...Video...No CNC for these Cranks...
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    3,281
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2277
    Likes (Received)
    4201

    Default ...Video...No CNC for these Cranks...

    ...full manual machine shop manufacture of crankshafts in Pakistan...

    ...from raw castings to crated and on the "truck"...

    ...click link below...

    Production of Crankshafts in Factory Complete Process || Machining 3 Cylinder Engine Crankshaft - YouTube

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kansas City, Mo.
    Posts
    6,672
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    407
    Likes (Received)
    2271

    Default

    I saw that video, you just made me watch it to end, Thanks. Amazing! like looking back in time except it is color and the guys are wearing flip flops. What I wonder is how many hours labor for each crank and how much money do the get for each? Are these all sold to a manufacture for new engines or they aftermarket replacement parts?

    How lucky we all have it!

  3. Likes lathefan liked this post
  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22,566
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I saw this last week on another forum.
    Did you see the "drill chuck" at 16:44 ?

  5. Likes lathefan liked this post
  6. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    3,018
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2842
    Likes (Received)
    1437

    Default

    There's a lot of precise work that can be done with very simple fixtures and guides. A lot of those same operations would be relegated to 4 and 5 axis CNC machines in the name of saving a minute or two of run time. Of course there's a big difference in 10 guys making 50 pieces in an 8 hour day and 1 guy making a piece an hour, non stop 24/7.

  7. Likes lathefan liked this post
  8. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    214
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    137
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    Got to respect the skill of the machinist building these, i do believe the vidio left out some of the manufacture like straightening of the crank several time during machining ops, bad enough grinding one that has been repaired by welding as stress is released the crank bends. No checks for flaws or bad castings but they are cheap to buy. Their rough centering indicators are ideal though, if you crash it just bend it back ...Video...No CNC for these Cranks...


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. Likes lathefan liked this post
  10. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    tonawanda new york
    Posts
    299
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    68
    Likes (Received)
    146

    Default

    I watched this video and immediately afterward kissed my CNC machines and my flag.

  11. Likes PegroProX440, mike8 liked this post
  12. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    105
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    70
    Likes (Received)
    13

    Default

    health and safety would love this.there are more vids with those blokes and it shows what people can really do.

  13. Likes lathefan liked this post
  14. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Interior British Columbia
    Posts
    2,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    328
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    Looks like a scene out of a Bull Of the Woods cartoon, except cleaner, and better lit!

    LULZ! at the guy at 23:30, who has obviously figured out that a bedsheet may be comfortable, but with enough sparks, it's worth wearing some gear!

  15. Likes lathefan liked this post
  16. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Shandaken, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,673
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1536
    Likes (Received)
    8027

    Default

    I had watched this youtube a few days previous to it being posted here. I noticed that the machine tools used were an interesting mix. One lathe is a geared head, and may be of English manufacture. The other lathes are of the same 'vee belt' headstock design as the Yogi lathe discussed in another thread on this 'board. The vee belt headstock lathes are likely locally manufactured. A Cincinnati horizontal milling machine is used to mill the keyways in the crankshafts. Another oddity was the use of small 3-jaw lathe chucks on the drill presses.

    The crankshafts are likely being made as replacements for diesel engines in tractors. Could be a replacement for the crankshaft in a number of tractor engines. Massey-Ferguson tractors are prevailent in Pakistan and India, maybe produced under license. There are Mahindra (Indian made) tractors and a number of other manufacturers which we, in the USA, probably never heard of.

    Watching youtubes of rural life in India and Pakistan, it is more common than not to see trucks and tractors grossly overloaded. Mechanics carry out repairs any way they can, often working with improvised tools on the bare ground. It is rare to see a torque wrench in use, and even ratchet wrenches seem to be in short supply. I am sure the crankshafts made in this youtube are going into tractor engines which will be run hard, not maintained remotely per manufacturers' recommendations, and run under overload quite often. Little wonder that shop was producing large numbers of replacement crankshafts.

    Gasoline engines in automobiles and light equipment often use nodular cast iron crankshafts. I was surprised to see the crankshafts in this youtube were some kind of cast iron as well. This was obvious not only from the appearance of the raw castings, but the chips when the castings were machined. From what I have seen of Indian and Pakistani foundries, getting a consistent grade of nodular iron for crankshafts might be something of a grab-bag. Many of the foundries use coke-fired cupola furnaces, and some use induction furnaces to melt the iron. Youtubes of the foundries show a kind of laid-back way of doing things, with no precise weighing out of what gets charged into a melt. Scrap such as sprues and gates from previous runs of castings, along with scrap in the form of busted up junk castings and scrap steel, along with some 'pigs' (probably excess iron from previous melts) make up the charges. Maybe the foundries pouring diesel engine crankshafts are more exacting in their control of what goes into a melt.

    The crankshafts are being made by manual machining, using micrometers and vernier calipers. Given the type of machine tools used and the type of measuring instruments used, the accuracy of the crankshafts produced likely is nowhere near what crankshafts produced by the diesel engine OEM would be. The metallurgy of the castings and the degree of accuracy of the machining raise a few questions. Namely: how well do these crankshafts hold up in service ? Chances are, like so much of what I've seen on youtubes about Indian and Pakistani mechanics and locally made machinery, the crankshafts and bearing inserts are setup so clearances are on the looser end of things to start with. Like so much else in that part of the world, the people work with what they have and know. Running an engine hard and with minimal maintenance is common. Changing crankshafts with a shorter service life is an expectable part of operating tractors in India or Pakistan. The main thing is the people find ways to make what they need and keep their machinery and equipment running.

  17. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    1,206
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    999
    Likes (Received)
    404

    Default

    As Joe M. said Massey Ferguson tractors are popular there. They still make new tranny gears for 1960's MF tractors there. The three cylinder crankshaft is for probably for a 152 Perkins diesel, also used in the Massey Ferguson tractors.

    I recently needed transmission parts for my 1960's MF tractor and had to order from India. Also popular there.
    No U.S. source for some of those parts.

  18. Likes lathefan liked this post
  19. #11
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Interior British Columbia
    Posts
    2,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    328
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mllud22 View Post
    As Joe M. said Massey Ferguson tractors are popular there. They still make new tranny gears for 1960's MF tractors there. The three cylinder crankshaft is for probably for a 152 Perkins diesel, also used in the Massey Ferguson tractors.

    I recently needed transmission parts for my 1960's MF tractor and had to order from India. Also popular there.
    No U.S. source for some of those parts.
    Yeah, I have a FE-35 Diesel Deluxe from 1958, that predates the Massey Ferguson buying of Perkins, mine has a 4 cylinder Standard Engine Co. Diesel, and I have found out that they are still making pretty much the same 1950's tractors over there, so parts are available! Yay.

    Stuff like rebuild kits, or complete new parts, are pretty available, and not too expensive., Mainly though, you can still get a lot of the replacement body parts that you just couldn't consider, if you were stuck dealing with the current iteration of MF.

    Nice! At 39:45, they are crating them up and both Belarus and MF-240 markings are visible on the crates! Dunno if they are the same crank, but...

  20. Likes mllud22, lathefan liked this post
  21. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD, USA
    Posts
    4,390
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    513
    Likes (Received)
    804

    Default

    Seems like a happy shop in general, apparently some cross-training also. I wonder what turnover and promotion looks like there- must be quite a few competing shops.

  22. Likes lathefan liked this post
  23. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    10,906
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    644
    Likes (Received)
    8755

    Default

    An awful lot of very good crankshafts made in the USA before these things called cncs came about.

  24. Likes lathefan, digger doug, Herb in Delco liked this post
  25. #14
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Interior British Columbia
    Posts
    2,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    328
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    An awful lot of very good crankshafts made in the USA before these things called cncs came about.
    Seems to me, most of the machining has to be 'close enough', while the final grind to dimension needs to be pretty much 'bang on!'

    I won't suggest that the tolerances at the end, are within the capability of a guy with a wooden ruler, but a lot of the machining ops may well have been.

  26. Likes JST, lathefan liked this post
  27. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    19,555
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2478
    Likes (Received)
    3746

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    Seems to me, most of the machining has to be 'close enough', while the final grind to dimension needs to be pretty much 'bang on!'

    I won't suggest that the tolerances at the end, are within the capability of a guy with a wooden ruler, but a lot of the machining ops may well have been.
    Many of the measurements were done with calipers, in the roughing work. I saw at least one instance where a guy used a metal scale to check something.

    Once it got to the grinder, I saw mics and indicators.

  28. Likes lathefan liked this post
  29. #16
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    3,281
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2277
    Likes (Received)
    4201

    Default

    ...notice at 40:45...crate says "EXPORT QUALITY MATERIAL"...

  30. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22,566
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    Seems to me, most of the machining has to be 'close enough', while the final grind to dimension needs to be pretty much 'bang on!'

    I won't suggest that the tolerances at the end, are within the capability of a guy with a wooden ruler, but a lot of the machining ops may well have been.
    The crank grinder is using a swing down Arnold gage....at 35:09

  31. Likes Ray Behner, lathefan liked this post
  32. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    the Netherlands
    Posts
    243
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    41

    Default

    The lathe tools looked either hss or carbide tipped and not indexabele. This reminded me of a job I did in Egypt some time ago. A german engineer needed the use of a lathe for the repair of a high pressure pump we were using. After showing my driver a picture of a lathe we were taken to a local shop where, after some negotiating, we were allowed to use the lathe. It was Bulgarian and probably made in the 50’s somewhere. Its regular machinist had never seen the indexable tool the engineer brought with him, but gladly accepted it as payment for the use of the lathe.

  33. Likes lathefan liked this post
  34. #19
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    1,480
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    545
    Likes (Received)
    1281

    Default

    Reminds me of Night Shift pumping out cast iron parts on a #5 W&S. Covered in black dust inside and out.

    Amazing work.

    Make Chips Boys

    Ron

  35. Likes lathefan liked this post
  36. #20
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Interior British Columbia
    Posts
    2,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    328
    Likes (Received)
    945

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    The crank grinder is using a swing down Arnold gage....at 35:09
    Saw the gage being used, did not know it's name. That was the swing down long shank indicator he used to check his final dimension, I think. No?

    That grinder looked an awful lot like the one that I stood and watched do my crank in a shop in Moose Jaw a few (dozen) years back.

    I think a lot of guys forget that there is a lot out there that does not actually need micron tolerances to work well.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •