What drill press is this?
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  1. #1
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    Default What drill press is this?

    Appears to be direct drive, bench model.. Any good?32168421354.jpg

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    Might be helpful to send picture of name plates, have you tried googling whatever name might be there?

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    I suspect this is a troll. Crap picture, no details, acts like he doesn't understand English.

    BEGONE

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    Looks to have a Jacobs 0 chuck (5/32" capacity), so it is a sensitive high speed drill for small holes. Nice nameplate on the front, so easy enough to identify for a person standing in front of it and/or taking better pictures.

    Larry

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    Looks to have a Jacobs 0 chuck (5/32" capacity), so it is a sensitive high speed drill for small holes. Nice nameplate on the front, so easy enough to identify for a person standing in front of it and/or taking better pictures.

    Larry
    The "cartridge" head resembles some of those this outfit built as direct or at least "inline" -drive for high-speed and/or sensitive drills ... or fast tappers.... 1874 onward:

    Allen Drill << Chas G Allen

    Seems over size for a Kira. See KHD-6 or a present-day Leutor.

    But have a look at the OLDER Leutor (Nihon Seimitsu Kikai Kosaku Co,.Ltd.) right next to this Kira:

    高速ボール盤 キラ|中古機械ならマシンライフ

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    Nope, I'm not a troll. Its at an estate sale and the auctioneer cant tell me the name.. or doesn't want to be bothered. I'd like a precision drill press and am trying to figure out if its worth the 2hr trip and really early am wakeup to go get it. I thought someone might recognize it by the color/shape so I could research it.

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    Looks like the motor has brushes. Means it can probably be speed controlled easily if it isn't already.

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    Looks to have a Jacobs 0 chuck (5/32" capacity), so it is a sensitive high speed drill for small holes. Nice nameplate on the front, so easy enough to identify for a person standing in front of it and/or taking better pictures.

    Larry
    maybe for drilling holes in electronic circuit boards

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    Quote Originally Posted by Subw00er View Post
    Nope, I'm not a troll. Its at an estate sale and the auctioneer cant tell me the name.. or doesn't want to be bothered. I'd like a precision drill press and am trying to figure out if its worth the 2hr trip and really early am wakeup to go get it. I thought someone might recognize it by the color/shape so I could research it.
    That's a lot of work for a seldom-seen.

    My Electro-Mechno W-105 was simply shipped.. from California to Virginia.
    I had BEEN looking for an Adolph Meuhlmatt/Hamilton or a P&W/Sigourney.

    Pick one of those three well-known ones, and you know in advance what they are, that they are easily shipped, and that they are eminently restorable to as-new
    functionality without significant risk or expense.

    Or if no attractive prices? Just fab yerself one.

    Fast, variable-speed spindles with common master collets are all over the place. Precision traverse just isn't that hard, either.

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    It might be a Jet jdp-11hs or whatever they copied to make it.

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    Welp, I went over and took a look at it today. Its a MSC 951203. I don't know much about it yet as info online is sparse. I don't know if they are any good, but it was too cute to pass up. It was $105; not sure if that's a good price, but I'm happy. I love the speed control (good call magpie), auto on/off feature, and it appears to be well made. Thanks for the info guys!

    More pics (not mine):
    MANHATTAN MSC 951203, 3,500 to 12,00 RPM, 180 W, Yukiwa 3MM Chuck, Bench Drill - $239.99 | PicClick

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    Quote Originally Posted by Subw00er View Post
    Welp, I went over and took a look at it today. Its a MSC 951203. I don't know much about it yet as info online is sparse. I don't know if they are any good, but it was too cute to pass up. It was $105; not sure if that's a good price, but I'm happy. I love the speed control (good call magpie), auto on/off feature, and it appears to be well made. Thanks for the info guys!

    More pics (not mine):
    MANHATTAN MSC 951203, 3,500 to 12,00 RPM, 180 W, Yukiwa 3MM Chuck, Bench Drill - $239.99 | PicClick
    Yah done good @ $105! VERY good! Even if you need to invest in new bearings or such.

    My Electro-Mechano with shipping was over triple that. Does need new wiring over the usual insulation age-cracking, but otherwise turned-out just fine.

    It also has a weird series/universal-wound motor with built-in vari-speed.

    So there ain't a lot of difference as to capability.

    Other than you having about $250 more dollars to go scout your NEXT "treasure".


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    Quote Originally Posted by Subw00er View Post
    Nope, I'm not a troll. Its at an estate sale and the auctioneer cant tell me the name.. or doesn't want to be bothered. I'd like a precision drill press and am trying to figure out if its worth the 2hr trip and really early am wakeup to go get it. I thought someone might recognize it by the color/shape so I could research it.
    Unless you have a real need or desire for a limited capacity, high speed machine, then no it isn't worth the ride.
    Not going to be a useful as drill-press with a capacity of 1/16 to 1/2" and speed range to match.

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    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    Unless you have a real need or desire for a limited capacity, high speed machine, then no it isn't worth the ride.
    Not going to be a useful as drill-press with a capacity of 1/16 to 1/2" and speed range to match.
    Well.. genius-late-to-the-party. You missed that he was LOOKING for one of this sort? Might hint he already knows the difference and HAS other DP's?

    Tell us just how well your 1/16" to 1/2" DP holds a number 80 drill?

    Or does it just break those?

    My 7 HP 5 MT Alzmetall AB5/S would barely even know a number 0 CHUCK was there. Might mistake it for an overly dull annular cutter and JF make a hole with it, Or a blob of glowing scrap metal. Brute Force & Bloody Ignorance writ 7 Horsepower geared and PIV Werner-Reimers drive large



    There's a decent little Walker-Turner in-between. 0" to 1/2", or so Jacobs claimed. Optimistically.

    When new and unworn, over 40 years ago, anyway.

    I'm good wit' dat' Cheap enough.

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    About thirty years ago, I visited an Amish machine shop near Grabill, IN. They had a diesel engine pumping oil to hydraulic motors running a bank of large multi-spindle screw machines. I think hydraulic hose fittings were their main product. As a supplement to their income, they made a line of turned brass objects that they hoped to sell to tourists. One was a milk can-shaped thing with two handles. It was heavy solid brass, not sheet brass. The handles were attached with maybe 1/16" pins driven into holes in the body of the can. I was amused to see the holes were drilled with a Jet sensitive drill press with a 110 V motor run from a generator somewhere. That was the only time I ever saw one of those drill presses outside of the catalog.

    They called the brass business Amish Kraft Co. and I found some of their milk cans for sale. Amish Kraft Company Solid Brass Miniatures/milk | Etsy
    They may ride behind horses, but they know how to use modern tech. Amish packager takes hands-on approach | Automation World

    When I saw the original post in this thread, I remembered the Amish Jet, but could not recall exactly what it looked like. Today I pulled a couple of Jet catalogs out of the files and took pictures of the two different Jet sensitive drill presses in them. The 82 catalog had the 7" swing Jet-6 drill and the 1993 catalog had the 11" swing JDP-11HS. You can see they have some resemblance to the Manhattan Supply Co. (MSC now) drill, especially the direct mount DC motor.

    Larry

    1982-jet-6.jpg 1982-jet-6-spec.jpg 1993-jdp-11hs.jpg 1993-jdp-11hs-spec.jpg

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  20. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Well.. genius-late-to-the-party. You missed that he was LOOKING for one of this sort? Might hint he already knows the difference and HAS other DP's?
    How could you possibly determine that from his posts?
    You flap you lips so much, you couldn't possibly hear somebody else talking in the same room with you, even if the room was empty and he was shouting through a megaphone.

    Someday Termite,....someday.

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    Lol Reggie, a couple posts up from yours, I mention I purchased it already. But I do find it interesting that thermite has jumped on most of my posts to lambast me in some way, and no one with authority ever calls him on it. I suppose its because he usually chimes in later with something useful?! Anywhoo, never mind that, I'm sure he likes the attention any way it comes, so, there you go my friend.

    I honest to God have no use for this thing. Since I heard of precision bench drill presses, I've wanted it mostly because its small and adorable, and I am innately drawn to such things. I don't run a pro shop, or make money from my tools per se like many of you, but I do enjoy tinkering and I find that the more capability I have, the more I can do. I eventually do use most of the weird tools I have bought for kicks. I like searching for, collecting, cleaning, and storing tools as much as I do using them. Is that wrong?

    With that said, I think it would be awesome to use this little drill for m2-m4 tapping in ABS. I do a lot of 3d printing and often need to clean and tap holes. I really doubt there is tapmatic at this scale, but it has a DC motor, so I can maybe rig up some sort of quick reversing switch. Probably not.

    From the same auction, I picked up a $180 machinist tool box, which was a little steep for me. I bought it on a whim without any real investigation into the contents (as you do in the intense first 5 minutes of a tool-based estate sale). It turns out it was pretty loaded with Starrett and B&S stuff, much of which I didn't already have, so that was a nice surprise. It was like Christmas walking through the drawers of this old box. I found a ton of reamers, taps, a 10" sine, Starrett taper gages and micrometers, B&S gage blocks, Mitutoyo v blocks, indicators, etc. There was all of the little normal stuff too like calipers, maybe 30 end mills in cases, tiny drill bit sets for the press, and, I shit you not, like 30 rulers of varying quality and scale. Why did he need so many 6" rulers?! He had a lot of Threadwell couterbores, some of which are two-piece with a set screw which I need to figure out how to use (fun). There was even a first gen Starrett indicator in perfect shape with accessories, which is really cool. This fellow took really good care of his tools, nearly every tool was rust free.

    The box it self is not labeled, but the clasps have a little Eagle icon and bird on them. It looks like wood, but its metal sheathed. I'll likely sell that to try and recoup some cash.

    I also snagged a $50 Collins Micro-flat surface plate. Its in great shape and quite pretty, well, pretty by surface plate standards.. its still a hunk of granite.

    As I was walking out the door, I randomly noticed in the living room a huge Starrett V block and clamp in perfect shape. Snagged that for $15.

    Ok, now I'm blabbing about my score like Mr. Pete. Anyway, really glad I made the long trip, and thanks for the help guys!

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  23. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    How could you possibly determine that from his posts?
    Not hard. I actually read his posts before responding.

    You should give it a try.

    You flap you lips so much, you couldn't possibly hear somebody else talking in the same room with you, even if the room was empty and he was shouting through a megaphone.

    Someday Termite,....someday.
    Someday what, JD?

    Someday I'll become as oblivious as you are and clock as many bankruptcy filings as you have?

    Don't hold your breath.

    Well.. on second thought?

    Go right ahead and do that until I suffocate ...if it helps with your little needy-greedy whiner-hater-blame-others fetish.

    I'm easy.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Subw00er View Post
    Lol Reggie, a couple posts up from yours, I mention I purchased it already. But I do find it interesting that thermite has jumped on most of my posts to lambast me in some way,
    LOL!

    Only when you BEG for it. This wasn't one of those times!



    With that said, I think it would be awesome to use this little drill for m2-m4 tapping in ABS. I do a lot of 3d printing and often need to clean and tap holes. I really doubt there is tapmatic at this scale, but it has a DC motor, so I can maybe rig up some sort of quick reversing switch. Probably not.
    Probably too much inertia on the motor, even at that small a size. The Swiss make bespoke tappers for even smaller, but they cost accordingly.

    Both Tapmatic and Procunier very much DO make auto-reversing units for really, really tiny taps, much smaller than M2!

    But both units are - ironically - a tad on the large side for this size DP to readily mount and drive. Also not cheap ....unless you luck into them on PM or eBay (guilty).

    What you might find both useful and affordable instead is a sort of free-floating adapter with a knurled ring for control with the finger tips.

    Not having any luck finding a source just now. The usual suspects amongst the NYC suppliers to the horological trade mayhap?

    Someone else should be along with that. It's PM.

    They do work rather well.

    << snip outrageous tool gloat! >>

    Lucky bastid!

    Anyway, really glad I made the long trip, and thanks for the help guys!
    Luck like that you should BBQ a goat. Or at least enjoy a chik'n sandwich, given the economy as it is?


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