Bridgeport power feed repair help - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Attachment 218543Attachment 218544
    2 more images.

    You can see also from the image that the fuse for the light is removed awaiting replacement. I fused this when trying to get the mill up and running from a static converter that only managed to fuse the building.

  2. #22
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    Your links don't work
    JR

  3. #23
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    Default Mill images re-loaded

    20180122_183927.jpg
    20180122_183910.jpg
    20180122_183744.jpg
    20180122_183726.jpg
    20180122_183718.jpg

  4. #24
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    20180122_183700.jpg

    I hope these come through now? They display on my computer?

  5. #25
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    Abmeboy

    You have a UK, Adcock-Shiply built, machine with Erskine power feed controller driving both X and Y axes. The board in your third picture selects which axis is to be driven via the relays. Looks as if you have dual Imperial-Metric dials too which is, I think rare.

    Best place to start is to sign up to the Bridgeport-Mill Yahoo group where you will find full circuit diagrams of a typical Erskine controller and a typical drive selection board. As far as I'm aware most of the variations between different versions and PCB numbers are component level, different type numbers for active devices and minor changes in passive ones. The basic circuit seems to be common. The set-up and considerable functional check information is also in the group files. About the only thing missing is specifics on the pulse transformer. Which, unfortunately, appears to be one of the more common failure points. So if anyone out there has the data for that ...

    Should be enough there to get started if you or a mate knows about electronics.

    If you are inside the drive box its best to replace the control potentiometer and microswitches with good quality new ones. Also change the spring on the the selector arm. They do get tired. £40 - £50 on spec is worth it just to know you'll not get trouble there again in this decade. Connections can get iffy too over the years.

    Generally the Erskine is a very durable unit but age eventually gets to them. Fortunately they are old school discrete components so repair is practical. Probably around £150 - £200 from folk who specialise in such work.

    Clive

  6. Likes JRIowa liked this post
  7. #26
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    Thankyou for this very useful feedback.

  8. #27
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    Default Burnt capacitor.

    Quote Originally Posted by Clive603 View Post
    Abmeboy

    You have a UK, Adcock-Shiply built, machine with Erskine power feed controller driving both X and Y axes. The board in your third picture selects which axis is to be driven via the relays. Looks as if you have dual Imperial-Metric dials too which is, I think rare.

    Best place to start is to sign up to the Bridgeport-Mill Yahoo group where you will find full circuit diagrams of a typical Erskine controller and a typical drive selection board. As far as I'm aware most of the variations between different versions and PCB numbers are component level, different type numbers for active devices and minor changes in passive ones. The basic circuit seems to be common. The set-up and considerable functional check information is also in the group files. About the only thing missing is specifics on the pulse transformer. Which, unfortunately, appears to be one of the more common failure points. So if anyone out there has the data for that ...

    Should be enough there to get started if you or a mate knows about electronics.

    If you are inside the drive box its best to replace the control potentiometer and microswitches with good quality new ones. Also change the spring on the the selector arm. They do get tired. £40 - £50 on spec is worth it just to know you'll not get trouble there again in this decade. Connections can get iffy too over the years.

    Generally the Erskine is a very durable unit but age eventually gets to them. Fortunately they are old school discrete components so repair is practical. Probably around £150 - £200 from folk who specialise in such work.

    Clive
    It looks like I may have found an issue with the board when I examined closer with a magnifying glass. A burnt capacitor? Could this be the issue with the X and Y feeds?
    What do you think?20180124_165724.jpg20180124_165659.jpg20180124_165737.jpg

  9. #28
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    Doesn't look very healthy. Not quite sure what else links in up there but I'd certainly check that the diodes next to it are all OK. As I recall things thats a decent breed of capacitor and you have to be pretty unkind to make them fail prematurely.

    Now you are signed up to the Yahoo group grab the circuit diagram and have a look for other active devices in the same area that may have died taking the capacitor down too.

    Hafta say that if you are not an electronics guru yourself and don't have a mate who is its probably better to bite the bullet and get a pro to fix it rather than dive in yourself. Back in the days when I was, in a fairly minor way, an electronics guy I used to hate it when folk bought me something they had fiddled with as it so often obscured the real cause. (The one I keep as a spare was dead on arrival, £10 punt off E-Bay, and I sent that out although I "ought" to have been able to fix it myself. Sometimes life is too short. That wasn't an Erskine, later one made by a different company who I tracked down for the repair. £100 well spent.)

    Clive

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by HWElecRepair View Post
    I am a little confused on the Brown to yellow 1 and brown to yellow 2... If you looked at the wiring in the casting, can you relate those colors to the colors of the wires they go to? They should go to a white, green, red, and black...

    Personally (and when I say personally, I do believe its an opinion... like 1911 vs glock. One is for men, and the other is a glock :P ), I dont like those brushes or those little seals. I dump the seals whenever I take them out. Those springs on the brushes are much shorter and can cause issues when the carbon gets shorter. Here is a link showing the ones we put in...

    38-281 - Motor Brush

    Again, that is just a personal opinion.

    @Clive I can definitely agree with the switches. With how much oil always gets in the casting, it is a nice easy way to get rid of that possible issue.

    Another possible part to check out/change is the seal in the main gear housing. If it hasnt been changed, the seal is probably about 1/2 inch tall and seals about as well as a .22LR can punch through SAPI plates. If you look at the link below, this is the new seal and fully covers the brass bushing and seals nice and tight against the cam shaft.

    38-161 - Shaft Seal

    Jon
    H&W Machine Repair

    Jon,
    I'm finally getting back to this one, sorry for the long delay.
    I' not sure what was measured internal to the motor before, but I found the black, red, green, and white (ish) wires where the motor wiring enters the control board housing.

    White to green is 588 Ω
    Black to red is 1.5 Ω

    All other combinations (W>B, W>R, G>R, G>B) are open.

    We did find a loose solder joint on the board for one of the capacitors, but fixing that did nothing. No other obvious visual issues on the board. Any suggestions, or is the next step to replace the board?

  11. #30
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    Hi Abmeboy, yesterday i bought a bridgeport milling machine J-Head and it has the same control panel as yours does. So far I have searched through the internet and was unable to find any information regarding the auto-feed. I still need to wire it to the mains and haven't tried it yet. Even the feed motors are not visible anywhere. If you have some info I would be more then happy to learn.. will attach her photo for ref. Thanks in advance.72273529_508413396663460_7157891349033779200_n.jpg

  12. #31
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    Bazukka

    That is a standard manual Bridgeport. No power feeds to the table, you have to turn the handles.

    Clicvw


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