Bridgeport Step Pulley Restoration
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  1. #1
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    Default Bridgeport Step Pulley Restoration

    Hey everyone. I'm one of your "next door neighbors" from the South Bend forum. I've been rediscovering my love of machining and been adding some machines to my existing (wood working) shop. So over the last 15 months, I've restored 2 South Bend lathes and a South Bend drill press. Now it's time to embark on the mother-of-all-restorations... I just picked up a 1974 Step Pulley. I've done the research on what's involved in getting one home - and into the basement.

    I began to shop around and fortunately, I found one (locally) for $1,500. It DOES have a minor issue with the quill power-feed. I can't remember which direction, but it makes a "click click click" sound and doesn't want to engage. With parts being readily available, I think this should be an easy fix. Plus, it will familiarize myself with the internal workings. I'm certainly look forward to diving in and fixing it.

    Purchased Shop/Engine Crane
    I first bought a coupon on eBay for $10 that allows me to purchase the crane from Harbor Freight for $99. Got the coupon and bought my crane.

    Step 2: Trailer Hitch For Truck
    Purchased a hitch online with wiring harness. Installed it and I was read to go.

    Step 3: Schedule Pickup Date
    I made an online reservation with U-Haul for a double-axl utility trailer and coordinated with the seller.

    Step 4: Pickup
    I had the seller remove the head, then the ram. We then loaded them into the bed of the pickup. We placed them on moving blankets secured them with ratchet-straps. Next, the column/knee/bed/saddle went on and was secured with 4 (large) ratchet straps. Gingerly, I made the 1.5 hour trip on 611 along the Deleware river back home.

    When I got home, I had only 2 hours before I had to pick up the kids from school, so I printed out my "directions" on how to disassemble the mill and got to work. I'll spare the upfront details on how it all happened until after I finish the restoration. At that time, I plan on making a "how-to-move-and-unload-a-Bridgeport-into-the-basment" tutorial.

    Here's the pictures:








































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    Some more pictures of the move/unload...

    My friend generously came over to lend a hand. Turns out, I could have done this entirely myself (if I really had to) but an extra set of hands is priceless.










    Now onto the (real) disassembly, de-greasing, etc...

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    I've begun the degreasing phase of the restoration now. All nuts, bolts and anything else that's greasy, gets a nice bath in Purple-Power.

    The one thing that I know I'll be doing, is installing a Bijur one-shot lube system. This grease is a magnet for chips. I was truly amazed at all the chips that found its way into the knee. Even more puzzling was how there was a 2" thick bed of chips in the column? I'm guessing compressed air is the culprit. Here's some progress pictures.

    By the way - anyone know how to get the knee-locking binder apart?





    First batch of Purple-Power cleaned parts


    Ram & Head bolts


    I'm used to small brass way-wipers. These are just mammoth!


    This was filthy. Soaked in Purple-Power then I "screwed" a brush in and out to clean the threads.






    Knee Shaft - anyone know how this collar is removed?


    Ready for soaking


    American-Made "Enco" power-feed. In need of a good cleaning


    Parts cooking in Purple Power


    Spider & Pedestal.




    Chips all cleaned out with my Shop-Vac




    Ready for degreasing. I need to find a 4' long bin - for it's bath.


    And finally some bearings ready to be cleaned



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    Default My kids are the same way

    Give them the handle to the shop crane and keeps them busy for hours. Same thing with a floor jack.
    Nice machine, Ed

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    Default

    How in the world did you get that many pictures posted? Also, looks like you need ti do some work on the saddle with a scrapper.

    Tom

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    Cool

    Nice work there Brad...Bob

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    Brad,
    I am going to follow this thread for a couple reasons. First because you are ahead of me in doing a mill. I thought I would be restoring one noe mydelf but the deal fell through. So, I'll continue searching, but for a smaller one. Next, I know your work from the South Bend Forum and will be excited to see your finished project. Last but not least I'll be reading other members here that don't know your work and speed to see how amazed they will be.
    Good luck,
    and take a break once in a while so we can breath!
    danny

  8. Likes Jaddamasa liked this post
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    Well impressed with your progress,going to follow you with interest,just a quick couple of questions im in the uk,what is purple power and how bad were those control levers before the soak,they look real good.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TDegenhart View Post
    How in the world did you get that many pictures posted? Also, looks like you need ti do some work on the saddle with a scrapper.

    Tom
    Tom - you're allowed 20 photo-links. I have the pictures hosted in my (free) Photobucket account. Free... about to go "pro" since they only allow 10GB of traffic per month



    Quote Originally Posted by aametalmaster View Post
    Nice work there Brad...Bob
    Why thank you, Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by intrepid View Post
    Brad,
    I am going to follow this thread for a couple reasons. First because you are ahead of me in doing a mill. I thought I would be restoring one noe mydelf but the deal fell through. So, I'll continue searching, but for a smaller one. Next, I know your work from the South Bend Forum and will be excited to see your finished project. Last but not least I'll be reading other members here that don't know your work and speed to see how amazed they will be.
    Good luck,
    and take a break once in a while so we can breath!
    danny
    You are TOO kind, thanks man

    Quote Originally Posted by bikenut View Post
    Well impressed with your progress,going to follow you with interest,just a quick couple of questions im in the uk,what is purple power and how bad were those control levers before the soak,they look real good.
    Purple Power is just a de-greaser that I found to work like a charm. Un-diluted, this stuff (pretty much) melts away grease and oil. Even on bearings that are packed with grease. Plus, its very inexpensive. $13 for a 2.5 gallon jug

    The ball cranks were nearly as clean as you see them. They only had some slight dust-oil mixture on them in the places where your hand can't reach. I was really trying to just clean out the internal, female threads.

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    Default removing knee lock

    to remove knee lock---look at knee as it is normally placed in machine--go to ''left'' side and follow knee locking shaft towards the vertical dovetail ways---at the very end of the shaft on the side of the knee you will notice what appears to be an electrical snap -in cap. adjacent and parallel you will notice a set screw---this is what holds the shaft in place. THIS IS ACTUALLY TWO SET SCREWS --one very small locking set screw is installed on top of the first set screw . this mechanism is used many many times by bridgeport mill . especially in powerhead. if you are not aware of ''double locking'' set screws and try to dissassem. bp --much damage will occur. now remove both set screws then turn shaft to the''unlocked ''position. now the fun part ---work the shaft in a shallow arc and pull it outward away from the knee--there is a lot of crud around this shaft as seen from ur pic's. this will take some effort. once this is done remove the '''elec cap'' and behind it you will find the ''locking plunger''--it has a threaded 1/4 inch bolt thread in the end of the cap-----screw in bolt or all-thread and remove this plunger--''now you be done. there is a manual for sale printed in 2010--i cannot stress how very very much help this manual will help--it's a gotta have. ''a guide to renovating the bridgeport mill'' there are two versions depending on the model you own--it's printed by the ''ilion industrial sevices, llc in 2010. h/w machine repair has them for sale. hope i was able to help. re steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by smallfly View Post
    to remove knee lock---look at knee as it is normally placed in machine--go to ''left'' side and follow knee locking shaft towards the vertical dovetail ways---at the very end of the shaft on the side of the knee you will notice what appears to be an electrical snap -in cap. adjacent and parallel you will notice a set screw---this is what holds the shaft in place. THIS IS ACTUALLY TWO SET SCREWS --one very small locking set screw is installed on top of the first set screw . this mechanism is used many many times by bridgeport mill . especially in powerhead. if you are not aware of ''double locking'' set screws and try to dissassem. bp --much damage will occur. now remove both set screws then turn shaft to the''unlocked ''position. now the fun part ---work the shaft in a shallow arc and pull it outward away from the knee--there is a lot of crud around this shaft as seen from ur pic's. this will take some effort. once this is done remove the '''elec cap'' and behind it you will find the ''locking plunger''--it has a threaded 1/4 inch bolt thread in the end of the cap-----screw in bolt or all-thread and remove this plunger--''now you be done. there is a manual for sale printed in 2010--i cannot stress how very very much help this manual will help--it's a gotta have. ''a guide to renovating the bridgeport mill'' there are two versions depending on the model you own--it's printed by the ''ilion industrial sevices, llc in 2010. h/w machine repair has them for sale. hope i was able to help. re steve
    Fantastic help! Thanks Steve

    One other question, how do I remove the "elec cap"? That's the confusing part for me?

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    Default painting...

    I know you move quick but... I think you're going to need a bigger paint brush for this project

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    Quote Originally Posted by lepton View Post
    I know you move quick but... I think you're going to need a bigger paint brush for this project
    HAHAHA!!!

    You got that right

    I (might) step up to a 3/4"...

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    the ''elec. type cap'' should be rite next to the set screws i spoke of. it is bout 3/4 inch. dia.--just slide something thin like putty knife under outer edge and just pop it out of the hole---it just ''snaps''in ---thats what how i got mine out---just like pic in instruction book--i sure would advise you to buy. allllll you will ever need to know is in that book. everyting is numbered in steps --then done also in reverse to reassem mill---i just went step#1 step #2 yada yada ----. hope this helps re steve

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    Quote Originally Posted by smallfly View Post
    the ''elec. type cap'' should be rite next to the set screws i spoke of. it is bout 3/4 inch. dia.--just slide something thin like putty knife under outer edge and just pop it out of the hole---it just ''snaps''in ---thats what how i got mine out---just like pic in instruction book--i sure would advise you to buy. allllll you will ever need to know is in that book. everyting is numbered in steps --then done also in reverse to reassem mill---i just went step#1 step #2 yada yada ----. hope this helps re steve
    Just got the book. I like Steve's stuff and I know I'll take away a lot of knowledge.

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    I am just completing the renovation of my 1958 Bridgeport and I think the best tool in my tool box was a copy of "A Guide to Renovating the Bridgeport Series 1 "J" Head Milling Machine", published by ILION Industrial Services. It is the best $29 you can spend on a project like this.

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    Brad,

    Nice thread, and good progress so far. I bought Steve Brooks book, and its a nice piece of work. I'm glad to hear you're planning on a "How to Move a Bridgeport" aid. After looking at your YouTube vids, and the thread on your 9" resto, I'd say you have a talent for it.
    I moved my BP with the same trailer, the only difference was that I used an Eye bolt to lift it in one piece, with the same HF cherry picker.
    I'm sure you're having fun scraping all that grease out of the ways, but those Zerk fittings are for OIL ONLY. The previous owner didn't realize that there is a special oil gun for charging the lube channels. I'm pretty sure Steve covers that in the book.
    Good luck with the rebuild, I'll be watching the bit on the powerfeed; Mine just took a dump, and I haven't had a chance to look at it yet.

    Mick Finch
    bluechipmachineshop.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by mickfinch View Post
    The previous owner didn't realize that there is a special oil gun for charging the lube channels.
    Mick - really? That's good news then, because I was going to piece together all the components for the Bijur-one-shot lube system. But, I'd have no issues with oiling the machine when I'm going to use it. I do it for my lathe, right? Plus, this mill won't see everyday, production type work.

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    Regarding the oil gun, see my comments below.

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...-bijur-242293/

    Tom


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