Bridgeport Mill: How to set on unlevel floor - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    These are the style I have.

    https://www.mscdirect.com/browse/tn/...108+4287623044

    Hex head on the shaft extends the foot, no threaded hole in the machine base needed. Nut on top of the shaft is only there to retain the foot when lifting the mill.

    On my FP1, before I had the feet, I could rotate the mill with certain large cutters due to the vibration and uneven pressure under the machine base. Sure I could have shimmed it but I like the vibration damping of the feet and I don't have to reshim every time I move the mill.

    Teryk



    Sent from my XT1710-02 using Tapatalk

  2. #22
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    I am very leary of using the anchor bolt holes as a support point. From every manual I have read, they are only shown as anchor holes which means you are not supporting the weight of the machine from the holes, only keeping it from tilting-over.

    Maybe I will just use leveled anti-vibration pads which I already have. Now, what to level them with? Should I use plywood/wood below them or above (between pad and mill base)? Metal? Concern is with humidity changes (that I am trying to mitigate) and moisture inherent to concrete that will expand/contract wood making level a moving target (keeping moldcore's comment in mind: not so big a deal) and metal corroding. Further, with metal, the base may slide on it or it may slide on concrete.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails anchor-point-2.jpg   anchor-point.jpg  

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    "They move inside and ...." ????
    Yes, they move inside, the rubber is stertched a bit as the foot itself gets taller or shorter.
    There are many kinds of machine mounts, not all like a rubber pad under a screw.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Engmaxx View Post
    I am very leary of using the anchor bolt holes as a support point. From every manual I have read, they are only shown as anchor holes which means you are not supporting the weight of the machine from the holes, only keeping it from tilting-over.

    Maybe I will just use leveled anti-vibration pads which I already have. Now, what to level them with? Should I use plywood/wood below them or above (between pad and mill base)? Metal? Concern is with humidity changes (that I am trying to mitigate) and moisture inherent to concrete that will expand/contract wood making level a moving target (keeping moldcore's comment in mind: not so big a deal) and metal corroding. Further, with metal, the base may slide on it or it may slide on concrete.
    Last post on this thread. This really isn't rocket science. Both of the feet that Bob and I posted support the mill from underneath.... on a pad ..... Just as if it were sitting on a 2x4 or shim or leveling pad or any other object you were to put under a mill. Not sure how in the world you would support the mill by a hole anyway.

    The foot has multiple sections and a rubber pad. As written above, turning the shaft lengthens the foot by separating the two sections. The mill is still sitting on the foot as before, only the foot is taller.

    Teryk

    Sent from my XT1710-02 using Tapatalk

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by mTeryk View Post
    Last post on this thread. This really isn't rocket science. Both of the feet that Bob and I posted support the mill from underneath.... on a pad ..... Just as if it were sitting on a 2x4 or shim or leveling pad or any other object you were to put under a mill. Not sure how in the world you would support the mill by a hole anyway.

    The foot has multiple sections and a rubber pad. As written above, turning the shaft lengthens the foot by separating the two sections. The mill is still sitting on the foot as before, only the foot is taller.

    Teryk

    Sent from my XT1710-02 using Tapatalk
    If I understand how they work correctly, the orange pad raises when the stud is turned. Correct?

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Engmaxx View Post
    If I understand how they work correctly, the orange pad raises when the stud is turned. Correct?
    Nice cut away picture here:
    M-Series | Sunnex Mounts

    There is another company that makes one I like a little better. They dont have the washer on top, the machine sits right on the "orange pad" (the ones I am thinking of were yellow) and the screw goes down into the base where the rubber is and stretches the rubber as the machine is raised. If I remember the company I will post it

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob F. View Post
    Nice cut away picture here:
    M-Series | Sunnex Mounts

    There is another company that makes one I like a little better. They dont have the washer on top, the machine sits right on the "orange pad" (the ones I am thinking of were yellow) and the screw goes down into the base where the rubber is and stretches the rubber as the machine is raised. If I remember the company I will post it
    Thank you Rob! I briefly looked and didn't find anything. I am attaching a pic of it below. These are nice but I would still need an out-rigger either to the front or the side OR I make a plate in each corner with this in it and try to level before dropping the base on them. I could try to line the hole in the base with the stud location below so I can use it as an access hole to fine tune the level. That said, the max adjustment is 0.5 inch which may not be enough for me. I will check as promised.

    Does anyone have pictures of what they have done with them or similar?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails level-pad.jpg   level-pad-specs.jpg  

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    This is the style I like:
    Essentra Components - 550115
    If you click on 2d line drawing you should get this:
    https://www.essentracomponents.co.za...dfs/550115.pdf

    Better description of them here:
    Essentra Components - Anti-Vibration Machine Mounts

    -The foot holds in place as the thread is tightened
    -The unique design enables height adjustment whilst maintaining a totally sealed vibration absorbing base
    -Single part base, cast iron bearing plate with a nitrile rubber surround
    -Shore rubber hardness 80
    -All bolts are fine pitch

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Engmaxx View Post
    If I understand how they work correctly, the orange pad raises when the stud is turned. Correct?
    Thank you for making that clear.

    So a inverted saucer rises up to base by turning the bolt. I see a problem with BP base holes and how close they are to the vertical sides of the base. That would restrict the diameter of the saucer.
    Last edited by rons; 08-28-2019 at 09:21 PM.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    Thank you for making that clear.
    Looks to me like the orange pad does not move. The smaller pad above is what moves when the screw is turned.

  12. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mach2 View Post
    Looks to me like the orange pad does not move. The smaller pad above is what moves when the screw is turned.
    It is obvious that the orange saucer in reply #27 stays in position and the metal bushing moves up and down.

    I am looking at the link from Amazon in reply #12. So the entire yellow saucer move up and down as the bolt is turned?
    Last edited by rons; 08-28-2019 at 09:31 PM.

  13. #32
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    It is easier to quickly level a 4 foot machine by shifting the weight to 3 feet.
    So, move the table all the way to one side, that will take the weight off of the opposite front foot. Shim the two rear, and the front weighted one, then shim, or adjust the unweighted front one.

    Basically from the Hardinge manual.

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  15. #33
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    I'd pour a level plinth. If you want to know how to get your machine onto a plinth from below without lifting from above I can't tell you how.

    Regards Tyrone.


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