace....... looks like someone was home because of the flags..... the funny part is back in the days when Royalty had sometimes thousands of craftsman living and working for them in close proximity....... now days think of the cost of this real estate? does anyone have a workshop across from the White House or the Louvre? Think what Plotz's shop would be worth today..... I can assure you there is nothing cheap in the neighborhood. Another funny thing is the security, yes there are guards with big bearskin hats and fancy uniforms (I understand the accouterments on their uniforms date to the 18th c. and are still in use) and real modern guns. All this said anyone can walk right up to the front door or look in the windows..... sure is different than the White House where you can't even touch the fence a 100 yards away.


  4. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Newton,MA
    Posts
    19
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Great post ! Very cool pics. Thanks for sharing them.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Viborg, Denmark, Europe
    Posts
    853
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    839
    Likes (Received)
    508

    Default

    Thanks for the update. Nice to know some more about Plötz.

    We do have a more relaxed security perception here, than many other places.
    On a trip to Mexico, I saw armed guards at the entrance to Woolworths!
    Unthinkable here! Here in Denmark a policeman has to file a report, and defend him self if shooting just one bullet.

    Hope you all have a nice New Years Eve!

    Best regards
    Søren

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ms USA
    Posts
    17
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    4

    Default Darkening brass and bronze for aged look

    I'm new to the forum, so please forgive the time delay from your initial post. Your caliper is [for old-tool people] the find of a lifetime. I really enjoyed your post and presentation.
    My family owned a retail art gallery in La Jolla, Ca, for a while in the 1970s-1980s, and my mother had a technique that worked wonders to darken or even blacken antique brass/ bronze items. These items are the kind of objects that would lose big value if the original patina was cleaned off for repairs, for example.
    For brass items in the size were talking about here, she'd prepare a flower pot with potting soil and enough fertilizer to make to soil alkali in nature. She'd bury the object deep in the soil, and water it bi-weekly with fresh-brewed black TEA [no actual plant in the pot].
    In 3- 4 months the item would look 60 years old and have a durable natural-looking patina.
    Her items were mostly investment cast brass; for machined items of harder metal, I'd expect a slower conversion process.
    For bronze items, the process was slower still, but the results were spectacular & worth the wait.
    Perhaps you could experiment with bits of scrap to perfect the recipe...
    Offered sincerely, Ed Hopson

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Stratham, Cow Hampshire
    Posts
    4,178
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    393
    Likes (Received)
    1546

    Default

    yeah know
    if you mount that on a nice oak board
    you could probly get a few bucks on e-bay for that thing
    Actually it would be worthless on an oak board.

    You'd have to paint it "Ebay blue." Then it would be worth THOUSANDS.

    Isn't that how it works?

    Joe

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    1854

    Default

    More updates.... the only other example of this tool I know of was the one in Nessi book. I tried to contact him for better photos. Now how would I know how to find him? I think this is fun.... on my first trip to Paris many years ago I found a little shop on the rue St. Paul with lots of early keys, tools and other metal goodies in the window... I went back a few times and it was always closed so I walked across the narrow street and asked at the Hotel 7th Art.... which was a funky little place with a American movie theme decorating the bar... best of all they spoke English! They said the shop was open sort of hit or miss... so the next time in Paris I stayed there with a room that's window faced the shop..... I got IN!.... anyway as years went by I stayed there a number of times... it is in one of the last of the old areas of the city.... one morning I was woken by the sounds of a knife and scissor sharpener calling out for business as he pushed his cart up the street..... charming!!!! Anyway the last time I was in Paris and walked into the shop the owner said you just missed Luigi Nessi, the famous tool collector..... seems he had a apartment in the neighborhood and frequented the shop often. Anyway I sent a letter to the shop care of him and found out he had passed away.... but just earlier that week I heard from a collector here on the PM that his collection was being auctioned in Zurich ( I posted about that)... anyway I tried to own this set but it was just not meant to be...... with expenses it would have been about $ 1800..... a little steep as I was saving for a later lot that went much higher.... which was also not meant to be. Anyway in the process I was able to get better photos.....

    Based on the original translation of the text from Bergeron we read he did not claim to make the caliper but it was shown to him by a third party, we also see by the Nessi example that they do not appear to made by or engraved by the same hand. The Nessi example is set in a drawing set that based on the number I have and have seen appears to be about 2nd quarter 19th century and French. So based on everything we know so far it appears are Danish instrument maker may in fact be the originator of this form of tool........ he was working on this sort of thing around 1810, he had a need to compute the different scales, he worked with people of each of these cultures, his examples appears earlier in construction to the other. Also one other thing when I wondered around Copenhagen's museums asking about him most curators knew who I was talking about but for some strange reason very little of his work survives so the search goes on. What I can say is this has given me an emense amount of enjoyment.... who would have thought how much fun buying a little tool while out riding a bike could be.






  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    1854

    Default

    Since earlier in this thread we were discussing Bergeron I thought I would put this piece of information here. One question I have always had was when did Bergeron start in business? The date most often given is the date of their first book... 1792.... however there was no way they could produce a book like that in the first years of business, they had to have been established. And now we know they were.... they started in 1784...... here is the proof, which came from German ebay off a tip here in another thread months ago. These are bill heads from Jules Marechal...... they were the successors to Le Fournier et J Marechal who succeeded Hamelin who was Bergeron's son in law. The new address is just a few blocks from where they were on the Isle de la Cite.... if you look at the map in post # 20 the line that runs from 1 to 7 o'clock, they would be just a few blocks north of the river........ anyway one more question answered and as always still looking for information....






  10. Likes slnielsen liked this post
  11. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    1854

    Default

    And now we have even earlier information on the business often referred to as Bergeron, it seems it goes back to at least 1719 to Louis Henry Malbeste! Here are two trade cards in the Waddeson collection along with their descriptions. The card by Hamelin I have seen glued to the front of a Bergeron lathe!!!! At the time I had a film camera and the photos didn't come out.... so here is a clear image.








  12. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Vermont
    Posts
    36
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    34
    Likes (Received)
    7

    Default

    rivett608
    Try this to age your brass.....1. Pour 1 cup of warm vinegar into a plastic bowl. Add 1 tbsp. salt to the vinegar and stir thoroughly with a plastic spoon until salt is dissolved.

    2. Place the brass in the bowl and soak it in the vinegar mixture for about 5-10 minutes.

    3. Remove the brass from the bowl and pat the metal dry with paper towels.

    4. Place the brass on a dark, non-stick cookie sheet and bake it at 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Watch the brass browning or "aging" as it heats. Remove the brass from the oven when it reaches the desired tint and allow the metal to cool completely.

  13. #52
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    williamsburg va
    Posts
    7,882
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    839
    Likes (Received)
    1742

    Default

    Rivett,another great find you have made!! I use heat and or gun blue(Oxpho Blue) to age brass and iron. It is also effective to place the brass item in some black powder and touch it off,followed by discrete rubbing off. These processes give different effects,depending upon what you're trying to duplicate. Generally,I avoid the black powder approach as it tends to keep on corroding as time goes on. Also,try Plumb Brown gun solution for varied effects. A lot of experimenting goes into coming up with realistic aging of these materials. Sometimesd I spend nearly add much time aging things as I do making them.

    The bobbin/flyer assembly in the rear is a reproduction I made of the one in front. Aging brass is much less difficult than getting the worn in microscopic layers of soot and oil on ivory. A very thin layer of evenly applied soot is frequently found on ivory,especially,after hundreds of years in wood or coal heated houses. Getting the boxwood axle of the bobbin was the trickiest thing to get right. The effects of many years of sunlight on boxwood yield a darkened but transparent color that is quite difficult to duplicate with stains,which just stain everything darker,and you cannot make out the underlying grain as easily as there sun darkened original.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dsc_0075.jpg  

  14. Likes old-biker-uk liked this post
  15. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    48
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4
    Likes (Received)
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rivett608 View Post


    I didn't notice in the thread that you had the rest of the French translated. Each of the scales deals with a different standard.

    The top picture says
    Pied du Rhin: Rhine Foot.
    Pied de Londres: London Foot

    The second one
    Metre: Meter
    Pied de Paris: Paris Foot
    Last edited by rowbare; 01-15-2013 at 01:25 PM. Reason: Formatting

  16. #54
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    1854

    Default

    This is interesting..... it came from a French site similar to the PM. I do not know how accurate it is but assume it may make some sense as to the name of the shop, "The English Fleet"

    here is google's translation and the French below....

    some info for those interested in the history of the brand
    Here a thesis on the history of the church of France appoints bergeron family in this tumultuous time

    Two doctoral theses University, supported in June 1967,
    attract attention to the religious history of France under the ancien regime and
    the Revolution.

    Madame de La Croix de la Valette, Mercers, bourgeois of Paris.
    Bergeron Family "A Fleet of England" (1752-1804).
    Through memories and family papers,
    the author outlines the economic and religious history of his ancestors,
    drapers shop into "A Fleet of England", in Paris, rue de la Barillerie
    facing the Sainte Chapelle - Rescue which also participate the family after
    Terror - the parish of Saint Bartholomew, which was not included in the list of
    Constitutional churches. It is therefore, as outlined in the president of the jury,
    Reinhard, a work centered on both an individual and Mrs. Bergeron family.
    Like his two assistants, MM. Leulliot and Ganiage, the Rapporteur expresses its regret
    see this thesis suffer from a lack of historical method and discipline literature.
    This is mainly Mr. Ganiage which releases the importance of chapters devoted to worship underground in Paris on Terror.
    Ms. Bergeron, wife of head, full of poise and charm, had, since 1791,
    turned his home into hiding for refractory priests in the guise of a factory that employed eighteen workers.
    Among them, the famous names unsworn clergy of Paris: the abbots of Lalande,
    Male-pooh and Etienne de Sambucy Carmelite priest who will be until 1804. Cache, "Fleet of England"
    quickly became the cult underground chapel and the author tells us precisely the subterfuges employed
    to celebrate Mass on Sundays and certain major holidays. Finally, the third function of the "Fleet of England"
    Bergeron holds a correspondence center with prisons before being imprisoned herself from 3 to 12 Thermidor Year II.
    Its pseudo-workers are worried about their brand, but escaped the gallows because, it seems,
    the complicity of a clerk Clerk of Fouquier friend of Bergeron. This is one of the many assumptions
    the author tends to turn into certainties, as it criticizes the jury. Finally Bergeron will in turn led
    Port-Libre, for its workshops in making "a machine to drill the grains of light guns."
    What was this mysterious machine? The jury had a lengthy discussion with the author but failed to make the thing clear.
    Honorable Mention is awarded after a long and animated viva.

    quelques infos pour les intéréssés de l histoire de la marque
    voici une thèse sur l histoire de l'église de france qui nomme la famille bergeron en cette époque tumultueuse

    Deux thèses de doctorat d'Université, soutenues en juin 1967,
    retiennent l'attention pour l'histoire religieuse de la France sous l'Ancien régime et
    la Révolution.

    Mme de La Croix de la Valette, Merciers, bourgeois de Paris.
    La famille Bergeron « A la Flotte d'Angleterre » (1752-1804).
    A travers des souvenirs et papiers de famille,
    l'auteur esquisse l'histoire économique et religieuse de ses ancêtres,
    merciers tenant boutique « A la Flotte d'Angleterre », à Paris, rue de la Barillerie,
    face à la Sainte Chapelle — au sauvetage de laquelle participera d'ailleurs la famille après
    la Terreur — sur la paroisse Saint- Barthélémy qui n'était pas comprise dans la liste des
    églises constitutionnelles. C'est donc, comme le souligne le président de jury,
    M. Reinhard, un travail centré à la fois sur une personne, Madame Bergeron et sur une famille.
    Comme ses deux assesseurs, MM. Leulliot et Ganiage, le rapporteur exprime son regret
    de voir cette thèse souffrir d'un manque de méthode historique et de discipline bibliographique.
    C'est principalement M. Ganiage qui dégage l'importance des chapitres consacrés au culte clandestin à Paris sur la Terreur.
    Madame Bergeron, femme de tête, pleine de sang-froid et de charme, avait, dès 1791,
    converti sa maison en cachette pour les prêtres réfractaires sous couvert d'une fabrique qui employait dix-huit ouvriers.
    Parmi ceux-ci, des noms célèbres du clergé insermenté de Paris : les abbés de Lalande,
    Male- baste et Etienne de Sambuçy qui sera curé des Carmes jusqu'en 1804. De cachette, « la Flotte d'Angleterre »
    devient rapidement chapelle du culte clandestin et l'auteur nous renseigne avec précision sur les subterfuges employés
    pour célébrer la messe le dimanche et à certaines grandes fêtes. Enfin, troisième fonction de la « Flotte d'Angleterre »,
    Mme Bergeron organise un centre de correspondance avec les prisons avant d'y être elle-même incarcérée du 3 au 12 thermidor an II.
    Ses pseudo-ouvriers sont à leur tout inquiétés, mais échappent à l'échafaud grâce, semble-t-il,
    à la complicité d'un commis- greffier de Fouquier-Tinville, ami des Bergeron. C'est là une des nombreuses hypothèses que
    l'auteur aurait tendance à muer en certitudes, comme le lui reproche le jury. Finalement Mme Bergeron sera à son tour tirée
    de Port- Libre, pour fabriquer dans ses ateliers « une machine à percer les grains de lumière des canons ».
    Qu'était-cette mystérieuse machine ? Le jury en discute longuement avec l'auteur sans parvenir à tirer la chose au clair.
    La mention honorable est décernée après une soutenance longue et animée.

    From Tour " A la Flotte d'Angleterre " - Page 2

    Thank you fthi

  17. Likes Billtodd liked this post
  18. #55
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Portsmouth, England
    Posts
    881
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    291
    Likes (Received)
    551

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rivett608 View Post
    Bergeron holds a correspondence center with prisons before being imprisoned herself from 3 to 12 Thermidor Year II.
    This date is from the French revolutionary calendar, which didn't catch on. Year 2 started on 22 Sep 1793, with twelve months of thirty days (and a bunch of festivals to make up the numbers) of which Thermidor was the 11th month, so this would have been in about August 1794.

    Decimal clocks were introduced at the same time, each day containing ten hours of a hundred minutes of a hundred seconds, and weeks of ten days. The old ways were resumed about ten years later.

    George

  19. Likes Billtodd liked this post
  20. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Colchester UK (where the lathes used to be made)
    Posts
    1,918
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1319
    Likes (Received)
    556

    Default

    Intriguing stuff -

    Was the company importing & exporting more than just tools an materials from England?

    Will the 'Scarlet Pimpernel' be making an appearance?

    Bill

  21. #57
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,427
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    210
    Likes (Received)
    1854

    Default

    I don't know the answers to all these questions, I do know Bergeron offered all the items in their book for sale which included tools for both men and women (needlework stands, spinning wheels, etc). My late friend Ted had some of those decimal clocks and watches.... I also have a friend who has a 400º protractor....

    In the early 19th century Peter Stubs (or his son) went on a trip to Paris calling on tools dealers, he stopped at Bergeron's and included their trade card in his scrap book........ it's a shame I don't have better photos but these were taken 30+ years ago.....





    The card appears to say...

    At the Fleet from England

    Hamelin Bergeron

    In Paris, street of the Braillerie

    Shop of tools for Art's and Crafts

    Publisher of "The Manuel of Turning" ????, ????

  22. #58
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Portsmouth, England
    Posts
    881
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    291
    Likes (Received)
    551

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rivett608 View Post
    I also have a friend who has a 400º protractor....
    Possibly not so rare - the 'grad' on scientific calculators - and the Microsoft Windows calculator - is 1/400 of a circle. I presume it is still in use somewhere.

    George

  23. #59
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    L'Orignal, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,057
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1641
    Likes (Received)
    821

    Default

    Rivett,
    Thanks for continuing to keep us posted in this thread.
    I was curious as how the name Flotte D’Angleterre came about .
    I did a little searching to see what I could find so I did some searching on Google .
    Maybe you will have seen most of this before somewhere but I thought I would share some of the places I had looked incase you might turn up some more clues from them for this or other research
    One of Flottte D’Angleterre’s neighbors

    “Cette boutique du centre de Paris, située à deux pas de la Flotte d'Angleterre, à toujours travaillé dans la distribution d'outils. elle vendit des rabots pendant près d'un siècles et demi, mais n'en fabriqua pendant la deuxième moitié du XIXe siècle.”

    “située à deux pas de la Flotte d'Angleterre” Loosely translated = situated a couple of steps from the Flotte D’Angleterre

    www.mot.be | 00000436

    www.mot.be | Bibliography

    www.mot.be | Directory

    www.mot.be | Cat1850-1874

    An account in french about the neighborhood around La Flotte D’Angleterre.
    Les anciennes maisons de Paris - Charles Lefeuve - Google Books

    Paris : Hare, Augustus J. C. (Augustus John Cuthbert), 1834-1903 : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive
    Reference to Rue de la Barillerie here
    Paris


    <\/title><\/head><body background="'+Picture+'"><\/body><\/html>') hw.resizeBy(tmpImage.width-hw.document.body.clientWidth,tmpImage.height-hw.document.body.clientHeight) } else { var PictureLink="Picture.csp?Profile=Default&OpacLangu age=fre&Picture="

    You might get some help from someone here .
    Résultats de la recherche - Paris Révolutionnaire
    http://www.parisrevolutionnaire.com/spip.php?page=plan

    Manuel de Tournage 2and eddition in French by P. Hamelin - Bergeron
    Manuel du tourneur - Louis-Georges-Isaac Salivet - Google Books
    Again loosely translated
    Starting here they mention that with the coming of a peaceful period that the artisans can still obtain their lathes , tools and other supplies from their store and to ensure that the artists can buy with confidence they have maintained the workshops established by L.E. Bergeron where all relative parts are made with precision and elegance.

    Manuel du tourneur - Louis-Georges-Isaac Salivet - Google Books

    Page 249 is the start of a chapter on Iron Turning .

    Manuel du tourneur - Louis-Georges-Isaac Salivet - Google Books

    It looks like the book is also on archive.org so it will be easier for me to read.
    Manuel du tourneur : Bergeron, L.-E., 1737-1805 : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive



    I can’t view much in these Google links on my system.

    A la Flotte d'Angleterre », à Paris, rue de la Barillerie, - Google Search
    Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics, 55/56: Absconding - Page 260

    books.google.ca/books?isbn=087365854X
    Francesco Pellizzi - 2010 - Preview
    ... by Pierre Hamelin-Bergeron, who claimed to be Bergeron's son-in-law and successor as proprietor of a tool shop “A la flotte d'Angleterre” on the rue de la Barillerie, from 1807 to 1824.36 A trade card in the collection of Waddesdon Manor reveals him to have kept a ... ovale, à guillocher, quarré, à portraits & autres, tout ce que l'art a produit de plus ingénieux & de plus agréable, 2 vols. (Paris, 1792). 35.


    en ...
    Journal encyclopédique - Volume 73

    books.google.ca/books?id=2WA7AQAAIAAJ
    Pierre Rousseau - 1792 - Snippet view - More editions
    A Paris , chez Bergeron, à la Flotte tt Angleterre , rue de la Barillerie ,. vis- à-vis la giille du Palais.. 179*. P A R M I les arts méchaniques propres à occuper agréablement le loisir des amateurs , celui du tourneur occupe a juste titre la première ...
    Rue de la Barillerie,Paris - Google Search

    I had a discussion with a friend of mine who was born in France and he speculated that the name La Flotte D’Angleterre may have been used used by the store to infer that their tools were of high quality as the English Fleet was highly respected at the time and perhaps that they were supplying some tools to the British .
    This reminded me of the Bombay &Co, name that we have here in Canada that really has very little to do with Bombay in India but none the less the store is known for the reproduction wooden furniture and it sells as I found out when I looked it up.
    Bombay & Co, Inc.*::*About Us.
    Perhaps putting a little spin into advertising is not as new as we might sometimes think.
    Regards,
    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Christie; 01-26-2013 at 08:59 AM.

  24. #60
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Cairns, Qld, Australia
    Posts
    2,791
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    879
    Likes (Received)
    752

    Default

    Gradians are a metric measure of angle and I think also used for artillery/gunnery too.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •