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  1. #21
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    Wedding rings are best avoided in the shop.

    Ring Avulsion Injuries - Hand - Orthobullets

    Total deglovement of the fourth digit due to ring avulsion injury | BMJ Case Reports

    Note that in many cases, a long piece of tendon is extracted during the event.

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  3. #22
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    In most larger manufacturing plants rings are not allowed for safety reasons so you have no choice.

    I always wore mine around my little grinders as not much of a concern with getting bit.
    Then one day when unloading the vibe one of the diamonds is missing, oh-poop there goes some money.
    I find that watch pocket in my jeans a perfect spot for it.

    An old friend has one that he can not take off. An electrician at GM and it got hit hard and burned into his finger.
    The hospital decided it best to leave in place at the time. Strange.

    It's one of those one in who knows how many safety odd things with not so much chance but it is there.
    Do you wear a seat belt in a car? Have you ever bought a lottery ticket hoping to win?
    Easy to prevent accident but remember to put it back on before the wife finds it in the washing machine with the question about "you were working a late shift last night?"
    Bob

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  5. #23
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    Do an internet search of degloving injuries and show her the photos if she wants you to wear it. Put it on for special events.
    I wont link to the degloving pictures because they make my skin crawl

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  7. #24
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    Well, this thread got some attention.

    I should add that I am just a hobbyist who occasionally machines. So not wearing it is not an option.

    I think a little ring box for the pocket might be a good project.

  8. #25
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    In line with this thread:

    I wore my wedding band for 22 years of marriage, taking it off when doing shop work. Since I wear a pocket watch and use the watch pocket on my jeans for that, I used to put the wedding band in my desk (if working at the powerplant), or in my machinist chest in the same drawer when working in my own shop. One night in the fall of 2007, I was riding my Harley home after dark from the powerplant. The deer were into the fall rut. Two deer came up out of a field and onto the road I was riding on. I braked the Harley, so probably had slowed it from about 60 to something a good bit less. I missed the first deer clean, but the second deer seemed to hook around and tee-boned the Harley from the left side. I recall seeing the deer's head and neck in an unearthly orange glow from the running light, too damned close to my face.

    Just that quick, the deer was out of sight, and the bike was in a nasty broad-slide. I knew the bike was going to lay down. I also had the sense I'd be OK since I was not tumbling, and knew the bike had stout saddlebags and I was wearing good leather and steelcap work boots. The bike laid down and the bike and I slid on the pavement for a ways. I held myself in the clear, watching the sparks fly as the bike ground on the road surface, and realized the bike was going to follow the crown of the road and likely wedge hard under the guide rail. I let go and began a slide on the pavement, kind of like a guy sliding into home plate. My leathers did their job, and I came to a nice easy stop, stood up, got off the road and jerked the Harley upright from where it was against the guide rail. First car down the road was an unmarked deputy sheriff. He had me take my gloves off and my left ring finger had a good droop to it and I had no control of it. Deputy called for a flatbed for the Harley and the flatbed driver dropped me at home. My wife took one look at my ring finger and saw it was swelling. She got ice, dish soap and olive oil on it and we got my wedding band off.I have not worn my wedding band since. My ring finger got pushed back and wound up shorter, with no visible knuckle, but healed up just fine with full usage otherwise. My ring finger diameter is also a bit larger at the base where what amounted to a "cleft weld" in the bones happened. The wedding band sits where we left it the night of the accident, on a ring-keeper (a brass mouse with a raised tail) on the window sill over the kitchen sink. Having a busted knuckle is kind of a status symbol in come circles, and gets a few laughs, especially when I saw I "got a deer with that hand".

    Interestingly, after my father died, Mom took to wearing his wedding band around her neck on a chain. I noted the wedding band was battered and not round. I asked Mom about it, since I had never seen the wedding band off my father's hand when he was alive. Mom told me the story: During WWII, Dad was riding in the back of a 6 x 6 truck somewhere in Europe. The column of US Army vehicles was suddenly attacked by the Luftwaffe, who came in on a strafing run. Whether the driver was hit, or just started swerving wildly to try to avoid the strafing is unknown. Dad had told me that part of the story, and that he had bailed off the back off the 6 x6, landed hard and wrong and busted up most of his right side, and picked up some shrapnel as well. Dad wound up on 50% veteran's disability and looked like someone welded his right side back together with wide weave cover passes. Mom told me the rest of the story when I saw the battered wedding band. It seemed Dad was trying to get off the truck and grabbed the stake side to steady himself as he worked his way to the rear. His wedding band got hooked on a tarp hook and his feet went out from under him and he was swinging off the back of the truck. Dad had entered the Army on a waiver, having had a torn rotator cuff in his right shoulder from a jobsite accident in about 1935. The Army had repaired the rotator cuff after Dad completed Basic and Combat Engineer training, prior to shipping him over to England. As Mom told the story, Dad knew it was either have his ring finger jerked out by the roots from his hand, lose the wedding band in the process, or heave himself up and unhook his ring finger from the tarp hook. Dad did a one-handed pull up with his right hand/arm, and totally blew out the repair to the rotator cuff and tore up the anchorages for a bunch of tendons but he did free himself. He landed on the road, hard on his right side, and shattered his right ankle to bits along with shrapnel wounds and plenty more injuries. Dad did tell me that part of it. He said he did not realize how bad he was injured, so took his rifle and used it to get to his feet and attempted to get to the side of the road and figure out where to go from there. About that point, a medic came along, took one look at Dad and told him to lay down. Dad said he argued with the medic, and the medic somewhat forcibly got him to lay down and then shot him up with morphine. Dad kept his wedding band, and at some point, attempted to "round it out" and got it to where he could wear it again. It stayed on him until he died.

    I use my father as a role model and inspiration in many ways to this day. Dad used to tell me to "get up and get moving" if I seemed to be dragging my feet over something like a common cold, bruise, sprain, hangover (when I came of age), or similar. Dad also would slog through whatever life dealt out without complaint, and his other advice to me was: "Get in line with everyone else, don't cut the line, pay your dues, keep your nose clean, and you'll come out alright". Now, both my parents are gone. Mom made it to 100, and for 30 years, she wore Pop's wedding band. I do not know which of my siblings got that wedding band. To someone in the jewelry business, it is just so much old gold, nothing special other than weight on the scale as scrap. Inside the wedding band, Pop had scratched with a pin: "Rose and Martin " followed by and arrow pointing to the mathematical symbol for Infinity. Mom told me Pop had scratched that inscription into both their wedding bands- they were married in 1942, and a few days later, Pop was shipped out with his outfit for England.

    After my accident with the deer and my Harley (which was repaired and which I still ride), Mom kidded me about Pop and his wedding band, and said I had gotten off quite a bit easier.

    From the time I was a kid at Brooklyn Technical High School, we were always required to read and prove we understood shop safety rules. One basic rule was "no rings, watches, or other jewelry". It became an instinctive thing to take off my wedding band, and my "engineer's ring" (which I took to wearing on the pinky finger of my right hand after I got my Professional Engineer's license). At the powerplant, we have safety tailgate briefings (after 6 years of "retirement", they brought me back as a mentor to the younger engineers and mechanics). One thing we always stressed was arc flash protection and the dangers of rings and watches around live electrical equipment. We also told the mechanics that getting a hot chip or hot slag between a ring and one's finger is another painful injury to avoid. The result is rings are left in lockers with "street clothes", since the work force now wears flame retardent uniform clothing. Certain things are "no brainers", and with a younger workforce, I am seeing people are more conscientious about safety. Older hands like myself remember the pre-OSHA days, and times when damned near anything could be done on a job or workplace, with many potentially unsafe practices being routine. At least from what I've seen, accidents and injuries are greatly reduced, so there is a lot to be said for taking the extra time to work safe. We know that more accidents and injuries to our workforce happen at their homes, on their own time, than in the workplace. The result is a lot of the tailgate safety briefings deal with seasonal "off site" topics like chainsaw safety, lawnmower and snowblower safety, tractor safety, woodstove/chimney precautions, how to safely use jumper cables, etc.

  9. #26
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    In my opinion, this is one of the best threads i've read yet. I'm a life long shop guy (all hobby, mostly wood, only recently machine tools) married for 30 years and i never take my ring off. So far, the only bad thing to happen is now and then i squeeze it out of round in the wood working vice when doing a glue up. But from now on i will remove it when ever a machine tool spindle is turning.

  10. #27
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    This has been discussed in detail before, a quick search should find the other threads.

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    I had the proverbial HS shop teacher minus a part of his finger. "Give me 4 and a half".

    Tried the small watch pocket in my jeans, lost a $200 engraved Ti ring----probably ended up in a VMC chip auger.

    Nowadays, I keep mine in a German silver and glass 'American Waltham Watch Co." device, meant to show off watch movements. Fits perfect, and nestles down into a regular pocket.

    My routine is I take my ring off when I drink my morning coffee and put on my work boots. When the boots come off, I put the ring back on.

    If you have a woman who questions you about not sporting your ring in any industrial environment, find another woman. Show them jim rozen's links above. Early on, my lady watched me turn down her rotors on a brake lathe and understood perfectly.

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    For 43 years I worked repairing mechanical and electronic equipment. First for IBM card machines and later large mainframe computers with very serious power supplies. Rings and watches were not allowed and off hour call outs were common. My ring stayed in a drawer in the closet all that time. I carried a pocket watch which I liked better than a wrist watch anyway. After retirement I started wearing the ring again. We hope to celebrate 57 years of wedded bliss in a few months.

    Bob
    WB8NQW

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    My ring stays at home in a box. Never wear it. What matters is in your heart, not on your hand. My wife has never had an issue with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank R View Post
    16 months ago I got married; rather late in life. All these years I have not had to worry about wearing a ring while working in the shop; now I do.

    What do you do with your ring while working around machinery? Do you put in your pocket? Hang it on a nail? Have a little box to hold it in?

    This is a serious question, as for all of you that want to leave a cynical comment or negative joke.... please don't.
    Congratulations.

    Quote Originally Posted by 4GSR View Post
    I usually wear mine, but when I do take it off, it either goes on my key ring or hang it on one of the knobs of my Gerstner tool chest.
    I like that idea. Maybe add on of these to your key chain.

    Amazon.com: Nite Ize S-Biner SlideLock Dual Carabiners, Stainless-Steel, Assorted 3-Pack, Sizes 2, 3, 4, Black: Home Improvement

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    The rule where I worked was NO JEWELRY OF ANY KIND. You could lock in in your tool box, put it in your pocket, or leave it home. From time to time the boss made an exception with rings if someone couldn't remove one. In that case the area the finger was wrapped with white medical adhesive tape. Then the ring couldn't get caught on anything, and couldn't be shorted out if the person was a welder. This didn't happen often, and since no one abused the rule there was never any trouble.

    I never wore a ring of any kind. The wife knew why and understood. We've been married nearly 40 years and to this day I don't wear a ring.

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  19. #33
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    When I was an apprentice phone exchange technician, the Federal government owned the monopoly phone company and we were sent off for 2 years of trade school training in some American WW2 vintage plywood and timber prefab buildings in Brisbane. We were shown photos of burns caused by metal watch bands shorted across 50V battery banks, 34 years later I still wear plastic watch bands and no rings at all.

    Crossbar phone exchanges had bare aluminium 50V DC buss bars about 4-6" by half an inch thick with positive and negative only separated by a slab of phenolic sheet: a contract painter put a gallon can of oil based paint down on buss bar terminals and vaporized the can and burnt the building down with the explosion. We were shown 1950's films by British General Electric of tiny outhouse size brick buildings where fuses were test blown all the way up to 6" copper bars which destroyed the building with the arc explosion (Homopolar generator maybe?). We were also shown static electricity safety films of the aftermath of a solid fuel rocket motor where either a missile or satellite booster stage was ignited, I think it killed everyone in the facility.

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  21. #34
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    Around my ten-year wedding anniversary the ring got caught in a factory door handle. No real hurt but got me thinking. So I cut the ring and tin soldered it, to make it weak but still holding together. It stayed that way for another year, then my marriage finally folded.
    Should have done it long before!

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  23. #35
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    22 plus years and I don't know where my ring is. I caught it twice working on a combine during the first two months after the wedding. I have not seen it since. I value my fingers and my wife is ok with that. My grandfather only had half of a middle finger, some kind of farm equipment accident in the 30's. He tied his shoes ok.

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    I must be in a really hole-in-the-wall sector of industry because it's very rare that I hear about banned jewelry in other shops or injury's related to rings (except online). I hear and have seen more to do with PPG and properly managing loose fitting cloths/hair/jewelry, but it's always been less of a "ban" and more of a "take care of your self, or deal with the consequences" thing. Now venture out of the shop into the cow-pasture and everyone has a story about getting sucked into a machine or losing a limb, but the "git-er-done" mentality runs the world out there.

    That said, I think the dangers certainly have merit, but your protocol depends on your employer or your experience. I wear my ring and have never had an issue with it, but I do favor that hand when I'm around stuff too. My ring is one of those tungsten carbide ones that fits pretty snug (as a side note, it will shatter before it bends if it gets crushed). It's had a crack in it since it was new and my wife offered to replace it, but I opted to keep it as a reminder that our marriage isn't indestructible and I should never take it for granted. I'm right handed too so my ring finger doesn't tend to be the first response to a wobble or falling item.

    I like the idea of taping a ring in place or putting it on a key ring or necklace as needed. In the end safety has to be an active thing, as in constantly be aware of what can hurt or kill you and act accordingly. Apathy hurts you more than anything else, so watch your corners and remember that your reflexes are there to save yourself, not the part or the machine.

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    Back when I got married in 1977 we both had wedding rings but I couldn't wear mine because of being in the trade so it sat in her jewelry box and is still there. I tried to put it on a while ago and could not get it past the first knuckle. I guess my fingers gained some weight!! back then I had a 32 inch waist now I am up to 36.

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  27. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by fusker View Post
    Around my ten-year wedding anniversary the ring got caught in a factory door handle. No real hurt but got me thinking. So I cut the ring and tin soldered it, to make it weak but still holding together. It stayed that way for another year, then my marriage finally folded.
    Should have done it long before!
    I was thinking along the same lines. Seems like a good idea. Wouldn't want to test it though.

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  29. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tooldude328 View Post
    Back when I got married in 1977 we both had wedding rings but I couldn't wear mine because of being in the trade so it sat in her jewelry box and is still there. I tried to put it on a while ago and could not get it past the first knuckle. I guess my fingers gained some weight!! back then I had a 32 inch waist now I am up to 36.
    Only a 36" waist? Lucky you. Back in the 70's I was so skinny I could get lost in a shadow. I don't have that problem today.

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    Maybe if you let (or had) your wife read the posts here she would understand why you don't want to wear a ring. Especially the posts saying a wife had decided she would rather see a finger without a ring than a ring without the finger. Putting it on for special events seems a good compromise.


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