The Youngstown Ingot Mold Railway
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  1. #1
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    Default The Youngstown Ingot Mold Railway

    For the past month or so I've been working on a new project out here at Youngstown Steel Heritage. I want to add a bit of steel industry rail operations to the museum, so have decided to construct a narrow gauge ingot mold railway for demonstrating the teeming, handling and stripping of ingot molds in a steel mill.

    ingot-mold-train.jpg
    In the steel industry, before the advent of continuous casters, steel assumed its first solid form as ingots. Ingots were made by pouring steel into ingot molds, heavy iron castings that contained the steel as it solidified. The molds were filled (teemed) on very heavy flatcars known as ingot buggies on the teeming platforms in the open hearth shop then moved to a yard where the ingots solidified. From there they were moved to the stripper building where the molds were pulled off of the ingots and placed on empty buggies on an adjacent track. The ingots in the cars were then moved to the soaking pits and the molds, after receiving a lime wash, went back to the open hearth for teeming again.

    I have enough room at the museum to replicate the teeming and stripping processes. In front of our building I am planning on erecting half of a teeming ladle that we saved from Duquesne Works, and by running a spur track under it I'll be able to spot buggies for simulated teeming. From there we go around back of the building into a new addition where the Morgan crane would do the ingot stripping.

    loco-cyclopedia.jpg
    The track gauge will be 23", and the motive power will consist of Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. No. 58, an 0-4-0T Porter that will be coming to the museum very soon. We will most likely build our own ingot buggies, and for ingots we will obtain them from the last ingot mold maker in the US, which happens to be located five miles from the museum.

    ysm-aerial-two-foot-trackage-revision2.jpg
    The track plan shows the extent of the railway. The red line is track that we have built over the past month, and the blue is track to be built. The initial portion is 100 lb. rail, going down to 85 lb. ASCE for the rest. The curve is 40 ft. radius and it is laid on steel ties to hold everything together.

    When completed, the ingot mold railway will join the Tod Engine, the Hot Metal Train and the Rotary Converter as the main exhibits at the Youngstown Steel Heritage Museum. The museum holds two open houses per year, in June and September.

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    img_5733-small.jpg

    img_5732-small.jpg

    This is how the 58 looks currently. The frame is very heavy, made of solid steel plate which the previous owner removed portions of. I'll be putting that back on. It needs a new cab, new water tank, and boiler repaired and retubed.

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    Fantastic!...... I love your description, it sounds just like someone talking about the model railroad they are building in their basement.... Except when you pull on the throttle it will move tons!

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    Man, I wish I lived near you.

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    Wow that thing looks heavy alright, my screen bent when I opened the photo! Looks like quite a project.

    Charles

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    Quote Originally Posted by CBlair View Post
    Wow that thing looks heavy alright, my screen bent when I opened the photo! Looks like quite a project.

    Charles
    That is the best thing I've read all day! However, even as heavy as it is, this locomotive still weighs six tons less than the Tod Engine's crankshaft!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdleach View Post
    Man, I wish I lived near you.
    Yes me too. Hell, I wish SOMEBODY lived near me! Its just two of us working on this project.

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    Rick,
    in one of your post you say that the last steel ingot mold maker isin Youngstown. A few years back on an SIA tour we visited a ingot mold maker near charleston WV. Are they now gone?
    Todd

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    I'm curious about the 23" gauge. I know 24" was pretty common but why would they use 23" when 24" equipment was so common?

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    Centre Foundry north of Wheeling may still be making ingot molds aside from EEC in Hubbard. Don't know of one near Charleston.

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    Your correct it was Wheeling.

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    Don't scrap those cute little Maytag engines under the cab!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Rowlands View Post
    img_5733-small.jpg

    img_5732-small.jpg

    This is how the 58 looks currently. The frame is very heavy, made of solid steel plate which the previous owner removed portions of. I'll be putting that back on. It needs a new cab, new water tank, and boiler repaired and retubed.
    Great project! - Is this locomotive at Jonas Stutzman's boiler shop at Middlefield, Ohio?

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    Above shots were taken at JS Company.

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    If you just moved your part of Ohio to near the rest of us it'd be easier to help you

    Serious question - when I toured the Nucor plant in Seattle, they ran/discussed their system, which I guess you might call batch pour (?)
    The ladle is poured into a tuyer (sp) which spits out a long bar (a bloom?)

    It wasn't "continuous" - they were pouring 1 cupola/furnace full at at time, and I think that makes 1 bloom. Those cooled by themselves (no mold around them.)

    The Question: When do you think that change over first occured? It sure seems to have a lot less infrastructure, but obviously the pouring/cooling of the blooms (right term?) has to be Exactly Right....

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    Quote Originally Posted by locoguy View Post
    Above shots were taken at JS Company.
    J.S. Company does top notch restorations on boilers and engines, along with making new boilers and engines with all the certifications required. Here is a video of a new steam traction engine he has built.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q4fS...8yKmag&index=1

    More information about the company is posted here: "Brand new" Advance 6hp - SmokStak

    If J.S. Company is doing the restoration of this steam locomotive for the Youngstown Ingot Mold Railway, it should be in fine condition when done.

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    Now that is cool.

    Wonder how much it costs.

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    J.S. Company will be doing the boilerwork on the J&L 58. I will be doing everything else.

    I have asked a graphic designer to create an artwork depicting 58 that we can use for fundraising purposes.
    artwork-version-3.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryan_machine View Post
    If you just moved your part of Ohio to near the rest of us it'd be easier to help you

    Serious question - when I toured the Nucor plant in Seattle, they ran/discussed their system, which I guess you might call batch pour (?)
    The ladle is poured into a tuyer (sp) which spits out a long bar (a bloom?)

    It wasn't "continuous" - they were pouring 1 cupola/furnace full at at time, and I think that makes 1 bloom. Those cooled by themselves (no mold around them.)

    The Question: When do you think that change over first occurred? It sure seems to have a lot less infrastructure, but obviously the pouring/cooling of the blooms (right term?) has to be Exactly Right....
    Not a bloom but a real genuine billet. It is continuous casting. Continuous does not mean every minute. It means that the ladle is poured continuously. It is poured into a reservoir called a tundish. The metal flows from there to water cooled molds which make a ninety degree turn so that the billets are discharged horizontally. To start the pour the square tubes are filled by a dummy bar. As the casting starts the dummies pulled the bar out. At this point the centers are still near liquid. As the billets reach the end of their travel they are cut in motion with an oxygen lance. They can go straight to a rolling mill or cool and be reheated for rolling.
    I think the first continuous casters were around 1960. It was not an overnight change. I saw ingots bottom poured at Eastern Stainless in Baltimore around 1980.

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    Ingots are still used by mills that make specialty metals or that need limited amounts of large shapes. Arcelor Mittal in Coatesville, PA still casts ingots for rolling wide plates, and heavy forgings start out as ingots too.


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