Hardinge HC Refurb Project, Turret Doesn't Index, Varispeed doesn't adjust - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Ran these for a living. Never used the Hardinge setting tool for anything other than the round end for drill holders. Surprised they are hard to find, we had a bunch of them, they were all over the place. Square tools are easy to set, if they're 3/8" square just a straight edge on the top of the tool to see if your cutting edge is low. Or use a piece of 3/8" tool steel on the top of the turret. Hardinge used to sell little boxes of mixed plastic shims, color indicated thickness. Used hacksaw blades also got turned into shims, grind the teeth off so they're flat. If you couldn't stone your tools in place you weren't going to run one of these for long. Everyone had a flat and a round diamond lap in their apron pocket. These were production machine you had to make tools that would last. Probably 90%+ of the insert tooling doesn't work, not sharp enough edges.
    They were designed to run cutting oil, the spindle bearings aren't sealed. Water soluble coolant will wash the lube out of the spindle bearings. We chose to run water soluble so we could get cutting speeds and livability up and oil smoke down. Can't imagine running a chucker, on a production basis running oil. Did that, your whole life smells of oil. We called it eau de Withrow. Replaced the spindle bearings every few years, surprising how noisy they would get and still be accurate. Made an aluminum nose cone for one that was held in place by a nut on the thread nose that kept the coolant from shooting right onto the spindle, that made the bearings last a lot longer.
    Those were the days

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  3. #42
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    "Ran these for a living. Never used the Hardinge setting tool for anything other than the round end for drill holders. Surprised they are hard to find, we had a bunch of them, they were all over the place."
    So you are the one that caused the shortage! Insert smiley here.

    With well placed oil there really is not that much splatter, we have only run a couple of jobs where excessive smoke was an issue. A combination of multiple well placed streams and the use of the Hardinge splash guard will keep the oil under control. We have an old Tsugami and an AHC with Omniturns used almost daily for 20 years.

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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
    Ran these for a living. Never used the Hardinge setting tool for anything other than the round end for drill holders. Surprised they are hard to find, we had a bunch of them, they were all over the place.
    I haven’t seen any on eBay.
    I called Hardinge and they got back to me with a quote that was more than twice what I paid for the lathe... :-)
    I think they simply don’t have them any longer, so the hefty price tag was to have one made.

    I bought a new 5/8” carbide end mill blank, 6” long from a local endmill shop, with the assumption/hope that they are 0.6250” and straight and concentric.


    Quote Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
    Square tools are easy to set, if they're 3/8" square just a straight edge on the top of the tool to see if your cutting edge is low. Or use a piece of 3/8" tool steel on the top of the turret. Hardinge used to sell little boxes of mixed plastic shims, color indicated thickness. Used hacksaw blades also got turned into shims, grind the teeth off so they're flat. If you couldn't stone your tools in place you weren't going to run one of these for long. Everyone had a flat and a round diamond lap in their apron pocket. These were production machine you had to make tools that would last. Probably 90%+ of the insert tooling doesn't work, not sharp enough edges.
    They were designed to run cutting oil, the spindle bearings aren't sealed. Water soluble coolant will wash the lube out of the spindle bearings. We chose to run water soluble so we could get cutting speeds and livability up and oil smoke down. Can't imagine running a chucker, on a production basis running oil. Did that, your whole life smells of oil. We called it eau de Withrow. Replaced the spindle bearings every few years, surprising how noisy they would get and still be accurate. Made an aluminum nose cone for one that was held in place by a nut on the thread nose that kept the coolant from shooting right onto the spindle, that made the bearings last a lot longer.
    Those were the days
    I have one of those nose protectors that snaps on, but yours sounds interesting. So, it rotates with the spindle?
    Have a picture?

  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Ross "AlfaGTA" had posted a photo of some milling he was doing that showed a water-clear oil-based coolant. Asked him how he kept it so CLEAN, and he was kind enough to ID it. In my notes... somewhere.

    The amazing part is that while it was NOT the most bleeding-edge performer as a coolant/lube, it was certainly proven "good enough", ANNNND he he was getting multiple YEARS of life out of it w/o special handling, Voodoo chemistry, need of frequent disposal magic, nasty bio-degradation, any deleterious influence on parts - any common alloy - OR on his lovely machine-tools.

    Fill tank and forget, near-as-dammit.

    A pail or drum (if I must..) is still on my "to do" list.
    I’m all ears.
    Mobilmet 427 doesn’t seem to be available anymore.

  7. #45
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    Not sure where you tried but the Mobil website shows it still available.
    https://www.mobil.com/en/industrial/...met-420-series
    I get this from a industrial lubricant supplier in Gonzales Tx. You should be able to find a local supplier in your area. The Mobil website has a find a distributer function.
    When I started in this business it was Mobilmet 308, then Mobilmet Omnicron, we changed to Nu for heavier duty version of the same family. I called them when Nu was discontinued and 427 was suggested as the closest replacement. Besides the additives for metal cutting it does have anti misting qualities. Every now and then you will see a drop pull into a round shape and hold that shape all the way down a steep slope on the machine.
    I just got in a rut and always try them first, we even use their FM 32 for drip oil for the irrigation well pump with the idea that food machinery oil will be less toxic in the irrigation reservoir, in the past we have gotten our drinking water from the same well.

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  9. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by rpseguin View Post
    I’m all ears.
    I can't find any notes.

    Best I can tell from perusing old PM threads, it was Master Chemical's Trim OM-100, later OM-300.

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  11. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    Not sure where you tried but the Mobil website shows it still available.
    Metalworking Cutting Oil - Mobilmet™ 42 Series | Mobil™
    I get this from a industrial lubricant supplier in Gonzales Tx. You should be able to find a local supplier in your area. The Mobil website has a find a distributer function.
    When I started in this business it was Mobilmet 308, then Mobilmet Omnicron, we changed to Nu for heavier duty version of the same family. I called them when Nu was discontinued and 427 was suggested as the closest replacement. Besides the additives for metal cutting it does have anti misting qualities. Every now and then you will see a drop pull into a round shape and hold that shape all the way down a steep slope on the machine.
    I just got in a rut and always try them first, we even use their FM 32 for drip oil for the irrigation well pump with the idea that food machinery oil will be less toxic in the irrigation reservoir, in the past we have gotten our drinking water from the same well.

    I think I was thinking of Nu when I replied before.

    Web searches for Mobilmet 427 seem to return results for 426.

    I called the local oil/lubricant distributor and Mobilmet 427 is a special order, with a minimum size of a drum or bulk delivery to your storage tank. I told her that I had a storage tank in the size and shape of a 5 gallon pail :-)

    I'll call the local machine shop tool and supply place to see what they have.

  12. #48
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    The 426 is probably more common but lighter duty. You might find a shop in the area that buys drums and ask them to fill up a pail. Screw machine shops would be a good bet. If you were close by and gave me a call, I would sure work with you, I would guess most other shops would do the same.
    When I first started in business for myself, I sold my Harley to buy a Taiwanese turret lathe and was poorer than a church mouse. I went to the hardware store and bought pipe threading oil in gallon cans. Pretty stinky and it ate up the brass shims in the machine.

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