Video of Millers Falls saw
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  1. #1
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    I made a short video showing the little hack saw I just bought operating and showing the auto stop. The saw has cast into it "M. F. Co., Millers Falls, Mass".

    saw operating




    Irby

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    Me again! Look what I found on this saw:
    Star power hack saw

    Irby

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    Irby:

    Do you also have the " Pratt " auger handle ?

    Jim C.

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    Jim:

    Nope, didn't get one of those with the saw. And a good thing, too - I don't have enough hands to use one!

    Irby

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    That video is the only time I have ever seen another one of these operating. My saw was bought brand new by my great grandfather I believe. The connecting rod on mine is wood. Perhaps the original iron one broke, and Grampy fashioned up a Mahogany one. These are neat old machines, and while they are slow, they beat sawing by hand. In the pics we are shortening up some fireplace andirons. I noticed that your counterweight is in the forward position. The one in the catalog photo and mine are both behind the pivot point. Interesting.









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    Wow, Troy, an original with all the pieces! Thanks for posting those pictures. The connecting rod on mine is wood, too. I have an old treadle singer sewing machine stand and the connecting rod on it is wood too, so I bet they just made the conn rods from wood for some reason back then.

    The position of the weight only matters on how much force you want to exert on the blade. Mine is probably where it worked best with the dull blade it has.

    I found some patents on this saw and noticed a few items missing from mine - and I see them all on yours. That's great! Now with a little help from you, I can make those pieces just like the originals. I'll e-mail you with my questions, if you don't mind. I can also see where those neat little wingnuts all go. Cool!

    Irby

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    Irby, I'd be happy to help out. Let me know if you need some detailed pics or measurements. The saw is in my fathers basement near Boston, but he has a digital camera, and is capable of measuring up anything you might need.

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    Hello,
    You guys are going to force me to re-prioritize my saw re-building and make me dig my MF saw out and start working on it!!!

    Nice looking saws you guys have! I'm hoping to make mine look that good one of these days! The biggest problem I have is my vise is broke and I'm going to have to recast the piece. Other than that I think it's all there!

    Thanks!
    Richard

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    hi irby .....i have the same saw in the garage ...ben using it since early 60's when i sent my wife to a pattern maker shop auction ... ....cut a lot of rebar w/ it when we were building homes around 1985....it has a sump for coolant added, & drive dogs have been built up w/ braze several times.....still cranking away driven by 2 v belts on the large flat pulley ,from a motor under .thru a pillow block jack shaft reducer ...mounted on a wooden under shelf by some older tymer than i....last patent date is 1888 ( if remembered )
    best wishes,
    docn8as

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    I beleive that I have a Pratt auger. Or at least a copy of one. I'll post a pic if I can dig it up.

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    whooos.....last date is 1893
    best wishes
    docn8as

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    I just picked up a Miller's Falls saw similar to Irby's and Carter Marcy's. It appears generally complete but I haven't spent much time really getting into it yet. For starters, I'm wondering what the large handle attached to the sliding plate (the one with the patent info on it) are for. Once I get into it, some additional photos of either machine if either of you is willing.

    Tom B.

    On edit, I just ran Irby's video of the saw operating ant it appears to be the auto shut-off--am I correct?

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    Tom B,


    Yes, that handle starts and stops the saw. It's pushed to the OFF position by the plate to stop the saw when the blade carrier drops through the work and hits the plate. Look over the dog clutch arrangement he pulley - it's sort of neat.

    Irby

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    Irby, thanks. There is one broken casting that I believe is part of the shut-off mechanism. I'll be taking some pix soon and will no doubt have more questions.

    The dog clutch is interesting but the drive pulley has been replaced with a 10" V-groove pulley. I'll be retro-fitting with a more correct flat belt unit. What is the diameter of yours?

    Tom B.

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    Default I gots me...

    ...one of those Millers Falls saws too. Mine had an "aftermarket" replacement connecting rod made from a piece of 3/8th rod and a couple of "blocks" of steel all welded together in "field expedient" mode. I'm aimed at replacing it with a turned wooden rod with the center turned portion done in 19th century style.

    This is the saw which I described in an earlier post as having been repaired (straightened) in the factory by brazing the overarm. In disassembly for rebuilding I was surprised to find it "off square" and in rework/repair, found a previous attempt at repair underneath all the paint and apparently done in the factory.

    Mine doesn't have a counterweight but it does have lettering on the crankdisk with "40 Rev per Minute" indicated. Some read 40 and some I've seen read "45."

    There is also an arrow indicating direction of motion on my crankdisk indicating rotation "counterclockwise" as you look at it. There may be those that are "opposite handed." Irregardless of the arrow direction the blade should be put in place such that action of the crank holds the blade to the cut and lifts it (more or less) for the return.

    The AutoStop on these saws seems to differ also. Mine "knocks off" the clutch in the center of the drive pulley when the saw frame descends to the bottom of the cut-line. A wooden handled lever allows a start. Others of different design have a slider that is pushed by the saw frame as it nears the bottom of travel.

    Someone with plenty of time should do a "type study" of these saws. As a light/medium duty power hacksaw they're quite handy - extremely 19th century - and made in New England which is a source near and dear to my industrial heart.

    Great-great grandfather would have approved.

    Best,
    Joe in NH

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    Tom B,

    The pulley diameter is 13.6" and it's 2-3/8" wide. I got the diameter by measuring the circumference since that was easier. It's crowned, too.

    I have some pictures of the saw here:
    http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/m...20Falls%20saw/
    ...including the dog clutch on the lever and the pulley. The dog clutch has 1/8" travel.

    Irby

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    FYI, I also found the three patents listed on the slider plate of my saw.

    No. 502996, dated Aug. 8, 1893 -
    http://www.google.com/patents?id=Xd1FAAAAEBAJ&dq=502996

    No. 466929, dated Jan. 12, 1892 -
    http://www.google.com/patents?id=h1NoAAAAEBAJ&dq=466929

    No. 502978, dated Aug. 8, 1893 -
    http://www.google.com/patents?id=S91FAAAAEBAJ&dq=502978

    Irby

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    Irby and Joe in NH, thanks for your input. Here's a pic of my saw--note the replacement V-groove sheave which I will replace. Also, in the second photo, please note the broken casting--any input on its function and corrrect unbroken shape? A photo of this piece would be great.




    Thanks,
    Tom B.

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    The broken piece you refer to seems to be a "blade guide" which is described in the bottomost googlepatent reference provided by Irby. (No. 502978)

    I can't provide you a photo of mine since my saw doesn't seem to have one - and never did. In fact, my Millers Falls saw differs materially from either of yours in that it doesn't have the knock off "slider" (with the patent numbers), doesn't have the Patent No. 502978 guide above, doesn't have the adjustable weight or the rod or standoff, and knock off is done by virtue of a pin on the over-arm hitting the lever arm with the wooden handle as it descends beyond the bottom of the cut. Simpler, for sure, but somewhat less elegant.

    And less doo-dads to play with. [:^(]

    Otherwise the action of the pulley/dog/clutch/notch arrangement is the same, the castings are all the same (including the 5 spoke pulley) and it's heritage is certain.

    Can anyone (W. Carter Marcy?) provide a scan of the catalog page? For each of the machines in my shop, I try to get a period catalog cut, mat & frame it, and hang it on the shop wall behind the machine. "Got the real thing in front of you yet you still rather get off on the pornography," my wife says.

    She's a woman. How can she possibly know that?

    Best,
    Joe in NH

  20. #20
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    Tom,

    I put a picture and dimensions here of the end of the blade guide that's broken on your saw.
    http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/m...=DSC02882a.jpg

    Mine is missing the internal parts. But you can see them in the pictures of W. Carter Marcy's saw, and in patent no. 502978. I put a copy of the figures in patent no. 502978 here.
    http://s100.photobucket.com/albums/m...78_figures.jpg

    I also just noticed that I'm using a much wider blade than will fit through the .91" bore. This saw was designed for a narrower blade, but the wider one works just fine.

    Irby


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