Cleaning up bridgeport mill - Page 8
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  1. #141
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    The dog teeth definitely broke off that hub. . The bull gear normally comes out as an assembly. The assembly comes out by first removing the Hi/Lo shifter pinion (that whole pinion pulls out with the knob attached. The pinion is what holds the bull gear assembly in there.

    Of course the bull gear assembly may be rusted in there, but make sure you have the Hi/Lo shifter out first.

    Perhaps the dog teeth broke off by beating out the drawbar? If you had to really wack the drawbar out from the spindle end, I could see that possibly breaking the dog teeth off, if that's where the drawbar was seized.

    That's a really great offer from Barry at H&W. I'd take him up on it. He could probably explain things really well, and could disassemble these machines in his sleep.

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  3. #142
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    I will definitely take Barry up on his offer. I will try and call on monday(next off day). I followed his video step by step. The hi-low came out super easy and has been out from the beginning. I am definitely a perfectionist. I have lubed everything for weeks at a time to avoid breaking anything. This was the first part I broke besides a taper pin on the powerfeed, which I had to drill out. Since then the lip to the bearing sleeve has come off in places. This area has been soaking with either transmission fluid, pb blaster, evaporust, and a krud kutter rust product for over a week. The splined gear hub and the spindle are stuck together. They move up and down with eachother. Thanks for the help.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  4. #143
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    Not sure if Monday the 18th is a Holiday for H & W or not. Looks like you are moving right along with this project, and doing it correctly.

    Dan

  5. #144
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    We dont celebrate many holidays, and Barry is always available for tech support. We will be at the shop on Monday.

    Jon

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    Quote Originally Posted by HWElecRepair View Post
    We dont celebrate many holidays, and Barry is always available for tech support. We will be at the shop on Monday.

    Jon
    I forgot all about the holiday. Good to know you will be there. I plan on sending Barry a video before I call, so he can see where I'm at. Hopefully it will make it easier to understand when I call.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  7. #146
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanLinsch View Post
    Looks like you are moving right along with this project, and doing it correctly.Dan
    I'm trying, this part of the mill has been the toughest part yet. I had to work away from home most of last year, so I figured I better get with it while I'm still able to be home.

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  8. #147
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    @Adam Barry has seen the videos and is pretty sure he knows whats going on with it. He explained it to me, but I understood it about as well as when I explain electronics stuff to him lol

    Jon

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  10. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by HWElecRepair View Post
    @Adam Barry has seen the videos and is pretty sure he knows whats going on with it. He explained it to me, but I understood it about as well as when I explain electronics stuff to him lol

    Jon
    I talked to Barry this morning. Thank you for your help.

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  12. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by adambomb777 View Post
    I just got a bridgeport mill yesterday and am starting to take it apart. I have only lubed up everything with pb blaster and tested a rust remover with 0000 steel wool. I have found some pretty good info on removing the table, so I think I can figure it out. I was wondering what the best way is to get lube under the table before I try to slide it off? Also what process would you guys use to de-rust this table? I was thinking electrolysis for the rust inside the t slot areas, but don't want to ruin anything. Any recommendations are appreciated. Let me know if the link to the pictures doesn't work.
    Your best bet is to completely disassemble the machine and thoroughly Scotch-Brite all of the working surfaces. Cast iron is a porous material so the rust goes down into the iron. Therefore trying to shine the machine would be a waste of time. Rust is in itself abrasive so failure to clean the surface of the working parts would be tantamount to lubing with lapping compound. If you have a live spindle and three operable axis then you can machine parts but I would bid any aircraft parts.

    I built a complete clutch conversion for a GM Turbo-Hydramatic 400 transmission on an old Bridgeport mill with a round overarm and with either a Morse or Brown & Sharp taper. I think the mill might have been used to build the Monarch line shaft lathe that I used to rough turn the shafts for heat treat and grinding. It was the transmission for the dragster in the picture below. Now I have nice CNC machinery and there's no way in hell that I could pull that off today because that guy skipped out and left me holding this old bag of bones that no longer fit together.

    Good Luck,
    Ron

    1st-burnout_zpsm43v84fb.jpg

  13. #150
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    Because the flange broke off of the bearing sleeve, I was able to take housing off. I've come to the conclusion the spindle is not going to slide through the splined gear hub. I've only come up with two options. Take everything out with the quill and soak it in evaporust. It appears the bearing sleeve is smaller than the quill, so should slide out. Then use the hydraulic press to try and separate them. Option 2 would be to carefully cut from the bearing sleeve to the splined gear hub to remove it from the shaft. I would assume the bearing sleeve needs to be replaced without the flange? I'm not sure. The only other item not disassembled on the head is the fine feed hand wheel area, the Philips screw is not coming off yet. Any suggestions are appreciated.

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    I think cutting it off is less likely to damage the spindle splines, but it's probably not going to be easy to cut through.

    There is no phillips screw in your pics. Did you mean allen screw?

    You've probably already discovered this, but Bridgeport liked to use double allen screws a lot. One for the set, and another "thru" allen screw for the lock.

    Sometimes the allen screws can perfectly line up so that it's easy to be on both screws at once with your allen wrench. Then they won't turn (especially if they are rusty). I don't know if the locations you show have double allen screws or not, but I wouldn't be surprised if they did. If so, make sure you are taking only the "thru" allen screw out first, not trying to take them both out at the same time. The "thru" allen screws are very short (about an 1/8" long).

    If they are not a double allen screw, have you tried tapping on the allen wrench with a hammer, while applying torque to get them to spin?

    I know you are only disassembling this machine for practice, but I just want to mention again, that unless the ways are smokin good after the rust is cleaned up, the machine is not worth restoring. I mention this, even though it's been mentioned before because it looks like you would have to spend some significant money to bring this machine back, and then you'll still only have a sub par machine after spending all the money. Sometimes it's easy to just start buying replacement parts, once you are this far into it. I know because I've done that before.

    If you can cannibalize parts off another machine, that might make your project economically worth the cost. Or if the ways are really good, that might make it worth spending the money on the replacement parts. Just make sure you are really honest with yourself in evaluating the ways.

  15. #152
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    Sorry, I meant to say flathead screw on the collar where the fine feed is. I finally got the screw out last night. The quill, spindle, and bearing sleeve are soaking in evaporust. I am going to try and free it up and give the hydraulic press a try. I will definitely keep your advice in mind after I get everything cleaned up and see what needs to be replaced.

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  16. #153
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    Wow - certainly a far gone machine.


    Any updates?

  17. #154
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    Quote Originally Posted by acrosteve View Post
    Wow - certainly a far gone machine.


    Any updates?
    One more stubborn bolt on the pedestal and this machine is completely disassembled. The ways actually turned out much better than I was thinking they would. So I will be spending the money to get it back in working order. Paint is on the way, I still need to remove the old paint on everything.

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    scrap it, waste of time. probably too late, but they made thousands and thousands of them,(still making them) and they arnt making any more time for you (or me), our clocks are ticking, the iron is out there, pick your battles.

  19. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    scrap it, waste of time. probably too late, but they made thousands and thousands of them,(still making them) and they arnt making any more time for you (or me), our clocks are ticking, the iron is out there, pick your battles.
    I was just curious why you think it is a bad idea if the ways are in decent shape?

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  20. #157
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    well, if it looks like its been submerged in salt water for a year, who cares if the ways are somehow ok?

  21. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyanidekid View Post
    well, if it looks like its been submerged in salt water for a year, who cares if the ways are somehow ok?
    Fair enough, it definitely did look bad. I think it will be a good machine when I'm done and I know what I have when its completed. Most of the mills on eBay/craigslist the ways look pretty bad or they don't show them at all. So I just thought decent ways would be a good start for a machine.

  22. #159
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    a start of a good machine is something not totally f****d, look, I've been there, done that, believe me. just sayin, really, value your time a little higher. if you already own it, which it looks like you do, just consider it a learning experience and rip it down to see whats there, but sober up and don't try to make that pile of crap be what it aint.

    pull it apart to learn, then go buy something not so completely f****ed. trust me on that. there is just so much better to spend your time on.

  23. #160
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    I utterly disagree with cyanidekid. I am currently in the scraping part of my 1913ish WB Knight #2. There is tons of iron out there, tons of brands, thousands of other machines that I could have that wouldnt have taken a year to get apart, cleaned, painted, and starting way work.

    He has taken all this time to get it apart to just stop and not see it through? All of the hard work is done. Well, for me the head rebuilding would kick my ass. But I got family who can help with that. :P

    Just my 2 cents.

    Jon


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