webbing stretcher for use in upholstery (was interesting piece from basement)
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  1. #1
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    Default webbing stretcher for use in upholstery (was interesting piece from basement)

    I mentioned in an earlier post the loss of my grandmother over last weekend. No need for sympathy, after almost 104 years sheíd lived a full life and earned the right to move on.

    Grandma graduated from Cornell University with a masters degree in Home Economics education in 1944. I found a number of pictures of her senior project(?), a sofa, in construction with her working on it. This tool was in a box with other remains of furniture construction and repair materials.


    Her name was Marlie Ann Berry, so Iím sure this was hers. Iím also fairly certain itís something she made by hand and appears to be useful in pulling taught the burlap strips that made up the substrate of furniture in the era. If anyone here knows the proper title for such a device Iíd love to know, otherwise itíll remain grandmas furniture thing.

    In any case, I donít expect to find any great treasures when I return to Ohio this weekend for the funeral and to keep cleaning out the house, but thereís some interesting photographs and such that may find there way to this forum.
    Certainly I wonít find anything more valuable that my uncles baseball card and milk cap collection, he knows itís there, so I canít abscond with it.



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  3. #2
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    1. This forum likes descriptive titles, please read the rules.

    2. What are you posting this for ? Selling ?

    None of this looks like machine tools.

    More like a garage clean out.

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    The tool in question is a webbing stretcher. As you said, it is used for pulling the burlap webbing strips taut before they are tacked in place.
    Rick

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    Default Another interesting piece from grandmas basement.

    The rules stipulate anything related to making... Sorry Doug, was really hoping people in this community would appreciate a WWII era tool, handmade, by a woman. I posted in part to discover if there was a trade name or accepted term for this tool. Pretty sure using the title: ďAssumed furniture tool, maybe for burlap, found in grandmas basementĒ wouldnít have been any better. Itís not for sale, I posted here because itís the one place I can assure both a good knowledge base as well as a general appreciation of history. Iím sorry if Iíve offended you in any way, if the moderator takes issue with the post he is free to remake it: ďDefinitely a burlap stretcher used for furniture, handmade by my grandmotherĒ.

    Additionally, maybe not machine tool related, but a slice of history I hope will fit in here. I donít have a picture of grandma running a turret lathe, or bucking rivets. I will scan the photos of her making furniture and anything else I believe pertinent, in the hopes the community here will appreciate them solely for the history. Again, this is a woman, born in 1915, who not only went to college, but put herself through a masters degree program at Cornell University, a feat that still carries some panache and even more so for a woman in 1942.



    Jeremy

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    Quote Originally Posted by jermfab View Post
    The rules stipulate anything related to making... Sorry Doug, was really hoping people in this community would appreciate a WWII era tool, handmade, by a woman. I posted in part to discover if there was a trade name or accepted term for this tool. Pretty sure using the title: “Assumed furniture tool, maybe for burlap, found in grandmas basement” wouldn’t have been any better. It’s not for sale, I posted here because it’s the one place I can assure both a good knowledge base as well as a general appreciation of history. I’m sorry if I’ve offended you in any way, if the moderator takes issue with the post he is free to remake it: “Definitely a burlap stretcher used for furniture, handmade by my grandmother”.

    Additionally, maybe not machine tool related, but a slice of history I hope will fit in here. I don’t have a picture of grandma running a turret lathe, or bucking rivets. I will scan the photos of her making furniture and anything else I believe pertinent, in the hopes the community here will appreciate them solely for the history. Again, this is a woman, born in 1915, who not only went to college, but put herself through a masters degree program at Cornell University, a feat that still carries some panache and even more so for a woman in 1942.



    Jeremy
    nice of you to stop by and change this sites format

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    Quote Originally Posted by batw View Post
    nice of you to stop by and change this sites format
    Wow, way to go! Give a little respect, and try not to troll someone who just had a loss.
    Of all the things you could do, thatís low.

    much respect to your grandma, and my condolences.

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    Quote Originally Posted by batw View Post
    nice of you to stop by and change this sites format
    I'm going to disregard that reply. My grandparents didn't live that long and it is a tragic thing when they pass. It is in your guts and want to express the grief. My Mom is approaching 90 now and when/if she goes away, it will be sorrow felt to far corners. People go mad with grief sometimes. They can't handle what happened. I don't care if you posted here or anywhere but it isn't hurting anybody. If it relieves your sorrow, it is worth it. I have one of those tools also, but that isn't really what this is about.
    Be well and take heart that others empathize with your situation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jermfab View Post
    The rules stipulate anything related to making... Sorry Doug, was really hoping people in this community would appreciate a WWII era tool, handmade, by a woman. I posted in part to discover if there was a trade name or accepted term for this tool. Pretty sure using the title: “Assumed furniture tool, maybe for burlap, found in grandmas basement” wouldn’t have been any better. It’s not for sale, I posted here because it’s the one place I can assure both a good knowledge base as well as a general appreciation of history. I’m sorry if I’ve offended you in any way, if the moderator takes issue with the post he is free to remake it: “Definitely a burlap stretcher used for furniture, handmade by my grandmother”.

    Additionally, maybe not machine tool related, but a slice of history I hope will fit in here. I don’t have a picture of grandma running a turret lathe, or bucking rivets. I will scan the photos of her making furniture and anything else I believe pertinent, in the hopes the community here will appreciate them solely for the history. Again, this is a woman, born in 1915, who not only went to college, but put herself through a masters degree program at Cornell University, a feat that still carries some panache and even more so for a woman in 1942.



    Jeremy

    Some people are real jerks on this site sometimes but there is a tremendous wealth of knowledge here.

    I personally very much enjoyed and appreciated your post.

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    Generally, the guidelines on this forum would not include this tool though its not too far out. Its use in manufacture of furniture & upholstery is on topic, so I won't close the thread unless it goes off the rails.

    Mod

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    As stated above, it's a webbing stretcher for use in furniture upholstering.

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    Jermfab: An interesting posting. I agree that it is a tool probably used to stretch the fabric in furniture making, although it looks very much like an old tool used by my wife's grandparents in a restaurant for producing chipped ice. This was in the days of block ice and you had to chip ice for cold drinks. I, however am pretty sure that your grandmother didn't make it. The smooth craftmanship in the tool is a bit too slick for a "one off". Thanks for posting.

    JH

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  17. #12
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    I donít suppose weíll ever know, the reason Iím attributing it to her is it has the same finish, and appears to be made from the same wood (poplar?) that most of the furniture she built was. Iím headed back to her house this weekend and Iíll take a couple pictures of furniture I know she built for comparison. Iíll also add the pictures of her and her classmates with their completed furniture project.

    Again, apologies for anyone Iíve upset with my liberal interpretation of the rules and guidelines here. Itís always been my impression that the community here is one of few remaining that values HISTORY, primarily the history of machine tools and fabrication. I realized I was pushing the boundaries, but hoped the historical aspect alone would make this post at home here.


    Jeremy

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  19. #13
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    Definately a webbing stretcher, My wife did furniture upholstering years ago and I have seen these in other shops as well. Maybe someone used one as an icepick but not its intended use. Most likely not hand made either, probably an old osborne like in the link, they have been making these forever.

    C.S Osborne Upholstery Webbing Stretcher - Made In USA | eBay


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