BRIDGEPORT Attachments questions
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  1. #1
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    Default BRIDGEPORT Attachments questions

    This question would be best answered by some of the Bridgeport old-timers.
    In some of my searches I discover new(old) attachmments for bridgeport/type machines.
    When you look on ebay you see the standard Bridgeport type heads Right angle and
    Quillmaster. The Volstro type accesories-angle head/rotary head/slotting head.
    The speedline grinding/high speed attachment.
    A new one I just recently discovered is/was the Bore/mate boring facing attachment.
    All part of the hey-day of pre CNC milling.
    It got me thinking I wonder if there are other sim,ilar types of gems that have
    faded into history so to speak?
    Is there some sort of web-site somewhere that deals with all things Bridgeport
    so to speak and may have info relating to some of these things that may be less
    known?

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    PDF downloads here:

    Bridgeport Factory Literature
    John

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    This site has a lot of historical stuff including Bridgeport. Of course it leans towards British but it is still a handy resource.

    Bridgeport Milling Machines

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    All the bridgeport attachments/accessories were listed in old Bridgeport brochures. Which can be found online without too much trouble.

    WHAT I AM LOOKING FOR: is less common/less known attachments that were made by after-markiet mfg's for Bridgeport type mills, as I suggested

    Volstro/Speedline/BoreMate Any others ??????

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    IF it's the boremate attachment I recall, then it's certainly interesting even if it's usefulness is questionable. The piece I am thinking of clamped to the quill and you could feed it out by hand via a graduated dial on a rather bulky, stationary casting.

    The issue was if you ran it too fast there were some spring loaded elements that let the slide feed out radially strictly by centrifugal forces, making the graduations on the dial totally irrelevant.

    The volstro rotary and even the angle head I still occasionally use, generally after I welded up a piece and have to pick up a line on a part with no working drawings other than my own napkin sketches.

    Other than the odd repair / salvage; CNC pretty much relegated all of the lightweight knee mill attachments to the curio shelf As a rule not fast to set up, they eat up daylight between quill and the work and remove materiel agonizingly slowly.

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    cyclotronguy. Thank you for the insightful bit of information.
    I'm hoping there might still be more to learn.
    OK, I'll let the cat out of the bag as to part of my motivation.
    I'm rebuilding a Rockwell horz./vertical mill.
    and so far I've adapted a Quillmaster head and 2 Bridgeport
    right angle heads. The larger right angle head will help me
    if/when I want to do any helical milling with the universal
    dividing head, seeings the table doesn't angle.
    I could do it by tilting the vertical head, but by putting the right angle head on It'll save tramming the head later.
    I've also adapted a Parkson slotting head to the horizontal spindle.
    My interest in the boremate was largely to be able to bore large
    holes without stopping the spindle for adjustment.
    But that the second time I've read about spring loading/unpredicatability. Not too promising there.
    If there are other weird unusual accessories or attachments
    that any can remember seeing/reading about/hearing about.
    I'd like to hear from you.
    1) I'd like to see if any would be adaptable to the Rockwell
    for some tangible improvement and also with a bunch of useful
    accesories, it'll make my Rockwell a bit more Like a Deckel
    in terms of versatility.
    Before you say it I know you can't make a Seiko into a Rolex.
    2)I have a historical interest in such things.
    3) I've already contacted Tony @ lathes.uk re: this subject
    and suggested maybe he expand the Bridgeport section to some
    extent to allow for some of this type of information.
    If he's interested, I will certainly pass along anything I can find.

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    Wally

    At one time there were all sorts of things to bolt on to B'port series 1's and all as I indicted ate up daylight, and demanded a riser between base and ram casting. And I still keep a 9" riser in the B'port 9' x 42" at home.... very handy.

    As for the rolex from the timex analogy, you might want to find a "Tree" brand taper boring head. This allows you to bore tapers easily as well as face. They were normally B&S taper or st shank. Shank unscrews so you can fab whatever you want.

    And if you are trying to catalog the odd-ball stuff I may still have docs on an all mechanical "circular interpolation": attachment that my parents had on a Moore Jig bore in the 60's. Think rotary table geared to the spindle down feed . In the B'port I think it was actually gear'd to the knee elevation. Will poke through "old paper" and see.

    And there may also be a National "keyseater" attachment in a cigar box at my parents Again very light duty and slow. That used tiny cutters driven by an even smaller gear train. I think you could keyseat bores as small as 5/8".

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