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  1. #1
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    Default any knowledgeable want an apprenticeeee. will work for knowledge

    hello my name is Mike I live in Melbourne Florida in Brevard County I'm trying to find somebody that can teach me about machining. I know there has to be someone out there or a group that loves to pass down the knowledge I am very eager to learn and would be greatly appreciative. I have recently gotten a Bridgeport series 1 variable speed Mill and a maybe 1980s Clausing Colchester 13-in lathe I'm in the process trying to figure out their power service( my garage is resid. split phase zervice) I'm hoping to get them up and running either by vfd or are rpc ... I definitely would like to maintain the stock controls on the lathe. anyway as soon as they're running or maybe even help me get them running I would love to find someone knowledgeable about machining and setting up machines and so on... does anyone know how I could do this? I have looked at community college classes I'm trying to figure that out with my work schedule but I really would like to meet a machinist or even a journeyman.. perhaps there is a group have people like me that have a love for creating things from metal and of course heavy machines if anyone has any information how I could accomplish this please let me know thank you very much

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    Mike,

    This forum tends to cater mostly to professional machinists who are in the trade making a living as machinists. If you are more of a hobbyist and new to machining, I would suggest that you try this forum:

    Forum list | The Hobby-Machinist

    There are some very knowledgeable folks on that site that cater more to the beginner/hobbyist. Also, if you do a little searching on their webiste you will find a thread for machinist groups around the country and I'm sure there must be some in Florida.

    Just a suggestion.

    Ted

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  4. #3
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    If you're on the Fakebook, there are machine shop forums geared toward the home shop or hobbyist. I would look there. I have had some success connecting with people.

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    I'm afraid "real" machinists are a dying breed. The future, and therefore the training, is all in CNC. That's also why the prices have tumbled on the manual machines. There just aren't many left to use them outside of the hobbyists.

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJD View Post
    I'm afraid "real" machinists are a dying breed. The future, and therefore the training, is all in CNC. That's also why the prices have tumbled on the manual machines. There just aren't many left to use them outside of the hobbyists.
    Which is great for us hobbyists. And Pakistan, India, etc.

  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mxracer2525 View Post
    hello my name is Mike I live in Melbourne Florida in Brevard County I'm trying to find somebody that can teach me about machining. I know there has to be someone out there or a group that loves to pass down the knowledge I am very eager to learn and would be greatly appreciative. I have recently gotten a Bridgeport series 1 variable speed Mill and a maybe 1980s Clausing Colchester 13-in lathe I'm in the process trying to figure out their power service( my garage is resid. split phase zervice) I'm hoping to get them up and running either by vfd or are rpc ... I definitely would like to maintain the stock controls on the lathe. anyway as soon as they're running or maybe even help me get them running I would love to find someone knowledgeable about machining and setting up machines and so on... does anyone know how I could do this? I have looked at community college classes I'm trying to figure that out with my work schedule but I really would like to meet a machinist or even a journeyman.. perhaps there is a group have people like me that have a love for creating things from metal and of course heavy machines if anyone has any information how I could accomplish this please let me know thank you very much
    Straying a bit regarding your search for a live and in person mentor...

    But unless your well versed in Bridgeports you may want to check out H&W Machine Repair on YouTube....They have a series of vids that cover every bit of Bridgeport service and teardown.

    Spending some time servicing and adjusting the mill will pay dividends. Big one is the lube system which, on used machine will require service and keep you busy.

    Lube system, gibs, and tightening up the backlash should be top of the list.

  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJD View Post
    I'm afraid "real" machinists are a dying breed. The future, and therefore the training, is all in CNC. That's also why the prices have tumbled on the manual machines. There just aren't many left to use them outside of the hobbyists.
    I have to disagree with your statement. The manual machine will never be as popular as it once was, especially in manufacturing,you are correct. However, the requirement will never go away for the manual machine tool. They are still and will always be required in the job shop. They are still being made and sold new worldwide. I would also add the skills required to drive these manual machines are very much in demand today and in the future. I sincerely hope you do not think the only professional machinists are CNC guys, if you do you would be very wrong. Never confuse a hobbyist with an amateur, many are true professionals with many years of experience. Many of the existing professional machinists today are hobbyists, in so much as they are their own biggest customer and answer to no one but themselves. Not only have these hobbyists invested a lifetime to acquire their knowledge, but many have also invested a small fortune of their personal money in machine tools. There are many folks here on this forum that incorrectly consider all hobbyists to be amateurs and lower class citizens. Some of course are, but certainly not all.

    Mike,
    I love to teach, I do it as much as I can, but learning takes time and a real passion. Not only do you as a teacher have to have the time, but so does the student and it is all too often not available.

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    Mike, I think it is an Ok/good post.
    Very likely a retired experienced machine tool guy would like to get hands-on machines and teach you some machining skills.
    Perhaps a guy like that could show you an eBay product you might sell to help you build your shop. A simple drill press can be handy and a drill tap chart. Measuring tools.. jobber set of drills by 64s.. ..a digital caliper is a good all-around device good for .001 or so, and a bargain one only $30.. A simple lathe boring bar..you can make. Right off the bat, you need to learn to turn good threads to a high-quality bought nut and to a 3 wire size....and how to run a part between centers. likely need a 1,2 3" micrometer Ok used is ok to start. Good to have a simple bench grinder and learn how to grind a HHS tool bit...not just for threading bit but for O-ring grooves and odd shapes.

    Get a good how to run a lathe book and do everything in the book for practice.

    at first, advertize "will turn a precision bearing or threaded shaft up to 3" x 36"..yes likely need a steady rest to do some of these, and need to know how to make a good key-way (with the lathe or the mill)..and how to make a diameter to .0002 or so.. figure on charging $10 an hour because at first, you will be slow and so not do much work in an hour. Specialize and be good/great at one thing and after a time you will get work. Doing everything (every kind of work/jobs) takes way too much tooling at first. You could spend $20k or $100k and get little work trying to do everything at first..

    One very good talent is to not spend all day looking for some lost tool, a simple tool pushcart and even an open tool tote basket can save hours of time. You fill it with this job-only stuff.

    Self-learning or being taught buy a skill guy may miss safety guidelines
    here is a very simple set of rules.https://www.gvsu.edu/cms4/asset/8FCA...guidelines.pdf

    Oh. and good to have an extra ground wire on machines.

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  13. #9
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    I didn't say the manual machines are going away...just that the highly skilled machinists who used them are dying out with the death of the "greatest generation". Within a decade all the technicians will be CNC "managers", who occasionally have to fire up the ancient Bridgeport in the dark back corner of the shop...and sweat bullets that se/he doesn't screw it up.

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    Hey, I am a 4th year apprentice, here is some words of advice.

    I was mainly taught CNC. My training on manual machines was very limited, shitty bridgeport clones and chinese lathes you could literally feel the runout with your hand. That was what I wanted to learn the most though. There are TONS of youtube channels that have hundreds of years of experience between them, that are willing to share their knowledge. I am at work and can't give a list, but off the top of my head, This Old Tony (my favorite), Robin Renzetti (I misspelt his last name maybe), Stefan gotteswinter, just to name three. Follow them on instagram, they usually share other creators photos and then you can find other channels. These guys' knowledge is insanely valuable, just the little tips and tricks you learn from decades of experience.

    I learned more from all of them than my instructor for manual machining. But then again, my instructor is mostly a CNC guy, he was doing CNC back when it was using some sort of paper reels to program them.

    You don't need an apprenticeship to learn. Just get out to the shop and do projects. If you go to the website for NIMS, they have a bunch of prints for their machining certs that you can print off for practice, if you want to learn to take something from print to part.

  15. #11
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    To second the YouTube channels, there are several. A couple members here have channels. Myself included. I am a manual only for profit machine shop

    My channel:
    Topper Machine LLC. - YouTube

    Look through my channels tab. There are a lot more good ones there.

    Sent from my rotary dial flip fone

  16. #12
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    First I think it's great you have interest in learning machine work. It can give you a lifetime of pleasure either as a professional or hobby.
    You should be able to find some older machinist, probably you will need to go down to the local coffee hangout and introduce yourself to the old men group there. If there isn't a machinist in the group they probably will know someone.
    I know in ours you can find everything from a architect to zoo keeper. Most are just looking for something to fill there time.
    Most like myself are not the most computer savvy or for several other reasons just look at these kind of things once every few months.
    For me I sold my large shop a few years ago and got bored and bought a building and some machines for something to do. It's turned into a full time job and I turn down 75% of the work that walks in the door.
    I would be more than willing to help someone if they wanted to learn. I have several friends around the country who are the same. Sorry none close to you.
    On the manual machine issue. It takes far longer to learn the manual trade for all kinds of different reasons. It's also a education issue most kids today have no idea what a trig table is used for, or how to lay out a irregular bolt hole pattern. For the cnc guys they can just down load a drawing or punch in a preprogrammed program.
    I don't think you will ever see a comeback of manual machines for production but will continue to have a place in repair, tooling, prototype, maintenance shops.
    Good luck, if you happen to be in the Phoenix area let me know. I would be happy to share what I can and give you a ten cent tour of a nickel shop.
    Mike

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