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  1. #121
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    A bit of a follow up. As I work through the power side of the lathe, I'm quickly realizing I'll have very little REAL knowledge on how fast the lathe is spinning at any given moment. This is due to the power being provided via a VFD to a 220v 3 phase 2 HP motor and a few custom bits to get the power from the motor to the head stock. (Pullies, brackets, etc.) So, rather than guess, I plan on putting a magnet on the spindle with a hall effect sensor. The only place I can come up with is a small exposed area between the collet closer and the head stock. The sensor will be mounted on the back of gear case, I think.
    These kits are cheap and easy to install, power, and display. While I am NOT fond of the combination of digital and antique, I am less fond of guessing RPM's. If time and money were no object, I have the same type of sensor feeding a contemporary circuit that drives a recreation of the Wade Tachometer. MAYBE this will come to fruition with the addition of a Digital to Analog converter in the form of an Arduino or Raspberry PI board.


    Here's where I'm thinking.




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    Way wiper progress. With the cleanliness of the brass way wiper retainers, I just had to find the felt I was going to use. Therefore, I turned to McMaster-Carr and ended up getting the following. Cheaper alternatives could have been used, I'm sure, but this SHOULD be enough to last me QUITE a while.





    I'll be using Tublacain's method of cutting felt. Hopefully not too much goes to waste. I don't have a leather punch but in Weatherford Tx, I'm betting I can get one pretty easily. Or, use any number of methods to punch a hole. (I have some smaller hole punches.)

    Additionally, I picked up a later model Wade 8a tail stock wiper. Therefore, I'll be drilling and tapping some holes in the tailstock to accommodate that wiper. From the looks of the tail stock ways, it'll be a much needed improvement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren McCarley View Post
    I don't have a leather punch but in Weatherford Tx, I'm betting I can get one pretty easily. Or, use any number of methods to punch a hole. (I have some smaller hole punches.)
    Research "paper drill". Not hard to make one or two. You don't have a lot of depth.

    Delivers really nice holes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Research "paper drill". Not hard to make one or two. You don't have a lot of depth.

    Delivers really nice holes.
    Great idea and sounds like a fun little project! Thanks! Now where's that scrap brake line i had laying around?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren McCarley View Post
    Great idea and sounds like a fun little project! Thanks! Now where's that scrap brake line i had laying around?
    LOL! Nah.. when I said "not a lot of depth" it was a hint you could rapidly "create" a thinwall projection but a 1/4" or so deep out of a slug of larger - and far easier to GRASP - scrap material. That fit a drillpress chuck.

    I once made one out of a scrapped FIAT 124 intake valve to get a clean hole in "Metalphoto" on a gadget my Day Job built exactly ONE of .. for COMSAT Labs!

    The valve stem fit the DP chuck. The poppet-valve head provided enough material for the larger diameter I needed. Stock tubing in a DP vise was the anvil" for a punch. The drillpress was the only "lathe" I had when powered, became an arbor press when NOT powered.

    One hole. Cosmetic, more than functional. But it was so visible, it just had to "look right".

    So it did.

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  7. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    LOL! Nah.. when I said "not a lot of depth" it was a hint you could rapidly "create" a thinwall projection but a 1/4" or so deep out of a slug of larger - and far easier to GRASP - scrap material. That fit a drillpress chuck.

    I once made one out of a scrapped FIAT 124 intake valve to get a clean hole in "Metalphoto" on a gadget my Day Job built exactly ONE of .. for COMSAT Labs!

    The valve stem fit the DP chuck. The poppet-valve head provided enough material for the larger diameter I needed. Stock tubing in a DP vise was the anvil" for a punch. The drillpress was the only "lathe" I had when powered, became an arbor press when NOT powered.

    One hole. Cosmetic, more than functional. But it was so visible, it just had to "look right".

    So it did.
    Will be in the shop on Friday. I think this is a great idea. These holes are so dang small.... I'm wondering if a "paper drill" is even needed. Perhaps a punch would work... or MAYBE even just facing off a piece of 1/16" rod and hardening it a bit, then use a hammer and soft wood/plastic as a "cutting board" and punching the felt.... Worth experimenting anyway.

  8. #127
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    I actually have a paper drill at my shop in Azle.

    But last time I made way wipers I used a piece of sharpened tubing to make the screw holes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex TX View Post
    I actually have a paper drill at my shop in Azle.

    But last time I made way wipers I used a piece of sharpened tubing to make the screw holes.
    Yup. Sharpended tubing is a "poor boy fewsies" hollow punch that works "LIKE" a paper drill!

    The basic is that they give the waste material a place to go so the edge can be very thin for not having as much stress on it NOR as much stress on the material.

    Print shop background here, too. "Real" paper drills work a Helluva lot longer and harder of course. Deeper, too!


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    Common in chemistry lab work are cork borers, which is a fancy name for a sharpened piece of tube. You can buy sets of them if you want.
    Cork Borer Set, Set of 12 Sizes - 4-18mm - German Pattern - Brass, Nickel Plated Finish - Eisco Labs: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

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    Quote Originally Posted by sandiapaul View Post
    Common in chemistry lab work are cork borers, which is a fancy name for a sharpened piece of tube. You can buy sets of them if you want.
    Cork Borer Set, Set of 12 Sizes - 4-18mm - German Pattern - Brass, Nickel Plated Finish - Eisco Labs: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific
    Oy!

    A tool I don't already have! In Nickel-plated BRASS, even!

    Mmmmm.. maybe I should buy a vintage silver cross ...to ward of the tool-whore packrat Demon - instead?


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  13. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Oy!

    A tool I don't already have! In Nickel-plated BRASS, even!

    Mmmmm.. maybe I should buy a vintage silver cross ...to ward of the tool-whore packrat Demon - instead?

    This! Lol. Too many tools, not nearly enough boxes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren McCarley View Post
    This! Lol. Too many tools, not nearly enough boxes.
    Boxes? You mean "time".

    Drawers, cabinets and boxes are CHEATING! Akin to contraceptives aren't they?

    A proper tool-whore is a farmer, too. Sows tools at random, "horizontal storage".

    How else could they ever cross-pollinate, find fertile metallic-ion rich soil in which to establish roots .......so as to grow ever-more-interesting - if downright WEIRD - tools you've never before seen the like of?

    Not as if one had to buy EVERYTHING, is it? Next thing you know, there will be a rule one has to REMEMBER what he bought. Then where he PUT it.

    There'll be a revolution, first!

    Mind ....if there's a single dime to be nade off home-grown and wild-caught tools and shop supplies, Jeff Bezos would soon have "freeze-dried stench of dirty sock" packaged and sold on Amazon, and premium priced for delivery faster than weary feet can sweat!


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    I needed a good laugh. Thanks!

    I was able to get a few things accomplished today.

    Since my Wade's motor and speed controls are LONG gone, I had to procure a new motor. The one below is a 2hp at 1750rpm. The belt will end up being a composite belt and due to the long run, I figured it would need a tensioner. So..... I snagged a serpentine belt tensioner. (Chevy, I think.) Because the tensioner can't levitate, I needed to make a bracket. Because the bracket needed a solid mount, I figured I'd bore a hole in it and bolt it to the front of the motor. Well, the motor face plate needed to be machined down and bolts needed to be made to pull the bracket to the face plate because the stock bolts weren't long enough.

    Motor disassembled (check)
    Face plate machined down for mating to the bracket (check)
    3, 10" long, 5/16" threaded rods to replace the original bolts (check)
    3/8" thick plate steel bracket identified and cut to rough size.. (check)
    Bracket laid out, centered, and bored to mate to motor face plate. (Check)
    Test fitting the bracket, face plate, and bolts, with a mock up of where the tension wheel is going. (Orientation is TBD)

    Slowly, but surely.
    (Click pics for bigger pics.. off site image hosting)











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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren McCarley View Post
    I figured it would need a tensioner. So..... I snagged a serpentine belt tensioner. (Chevy, I think.)
    MOPAR Caravan tensioner is nice. Has a square hole so one can use a scket-wrench ratchet or breaker bar to set the tension range. Spring then works off that benchmark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    MOPAR Caravan tensioner is nice. Has a square hole so one can use a scket-wrench ratchet or breaker bar to set the tension range. Spring then works off that benchmark.
    That sounds like a great solution. If I didn't already have the second hole bored for this tensioner, and the tensioner itself, I'd probably seek out a Caravan tensioner. No pics of the second hole. Will post those up once I have the orientation and tensioner mounted.
    On that note, due to the nose of the motor shaft, I'm going to have to mount the tensioner from the "back" of the bracket so the pulleys will line up on the same plane. Most likely will have to turn down some spacers to off set the tensioner "back".
    This image may help make sense of my description.


    If we consider the bracket the "0 of the X axis", the center of the tensioner pulley would be somewhere around +10dm (dm = made up units of measure) while the center of the drive pulley on the motor would be +5dm. In order to mitigate the difference, I'll mount the tensioner on the -X side of the bracket, measure centers and attempt to obtain pulley centers. From there, the motor mounts will be bolted to 2 C channel brackets on the cabinet frame. The C channels have slots already machined in them allowing me to adjust the motor/bracket assembly relative to the head stock pulley center.
    For those in the know on these lathes, this configuration will force me to semi-permanently select a single head stock pulley. I will be attempting to implement a VFD in the near future allowing me to vary the speed via a potentiometer rather than using the original belt selector. (The belt selector is also LONG gone).

    Hopefully that all makes sense. VFD, wiring, contactors, etc are yet to be procured.

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    Nominal progress was made this weekend on the bracket. Internal keyway was cut on the motor pulley. Unfortunately, I forgot to get pics. However, I'm getting VERY close to needing to power the motor. Years ago, I started a thread talking about this subject. I've updated that thread in the VFD section. Feel free to check it out and leave me your feedback.
    Happy Father's day to you all!!

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    Any day in the shop is a good day! Today was no exception. Slow going since I'm learning but did make some serious progress and things are coming together.

























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    Hope you all had a great 4th of July! After a weekend off I was back at it and made some tensioner off sets out of 3/4" rod. Face, drill 3/8" hole, cut off tool, deburr. The Hardinge lathe made EASY work out of this. Dang that thing is nice!
    Next I reamed out the tensioner holes to .376" on the mill. Now that was an interesting set up. Worked like a champ. Sharp reamers go through aluminum like a hot knife through butter.
    Next up was the mock up, drill corresponding holes in the plate and mount it all up. Fit was spot on
    . Unfortunately I forgot to take a final picture but there will be more. Hopefully next weekend.
    Click the images for bigger pictures.








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    A bit of a set back and some progress.
    After assembling the tensioner I realized a flaw in my plans. Nothing to grab and turn the tensioner and loosen the belt. I couldn't use the pulley bolt so I figured put a simple solution. Drill pin holes, make a spanner and move on.
    Done.














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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren McCarley View Post
    This! Lol. Too many tools, not nearly enough boxes.
    LMAO over that. Acquired (or made) so many tools over the years that I've forgotten about some, occasionally reminded when I find a "relic" while searching for something else.

    PS: a simple punch for soft materials can be made by running a center drill into a piece of drill rod so it creates a chamfered end and then honing off the burrs on the OD. Saves having to push the "slugs" out of a tubular punch.

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