Hardinge HLV-H as first lathe - What to look for - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    "Hardinge has plenty of power to do what they were best at... making multiple gadzillions of small parts... fast, and at low unit-labour and machine-time cost."

    termite, I am impressed that you have the nerve to post about Hardinge after lying about running a custom 8000rpm HLVH making little screws!
    termite, from now on use one of your other fake IDs, termite the bully is finished!

  2. #22
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    I don’t think of a Hardinge as a first or only lathe. I’m sure there are folks who spend all day making small precision parts for whom a Hardinge is the cat’s ass. For those, like me, who have a wide variety of tasks a different lathe, or two lathes, is required. A Hardinge is just too limiting in capacity and grunt. Would prefer a 12-15” swing lathe with a gap and at least 40” between centers for first/only lathe. A little bigger if possible. Suggest getting and using this first. For second lathe, yes, a small instrument lathe is lovely.

    Maybe the OP only wants to do small finicky work, in which case, ignore me...

    L7

  3. #23
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    I find 9" swing over the carriage and 18" between centres covers 95% of what I want to do. It's quite happy with an 8" 4 jaw and a 10" faceplate.

    Horses for courses.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Nothing to add but one thing no one has mentioned.. so far.

    A Hardinge base "cabinet" is NOT the lightweight office-desk category animal it might at first resemble.

    The all-up mass of small lathe, big cabinet, lots of "stuff" in it, and built to stay stiff and last a long hard working life ... on proper machine-hall floors.
    Good point on the weight in getting in to a truck or trailer. Also tie it down well when moving, I have heard of several biting the dust when they tipped over in the truck or on the forklift.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    Good point on the weight in getting in to a truck or trailer. Also tie it down well when moving, I have heard of several biting the dust when they tipped over in the truck or on the forklift.
    Heavy, relatively... but NOT "top heavy".

    Actually more rare to tumble a Hardinge (or a Wade, etc.) than most larger "engine" lathes.

  6. #26
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    I would first check that everything functions, and check for missing parts:
    controls, threading, qc geabox, carriage motor and control, power feeds,
    check spindle if sounds decent
    check spindle outer taper and 5c collet taper wear
    check how much backlash is in the dials--if it's small great, if not they you can assess
    Then check wear, bed, leadscrews, cross and compound.
    check that compound will clamp securely

    Some wear is OK and to be expected, extreme wear and fixing any major things , and finding parts will be relatively difficult (Hardinge probably has few, and the prices are shocking if so, so it's an Ebay scavenger hunt).
    They are relatively heavy 1000 lb, and front/top heavy, bolted mine to 4+ foot 4x4's perpendicular to the bed, with blocking attached to those parallel, and moved with pallet jack and rollback wrecker.

    Basic tooling are 5c collets, 3 and 4 jaw chuck, faceplate, etc--all of these are relatively easy to find on ebay.

    IMO, I would not buy it sight-unseen, as you mention, a clapped out or broken machine is of no use and an exercise in frustration--even if the price is cheap, and a hardinge is expensive and difficult to find replacement parts.

  7. #27
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    Hey there, have you buy your Hardinge hlv-h?
    I have one, I may sale it

  8. #28
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    Leo Casteneda eh? Any relation to Carlos?

  9. #29
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    I have not bought one yet. I might be interested send me a message. Thanks!

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leocastaneda View Post
    Hey there, have you buy your Hardinge hlv-h?
    I have one, I may sale it
    Hi, I am not the original poster, but I would be interested in looking at your lathe and perhaps buy it. I'll try sending you a PM. Or you can send me one too.

    Jacques


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