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  1. #81
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    Not familiar with all the terminology but do have a pretty nice slab of granite left over from a kitchen remodel - would that suffice as a surface plate? Never heard of 123 or 246 blocks. Looked them up on the net and would have to buy them if I have a need.

    Squares - I have a few but they are not machinist squares. Don't know how accurate they are; will just have to evaluate as I go I suppose.

    Lots to absorb - need to ramp up the learning curve.

    Thanks,

    Doug

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dumpster_Fire_Tap_Stirrer View Post
    Not familiar with all the terminology but do have a pretty nice slab of granite left over from a kitchen remodel - would that suffice as a surface plate? Never heard of 123 or 246 blocks. Looked them up on the net and would have to buy them if I have a need.
    Damned shame, that.

    Got the same f******g issue with food, bum-fodder, and motor fuel.

    Go figure?

    How about you make use of the internet and BECOME "familiar with all the terminology"?


  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dtapster View Post
    Not familiar with all the terminology but do have a pretty nice slab of granite left over from a kitchen remodel - would that suffice as a surface plate? Never heard of 123 or 246 blocks. Looked them up on the net and would have to buy them if I have a need.

    Squares - I have a few but they are not machinist squares. Don't know how accurate they are; will just have to evaluate as I go I suppose.

    Lots to absorb - need to ramp up the learning curve.

    Thanks,

    Doug
    No, kitchen counters will not be good enough. A machinist's surface plate would likely be flat to within .0002" over the entire surface, possibly orders of magnitude flatter than a countertop. Its an essential tool.

    What I'm suggesting is starting with the inspection tools, what I call "master tools", that you will need to inspect the tools you purchase subsequently. That way you can buy second hand or third world tools and be able to inspect them and know what you have.

    With respect to Termite, I don't believe what I'm talking about is readily accessible on the internet. That's why I'm posting this. Links like this and the many toolbox tour youtube videos focus on tools an apprentice would bring to a machine shop on his first day. You will need all those tools. And they are expensive. But what I'm saying is, you need to think about the tools that are already in the machine shop when the apprentice arrives. There's a lot more to a machine shop than machines!

    I figured it all out- you will too. I enjoyed this part- learning about all the gear you need. Hope you do too.

  4. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    With respect to Termite, I don't believe what I'm talking about is readily accessible on the internet.
    Kidding? Or being obtuse "for effect?"

    Not only is it readily available in SEVERAL places "on the internet", as well as "dead tree" library books, anyone who makes the least effort will find it all discussed to the very death "Right here, on PM", over looong years already, and "more than just the one time."

    There is NO practical way we can read FOR a person who will read posts.. spoon-feeding one tiny morsel at each go.. but NOT read the broader background information as to concepts nor common practice, history, etc. so as to build himself the sort of framework, skeleton, or "storage shelving" if you will - to store or "hang" the dribs and drabs of information ON TO so it coalesces into a "body of knowledge". which can then grow as it needs to grow.

    UNTIL he does that?

    PM community contributions are about as useful as trying to cazy-glue the crack of dawn, one drop at a time. Whilst "Dawn" is trying to earn her living with it, yet!




    The contributions just keep falling though the "cracks". No "retention". No cumulative progression. No "building" from simple to less-so.

    OP has to make a change and TRY to fill-in the basics of his OWN initiative.

    Or all that ends when the last patient volunteer grows weary of attempting the impossible.

    Conveying information to a hole in the ether that gives FAR LESS of a damn than THEY do.

    OP need not be any sort of "genius". He does need to get off his mentally-lazy "one-way" ass and at least TRY to learn what to DO with all this "unfamiliar terminology" so it is far LESS "unfamiliar".

    How HARD is it to Go Ogle:

    "1.2.3 blocks"? (over 6 million hits)

    "Surface plate?" (681 million hits)

    Even "Granite countertop as surface plate" gets over 60 hits!

    This NOT "new news!"

    If he gets it wrong? That can be helped. Quickly, even.

    IF he doesn't care to be BOTHERED? Strangers should do all the work? At their expense in time and effort? There's an endless supply of helpful volunteers?

    How long can that last when there isn't even the modest reward of;

    "OH, I GET it now!"

    That's harder. And 'not much longer'.

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    Directed to Thermite: (won't quote him since at least one member here has requested that I not).


    I "invited" you to leave this thread some time ago because of your obnoxious, offensive, and sarcastic behavior and comments. You chose not to take the advice. Instead you doubled down and came back with more inappropriate drivel. Nobody here really cares what you think because all you are is a pain in the A$$. Since you seem to be big on recommendations here's one for you: How about taking all that bilge and shove it where the sun doesn't shine???

    If this gets me thrown off of this board, so be it. Thanks to all others for your helpful comments.

    Doug

    P.S. Thermite "gumped"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dtapster View Post
    I "invited" you to leave this thread some time ago because of your obnoxious, offensive, and sarcastic behavior and comments. You chose not to take the advice.
    *yawn*

    You mistook yourself for GOD? Pretzelbent Buyed-In? KIM, Jong Un-derwear?

    Or just thought you were my wife?

    I mean.. I DO take advice, but still... even 30 years on, I assure you, she is still WORTH it! God, too, for that matter.

    You and those other two career failures can get yer own dam' cawfee.

    "In other news"..

    "Invited"? Didja?

    I'm kinda pickey about "invitations" as to "from whom". Or what and why.

    "PM" is a place where those who work "materials" professionally in manufacturing may suffer an industrial accident - meet the medical professionals who may treat those accidents, other who's manufactured product is repair "parts" for worn-out human ones, the Managers and shop owners who try to reduce such risks, the Insurance Undwerwriters and Lawyers who deal with the before and after, the researchers of new materials, those who deal in new and used means of production, the MHE to move them, the land or buildings to house them, the utilities to service those facilities, the money invested, used to fund operations, buy and sell tooling, keep economic score, or try to ascertain the future of various bits of industry, plus the keepers of the flame of history on what came before..

    ...and a thousand other specialized points of view relevant to Manufacturing and its technologies.

    A healthy exchange among those many and varied contributors is sometimes fractious. Can't be helped. All are individuals, too.

    The WISE just seive-out the "nutritious" bits of our shared "stone soup" party, put them to our own many and varied uses, and carry-on.

    Building a future. On an industrial scale.

    You have an arrested development "emotional" problem with running YOUR life in the "rear view mirror"?

    No foul.

    You might have simply wandered into the wrong godown?

    Stay. Grown to adulthood, however late in life. Or not.

    Not my problem, either way. "Stone soup" cauldron is large enough that even the odd turd in the soup diminishes to a mere "delicate flavour".

    Linda like over-age-in grade petrified Liverwurst & Limberger cheese, is it?

    I think I'd rather have grated black truffles, but one can't be overly picky at the price .


  8. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    No, kitchen counters will not be good enough. A machinist's surface plate would likely be flat to within .0002" over the entire surface, possibly orders of magnitude flatter than a countertop. Its an essential tool.

    What I'm suggesting is starting with the inspection tools, what I call "master tools", that you will need to inspect the tools you purchase subsequently. That way you can buy second hand or third world tools and be able to inspect them and know what you have.

    With respect to Termite, I don't believe what I'm talking about is readily accessible on the internet. That's why I'm posting this. Links like this and the many toolbox tour youtube videos focus on tools an apprentice would bring to a machine shop on his first day. You will need all those tools. And they are expensive. But what I'm saying is, you need to think about the tools that are already in the machine shop when the apprentice arrives. There's a lot more to a machine shop than machines!

    I figured it all out- you will too. I enjoyed this part- learning about all the gear you need. Hope you do too.
    Adam,

    Taking a look at the list in your link, looks like I have everything but #4)Deburring tool set and #8) Edge finder - will work on getting those.

    Will do some more work on YouTube with instructional videos about tools and operation. Been busy with other matters and projects this week. The seller offered the use of his other Bridgeport mill (when not in use for jobs). Said I was welcome to come down and familiarize myself with it and practice on some material, generous I thought. I plan to take him up on it, again since it will be a while until my mill is delivered.

    Thanks,

    Doug

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    Looks like you got a new friend in the way of your seller, can't beat that. Keep checking craigslist in your area under tools "machinist" and you'll find some nice deals from retired machinists that don't need their tools any longer. Happy hunting!

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    Did some research on phase conversion for this mill installation. Saw where "Jon" from H&W made a comment online about VFD's and decided to give them a call. Was connected to Barry, the owner and had a very nice, detailed discussion with him about the topic. They sell a solid state converter.

    Solid State Phase Converter, 1-1/2 - 2HP Motor

    Said you lose about 8% of the horsepower rating; they have over 1,000 of these installed with no problems. The thing that was attractive to me about this device is that you use the existing controls on the machine, and not those on a VFD. Made in the USA and moderately priced. Anyone using one and could comment?

    Thanks,

    Doug

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    That is a static style converter. I used that style for years on a BP with no issues. Nowadays with several 3 phase machines I use a rotary converter.

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    Pretty sure my comment was on this thread, but I use one at home. I use one to run 3 3 phase motors, only ever (at most) 2 at a time because my power feed and spindle motor on my Knight #2 are 3 phase. No moving parts, the unit is basically only on when power is applied to the motor. Been using mine at home for about 3 years now.

    Jon

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    Id also recommend leaving people be who you dont like/dont wanna hear from. Trying to tell Thermite to stay away isnt gonna work.

    If you dont like a response, move on. Itll make your life easier.

    Personally, I try and decipher his responses as if theyre the zodiac letters.

    Jon

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    Quote Originally Posted by HWElecRepair View Post
    Id also recommend leaving people be who you dont like/dont wanna hear from. Trying to tell Thermite to stay away isnt gonna work.

    If you dont like a response, move on. Itll make your life easier.

    Personally, I try and decipher his responses as if theyre the zodiac letters.

    Jon
    To each his own on verbal abuse and profanity laced language on a public forum - always been a "Golden Rule" guy myself. Not being a psychologist I react on what people say, not what I think they meant - YMMV. His verbiage was pretty clear.

    On the other boards I visit, the mods would've already thrown him off, and not leave it to the members to endure.

    Doug
    Last edited by Dtapster; 02-19-2021 at 01:26 AM.

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    Hi,
    I have my 3PH, BP and a 1940's, Horz. Wellsaw.

    I bought a 7.5HP Chi-Com 3PH motor and had an old washing machine 1/2 HP motor as a starter.

    Made a "Stone Age" RPC, this was before, VFD's were so cheap as today, but my RPC, has worked well for me close to 20 years so can't complain.

    Just sayin, different ways to go and plenty of help on this Forum to do so!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 666.jpg  

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    Thinking about a rotary phase converter now. In addition to the mill, I have a South Bend lathe and Dewalt RAS that both have 3 phase motors. With an RPC I could at least power the mill and lathe both pretty easily as they will be located in the same metalworking area.

    American Rotary seems to be a name that is prominent in this area. Made in America and gets good reviews online. Their AR5 and AD5 are both 5 HP models and are reasonably priced with free shipping. I don't have any expertise in this area and have no interest in building one. Anyone have experience with this brand or any other package you could recommend?

    Thanks,

    Doug

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    I have an American Rotary converter powering my Bridgeport. It’s been installed for about 10 years now. No problems at all, and it was pretty easy to install. Just needed a 3 pole breaker on the output. Mine is a variable speed series one, and I rebuilt the adjustable pulley with new bushings so I didn’t see a need for a VFD. I bought the converter based on reviews online, and it’s performance so far has lived up to the reviews.

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    Quote Originally Posted by just4grins View Post
    I have an American Rotary converter powering my Bridgeport. Itís been installed for about 10 years now. No problems at all, and it was pretty easy to install. Just needed a 3 pole breaker on the output. Mine is a variable speed series one, and I rebuilt the adjustable pulley with new bushings so I didnít see a need for a VFD. I bought the converter based on reviews online, and itís performance so far has lived up to the reviews.
    Glad to hear of your positive experience with them. Spent quite a bit of time talking to one of their reps yesterday - nice guy, very helpful and patient. I ordered the AD5; was able to get a nice discount on a "scratch and dent" unit. Also ordered their 3 phase distribution panel and a couple of 3 phase breakers (ouch$$$). Spoke with my electrician and his supplier couldn't touch their prices on panel and breakers. Good to go when the mill is delivered.

    Doug

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    My opinion is that if the mill is bolted to the floor then that means something. They took the trouble to do something right and it probably reflects on how
    the mill was treated. Chrome ways and all that. I would talk price and be afraid of offending the owner if I'm too low.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    My opinion is that if the mill is bolted to the floor then that means something. They took the trouble to do something right and it probably reflects on how
    the mill was treated. Chrome ways and all that. I would talk price and be afraid of offending the owner if I'm too low.
    Dtapster said on 2-8-2021:

    "Met with the seller today. Looked at the mill, fired it up and covered the various components and their operation. With my limited knowledge I didn't find or see anything alarming. Negotiations went well; he began at $6K and we eventually settled on $4,800. In my estimation this machine has been well cared for and I've developed a nice healthy relationship with the seller, which is a good thing."


    Did you see this?

    Doug


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