Vintage Stanley Bench Grinder Number 677 - disassembly
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Texas
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default Vintage Stanley Bench Grinder Number 677 - disassembly

    I just acquired this machine (I think it's a #677 grinder) from an estate sale for $50. I started to disassemble the grinder and ran into a problem right off. I can't figure out how to remove the inside washer from the shaft.
    Does anybody have experience working on this type of grinder?

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    Jon

    img_1505.jpgimg_1506.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,342
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1153
    Likes (Received)
    493

    Default

    You can always take it to a 2nd or 3rd floor window and chuck it, always works for me.

    Re-assembly is a bit tricky tho.



    In all seriousness I have no clue but good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    417
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    170
    Likes (Received)
    166

    Default

    Hard to tell what I'm looking at. Is that the inboard washer for clamping the wheel? If it's just stuck on the shaft you might try a few taps with a dead-blow hammer or a claw puller. Looks like the threads stop short of it which is different from most modern grinders. I'm guessing it might be press-fit onto there against a shoulder. Might need a puller in that case.

  4. Likes Jim Christie liked this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    L'Orignal, Ontario Canada
    Posts
    2,376
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2534
    Likes (Received)
    1032

    Default

    I would agree that the flange may have been pressed on .
    I would remove the guard if the bore in it is larger than the flange and then use a puller to carefully remove the flange .
    On a similar grinder of a different brand that I have I had to pull the flanges with a puller .
    After taking the motor apart I was able to press the grinding wheel flanges back on and then put the assembled motor without the base between centers in the lathe and faced both flanges so that they ran true without any wobble.
    If you don't have a large enough lathe you can true up the flanges in other ways when the motor is running with a file or another tool slide and take very light cuts .
    You may get lucky and the flanges will press back on and run perfectly true .
    You can true the grinding wheels with a dresser to run true even if there is a little wobble in the flanges afterwards.
    Jim

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Shandaken, NY, USA
    Posts
    4,647
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1518
    Likes (Received)
    7940

    Default

    My thinking is the flanges were pressed onto the arbor. The simple logic of 'how did they put it together in the first place with those flanges on the arbor' along with the practicalities of hogging a relatively small diameter arbor from a large diameter blank weigh in favor of the flanges being pressed on. At the Stanley Works, I am sure they had a hydraulic press and fixtures to press the flanges onto the arbors and seat them against a shoulder. I've had experience with disassembling press fit machine parts. Rather than rely entirely on brute force, which often is a bit more than was required to press the parts together, I'd suggest 'giving things a little help'. Apply heat to the flanges with a small torch flame. Something like a very small brazing tip on an oxyacetylene torch, or a 'Mapp' torch will work. Rotate the arbor as you apply the heat to the flanges, keeping the torch flame well back from the arbor. This will expand the flange slightly. You can keep a puller setup on the arbor and flange, maintaining a strain on the puller screw. As you add heat, takeup on the puller screw. After you have a good hard strain on the puller screw and have gotten the flange hot, it should break loose. Another old mechanic's trick, when this sort of setup does not break things loose, is to give the head of the puller screw a solid blow with a steel hammer. Not a love tap, but a real blow with a steel hammer having some weight to it will often cause things like this to break loose- often with a good, rewarding 'bang' when it happens.

    Jim Christie's post reminds me of the old time saw mill arbors. The collars (or flanges) against which the saw blade was clamped, were heated and shrunk onto the arbors, seated against a shoulder. After the arbor was setup in its bearings, some saw filers or saw mill operators would true and 'cone' the face of the collar or flange in place. This was done using an old lathe compound slide clamped onto anything handy. Some sawmills, running large circular saws ('round saws') would require that the faces of the flanges on the arbor be faced at a slight angle. This put a 'cone' onto the sawblade when it was at rest. At speed, the circular saw would 'flatten out'.

    For the OP's grinder, I am sure if care is taken, the flanges will seat squarely against the shoulders on the arbor/motor shaft. Cleaning up the mating surfaces with a fine oilstone to remove burrs once things are apart is a good idea. Heating the flanges (the kitchen oven works well for this if you can get away with it) will expand them so they may be reassembled on the arbor with a light driving rather than a pressing. A piece of steel pipe, ends faced square, will make a good tool for either driving or pressing the flanges back onto the arbor when reassembly time rolls around (sorry about that pun- could not resist it).

    BTW: the coefficient of expansion of steel is 0.0000056 inches/inch degree F. (I carry this around in my head as I am an old time engineer, more like a dinosaur).
    If the arbor is 5/8" diameter, a 0.625" diameter bore heated a total of 300 degrees F will expand 0.00105". 0.001" may not sound like much expansion, but on a small diameter bore with a press fit, it can make life a whole lot easier.

    I take the view that a press fit results in a forced stretching of the metal in the female part. When I design or make up parts to go together with interference fits, I prefer to use shrink fits. On existing work, such as getting a large shaft coupling hub off a shaft 'out in the field', a bit of heat with a torch makes the job a lot easier. Press fits, in my experience, often require more force to break apart than was required to assemble the parts.

  7. Likes 3512B, Jim Christie liked this post
  8. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Madera county california usa
    Posts
    2,724
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    720

    Default

    The arbor is its own press.

    Simply slide on and add enough washers to allow the nut to press into place.

    For removal a little heat along with a puller.

    You may need to build a cup or other method of attachment to grab the flange.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Reddington, N.J., U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,656
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    687
    Likes (Received)
    450

    Default

    Can you fit a bearing separator behind the washer? If you don't own one, most of the auto parts chains have a loan-a-tool service.

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    728
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    649
    Likes (Received)
    153

    Default

    about 25 years ago i got one that was the same thing sold under the kc brand . the guards and rest were trash [bad design ]. any way at school there was a set of baldor guards with covers but no rest that the instructor let me have . to adapted the guards to the grinder i made some sleeve that i drilled and tap the face to mach the bolt pattern of the baldor guards and drilled and taped the outside of the sleeve for three Allen set screws to hold the assy to the grinder . i made the tool rest from channel iron . the reason i put the remains on the guard sleeve were the org rest went . is if you take the guard assy off and run a wire wheel or buffer wheel with out that collar on there debris will or can get in the bearing . have never needed them but you never know . oh and about your washer the one on mine just came off . one last thing the one i have is 220 volt single phase only



    001.jpg002.jpg
    Last edited by 1yesca; 05-16-2021 at 09:49 PM.

  11. Likes Jim Christie liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •