Cleaning up bridgeport mill - Page 6
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  1. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by JRIowa View Post
    I'm all for keeping the thread open. Just remember, this isn't the "spooge tank forum" or the "soda blaster forum". If it stays on BP stuff, it won't get locked. If it wanders all over the place.....
    JR
    Don't worry about it. It's going to be a blow by blow novel on rust removal.

  2. #102
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    Finally got the gib loose and removed. All my photos I take from my phone will be going to the Google photos link I posted if you want to see a closer view of the gib or any other part so far. I have no idea what I'm looking at yet as far as inspection of the parts, but I will search some other posts to get a better idea.

    Bridgeport Mill - Google Photos

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  3. #103
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    Scotch Brite and wd40 and call it a day.

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    Finally got the table off, but did find the feed nut bracket was broke. It is on the power feed side. Does it have to be replaced or can I use it after I get everything cleaned up to see where the machine is at?

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  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by adambomb777 View Post
    Finally got the table off, but did find the feed nut bracket was broke. It is on the power feed side. Does it have to be replaced or can I use it after I get everything cleaned up to see where the machine is at?

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    See if you have a SEAL, Delta Force, USMC, Army Combat Engineer or NG Engineer outfit as needs training in disabling enemy rolling stock, aircraft, watercraft, generator sets, or artillery with Thermate charges, make a donation...

    .. and call it a MONTH!


  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by adambomb777 View Post
    Finally got the table off, but did find the feed nut bracket was broke. It is on the power feed side. Does it have to be replaced or can I use it after I get everything cleaned up to see where the machine is at?

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
    Pulling it and cleaning it will be the only way to know for sure, but the first pic is not looking too promising. Didn't someone else send you price list? What is new cost? Get a stiff bristled wood handled brush, like they selling for cleaning BBQ grills, and some solvent and scrub that lead screw well before removing.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Pulling it and cleaning it will be the only way to know for sure, but the first pic is not looking too promising. Didn't someone else send you price list? What is new cost? Get a stiff bristled wood handled brush, like they selling for cleaning BBQ grills, and some solvent and scrub that lead screw well before removing.
    $210. I will clean the lead screw really good. I've only seen one broke in the same spot. Most of the others were broke where you tighten the backlash, which obviously had to be replaced. I was just hoping to test the machine as is when it was all cleaned up, then decide what needed to be fixed.

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  8. #108
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    Well, I'll be the contrary one - all I am seeing is a semi-circular chunk broken out at one end. Unless I'm missing something else in the pictures, I am going to predict that that break is not going to cause any functional problems. Given the overall condition of this machine, I'd personally hate to put $210 into a new nut.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awake View Post
    Well, I'll be the contrary one - all I am seeing is a semi-circular chunk broken out at one end. Unless I'm missing something else in the pictures, I am going to predict that that break is not going to cause any functional problems. Given the overall condition of this machine, I'd personally hate to put $210 into a new nut.
    I almost have one side of the lead screw shined up and then I'll get a better picture. I thought it would still be ok, but we will see. I agree on not putting much money into it until I have it disassembled.

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  10. #110
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    Barry said he believes it is a defect in the casting and has seen this happen before. As long as there is no visible crack coming from that area, it is something that can be re-used.

    Jon
    H&W Machine Repair

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    Quote Originally Posted by HWElecRepair View Post
    Barry said he believes it is a defect in the casting and has seen this happen before. As long as there is no visible crack coming from that area, it is something that can be re-used.

    Jon
    H&W Machine Repair
    Thank you for the information. I didn't see a crack, but once I have the screw out I should be able to see it a little better.

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    As for cleaning just about everything I've ever came across. Plain old white vinegar. Cost about 2 bucks a gallon and it'll go a long way. Rusted parts soak for a hour scrub with wire brush to break up material and resoak if necessary. After done you will have the finish of what the metal was when machined minus any pitting from major rust issues. Doesn't effect paints.
    After cleaning I rinse in hot water,dry,and coat with a light oil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cadillac View Post
    As for cleaning just about everything I've ever came across. Plain old white vinegar. Cost about 2 bucks a gallon and it'll go a long way. Rusted parts soak for a hour scrub with wire brush to break up material and resoak if necessary. After done you will have the finish of what the metal was when machined minus any pitting from major rust issues. Doesn't effect paints.
    After cleaning I rinse in hot water,dry,and coat with a light oil.
    I did recently see a restore of a bridgeport mill on youtube that used vinegar and it turned out nice. I bought 5 gallons of evaporust early on before everyone mentioned the citric acid. I think it has worked well, even though it is more expensive($75).

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  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by adambomb777 View Post
    I almost have one side of the lead screw shined up and then I'll get a better picture. I thought it would still be ok, but we will see. I agree on not putting much money into it until I have it disassembled.

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    I know you probably know this, but the $210 part in the picture is not the nut, its the nut retainer for both axes. It holds the brass nut elements, which are keyed to this part. The stress on this part shouldn't be too high in normal use, so a crack or chip shouldn't affect it too much. But there's no way to judge its condition or functionality with all that crap on it. Once you get it cleaned up, post another picture. Like others here, I will probably tell you to blend out the chip if that's all it is and carry on.

    NOTE: The square keys are staked into the cast nut retainer. I didn't realize that and ended up breaking those tiny pins off. Didn't really matter. But splitting the nuts and loose installing everything was a bit fiddly. I threaded the nuts onto the screws then attempted to put the nuts into the retainer with the keys loose-ish. Anyway- some tricks there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    I know you probably know this, but the $210 part in the picture is not the nut, its the nut retainer for both axes. It holds the brass nut elements, which are keyed to this part. The stress on this part shouldn't be too high in normal use, so a crack or chip shouldn't affect it too much. But there's no way to judge its condition or functionality with all that crap on it. Once you get it cleaned up, post another picture. Like others here, I will probably tell you to blend out the chip if that's all it is and carry on.

    NOTE: The square keys are staked into the cast nut retainer. I didn't realize that and ended up breaking those tiny pins off. Didn't really matter. But splitting the nuts and loose installing everything was a bit fiddly. I threaded the nuts onto the screws then attempted to put the nuts into the retainer with the keys loose-ish. Anyway- some tricks there.
    The casting is good to go. I thought the top lock screw was just missing and had grease in it, but it is actually broke. I bought some left handed drill bits to get it out. I would have never guessed the square keys were staked, I thought about taking them out, but decided to just clean it up real good. I am trying to find some information on how to inspect the brass nuts, I will probably still use them for now. But it would be nice to know.

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    I am new. Have had a Bridgeport for 2years. What do I use to lubricant the oil zerts? Where do I get the oil and oil gun? Please email the info to
    [email protected]
    Thank you
    Last edited by Andy5; 02-23-2018 at 06:10 PM. Reason: Added to

  17. #117
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    I don’t know of any easy way to inspect the threads. My advice is to go ahead and saw them in half. After you reassemble everything, you can run the screws end to end. If they bind at the ends, then you know you have a worn screw. Just keep the gibs loose so you can isolate their tightness.

    I think if I replaced the screw, I’d replace the nuts as well.

    Sorry- you can check end play with the nuts on the screws before you split them. That should be the same as lash at the dials.

  18. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by AdamC View Post
    I don’t know of any easy way to inspect the threads. My advice is to go ahead and saw them in half. After you reassemble everything, you can run the screws end to end. If they bind at the ends, then you know you have a worn screw. Just keep the gibs loose so you can isolate their tightness.

    I think if I replaced the screw, I’d replace the nuts as well.

    Sorry- you can check end play with the nuts on the screws before you split them. That should be the same as lash at the dials.
    The top is already in two pieces. The bottom nut looks pretty good, but is one piece. So I just put it on the screw and see how much I turn the nut before it moves?

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  19. #119
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    Best way to check the screw/nut is to assemble the table, put the table in the center of travel, and indicate the end of the table. Then push and pull the table to see how much play you have. This play is going to be the screw and the nut combined.

    Then move the table to the end of the travel and do the same test. The play that you have at the end of the table is the wear in the nut, since most people dont run that much at the far end of the table.

    Jon
    H&W Machine Repair

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    Quote Originally Posted by HWElecRepair View Post
    Best way to check the screw/nut is to assemble the table, put the table in the center of travel, and indicate the end of the table. Then push and pull the table to see how much play you have. This play is going to be the screw and the nut combined.

    Then move the table to the end of the travel and do the same test. The play that you have at the end of the table is the wear in the nut, since most people dont run that much at the far end of the table.

    Jon
    H&W Machine Repair
    Ok thank you.

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