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  1. #1
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    Default webster and bennet

    Hello, been offered this wb 36" I reckon its 1940's
    I dont know if its my imagination but the crossrail looks really worn and scored
    Any response s appreciated

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    Pics always helpimg_0042222.jpgimg_0043333.jpgimg_004.jpg

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    Stupid phone will not allow me to post right way up pics on here

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    .....just a flip away, flip away.
    left-side.jpgfront-view.jpgright-side.jpg

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    Another heavyweight Pressbrake? .....I think we'd better send the gangs out to knock a few more wedges under East Anglia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Another heavyweight Pressbrake? .....I think we'd better send the gangs out to knock a few more wedges under East Anglia.
    I let the cnc boys fight for the 120day pay repetition work, whilst I like the load it with a crane pay me now work!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    Another heavyweight Pressbrake? .....I think we'd better send the gangs out to knock a few more wedges under East Anglia.
    Gonna have to re-calibrate your compass's too with all that iron.

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  12. #8
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    That's an old " D " type. It's got to be older than I am because they were phased out in 1948 in favour of the hydraulically controlled " DH " type. I was phased in a year later. I wouldn't be put off by the age though if the machine is in running order. Typical British bullet proof over engineered design were it was expected to last a man's life time comfortably.

    They are pretty basic machines but very well made and reasonably easy to maintain and repair. Nothing much to go wrong other than the clutches getting tired as long as the lubrication has been looked after. The slideway lubrication was the weak link as you can see.

    Machines like that put the great in " Great Britain ".

    I remember a big job coming off a 48" version of that machine. The levers on the operators side ended up like spaghetti. It took me ages to straighten them all out later.

    Oh and two "t"s in Bennett.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Whats the contraption sticking out behind the feeds?
    I didn't know 'till I bought a book how many options there were on gear ratios, also slower spindle speeds led to heavier bearing arrangement, hollow spindle or just a well?
    Even I find lots of uses for the old W & B

    Richard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    That's an old " D " type. It's got to be older than I am because they were phased out in 1948 in favour of the hydraulically controlled " DH " type. I was phased in a year later. I wouldn't be put off by the age though if the machine is in running order. Typical British bullet proof over engineered design were it was expected to last a man's life time comfortably.

    They are pretty basic machines but very well made and reasonably easy to maintain and repair. Nothing much to go wrong other than the clutches getting tired as long as the lubrication has been looked after. The slideway lubrication was the weak link as you can see.

    Machines like that put the great in " Great Britain ".

    I remember a big job coming off a 48" version of that machine. The levers on the operators side ended up like spaghetti. It took me ages to straighten them all out later.

    Oh and two "t"s in Bennett.

    Regards Tyrone.
    Does that look typical wear for a old one?
    Its cheapish but im not into junk hoarding

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    Does not matter if its typical.

    What matters is it still useable? Or useable enough for the price that you can profit off it until you can fix, or earn enough to replace.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pressbrake1 View Post
    Does that look typical wear for a old one?
    Its cheapish but im not into junk hoarding
    I can't really see much from those photos, I'm only on an iPad.

    What do the handles wind like ? Are the saddle and the ram easy to move ?

    What sort of work do you intend to put on the machine ?

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pressbrake1 View Post
    I let the cnc boys fight for the 120day pay repetition work, whilst I like the load it with a crane pay me now work!
    I can see that, but you know the rules - he who adds the weight makes the wedges

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    Here are a couple of pages from my 1948 book showing W&B's offerings.

    Click three times to get full size.


    w-b-1948-01.jpgw-b-1948-02.jpg
    Last edited by Peter S; 11-02-2017 at 06:57 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter S View Post
    Here are a couple of pages from my 1948 book showing W&B's offerings.


    w-b-1948-01.jpgw-b-1948-02.jpg
    As I understand it 1948 was the year the " DH " style machines came out. It must have been a Great Leap Forward compared with the older " D " type vertical boring machines.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    The railway workshop at Ipswich (Qld) had a most unusual W&B,it was two boring mills side by side on one base.It was one of the last machines there when the museum took over,but I think the railways were keeping it.Never seen or heard of one like it.Incidentally,the Qld railways is all privatized,new owners seem to do zero heavy maintenance,and have closed /scrapped just about everything.

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    I run a 52" DH at work. Great machines. Even with a severely worn cross slide screw it's on the money if you just gouge away until getting serious in the last .060 or so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    I run a 52" DH at work. Great machines. Even with a severely worn cross slide screw it's on the money if you just gouge away until getting serious in the last .060 or so.
    Hi Mike, on the " DH " types a serious design flaw in my opinion was the use of the oil in the main gearbox/base as a lubrication oil for the ways. Because of the hydraulic controls the machine used " Velvus 3 " oil which as you probably know is an hydraulic oil as thin as water. Not suitable as a way oil at all. Most of the older machines had "fired up" ways unfortunately.

    They should have fitted a separate lube pump on the column with a good way oil in it. Nothing to stop anyone retro fitting one though even if it is shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike C. View Post
    I run a 52" DH at work. Great machines. Even with a severely worn cross slide screw it's on the money if you just gouge away until getting serious in the last .060 or so.



    My bold

    I love that description Mike.

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    Be sure to lower the rail before moving it as they are top heavy. Im not sure ( many moons ago when i rebuilt 2 of them) also read the book on how to rotate the table as they have a roll up clutch that will break if you rotate chuck by hand in the wrong direction.


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